Skip to main content

Full text of "Our College Times"

See other formats


E&ro 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/ourcollegetimes1819201921 



J t Me* 

IIP 



Our College Times 

SEPTEMBER 
NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY 




ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE 




ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA. 



0000(XX)OOOOCX>e30000CXXXXXX>OOOOCXX}OOOOOOOOOOOCXXXXXXXXXXX}0000000 



BEE 
HIVE 




HIVE 



DEPARTMENT STORE 



OUR CREED 



We believe in the goods we are selling in our ability 
to get results. We believe that honest goods can be sold 
to honest people by honest methods. We believe in work- 
ing, not wasting; in laughing; not crying; in boosting, 
not knocking; and in the pleasure of doing business, we 
believe that a man gets what he goes after; that a cus- 
tomer today is worth two customers tomorrow, and that 
no man is down and out until he has lost faith in himself. 
We believe in courtesy, in kindness, in generosity, in good 
cheer, in friendship, and in honest competition. We be- 
lieve in increasing our business, and that the way to do 
it is to reach for it. 



WE ARE REACHING FOR YOURS 

A. A. ABELE 

ELIZABETHTOWN. 



OOCXXXXX)OOOOOCXXXX>OOOOCXXX)OOOOOOOOOOCXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX)0000000 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



^00O00(XXXXXXXXXXX)00000CXXX}0O00O00O0O0O0OOOOOO0O0OO000O00000O( 

W. S. SMITH, President PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

ELIZABETHTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL $100,000.00 

SURPLUS & PROFITS 144,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited Interest Paid On Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent 

DIRECTORS: 

W. S. Smith Elmer W. Strickler Peter N. Rutt 

F. W. Groff J. S. Risser B. L. Geyer 

E. C. Ginder Amos P. Coble E. E. Coble 

^oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo^ 

ELIZABETHTOWN EXCHANGE BANK 



Now Occupies Its New Bank Building 
Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 

Pays Interest on Time Deposits 

OFFICERS 

A. G. HEISEY, President ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier 
I. H. STAUFFER, Asst. Cashier C. A. COBLE, Teller 

DIRECTORS 

A. G. Heisey Henry E Landis B. H. Greider 

Allen A. Coble „ ~ ~ M. K. Forney 

H. J. Gish Ge °' D - BoggS W. A. Withers 

Jos. G. Heisey E - E « Hernle y A. C. Fridy 

iooooooooooex)oocxxxxxxxxxxxx>ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo< 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



a ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ a ■ ■ a ■ ■ ■ ■ h ■ ■ ■ e ■ e c b b a a ■ ■ 



Plain 
Clothing 



WATT & SHAND 



Centre Square LANCASTER, PA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



FARMERS' NATIONAL BANK 

LITITZ, PENM. 



KEYSTONE NATIONAL BANK 

MANHEIM, PENNSYLVANIA 

CAPITAL $ 125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS 165,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 1,500,000 

FOUR PER CENT. INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS 
ACCOUNTS LARGE OR SMALL SOLICITED 

OFFICERS 
John B. Shenk, President 
H. M. Beamesderfer, Vice-President H. A. Merkey, Teller 

J. G. Graybill, Cashier Norman Weaver, Clerk 

Clair H. Keen, Asst. Cashier Anna Shollenberger, Clerk 

DIRECTORS 

R. O. Diehl 
John B. Hossler 
W. W. Moyer 
OUR TRUST DEPARTMENT CAN SERVE YOU AS 
Executor, Administrator, Assignee, Receiver, Guardian 
Agent, Attorney in Fact, Registrar 
OF STOCKS AND BONDS, ETC. 



H. M. Beamesderfer 
John R. Cassel 
Morris B. Ginder 



Jacob G. Hershey 
J. B. Shenk 



)QOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO( 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



McLaughlin Bros. 
DRAYMEN 


Trimmer's Great 
Bargain Emporium 


LOCAL, LONG DISTANCE HAULING 
26 Washington Street 


On the Square 


ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
BELL PHONE 39-R2 


ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 


MARTIN 

READY-MADE AND MADE-TO-ORDER 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 

CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS AND SHOES 


Elizabethtown Roller Mills 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 
FLOUR, CORN MEAL AND FEED 

J. V. BINKLEY, Propr. 


ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 


402-404 South Market St. 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Pa. 



[OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MOUNT JOY, PA. 



Thomas J. Brown 
Jacob S. Carmany 
H. H. Myers 
Abraham L. Nissley 



directors: 

Gabriel Moyer 
Jos. B. Hostetter 
B. S. Stauffer 
Jno. W. Newcomer 
Amos N. Musser 



H. Roy Nissley 
Jacob N. Hershey 
E. S. Gerberich 
Henry H. Eby 



Capital $125,000.00 



Surplus & Profits $150,000.00 



officers: 

THOMAS J. BROWN, President J. S. CARMANY, Vice President 

R. FELLENBAUM, Cashier 

4% Paid on Savings Accounts and Time Certificates. Resources $1,600,000 



*OOOOQOGOGQOCXXXXXXXX>QOOOOOQOGOCXX>OGOGOOOOOOQOCQOQOOOOOOOOOOOe 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SOUTH END QROCERY 

FRESH, FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES, CANDIES AND LUNCH GOODS 
"The little store with big business" i 

Levi C. Hershey 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



A. W. CAIN 

DRUGGIST 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 

THE BETTER REPAIRING OF THE 

BARNES SHOE SHOP 

WILL GRATIFY YOU 

It's Real Economy . 

43 South Market St ELIZABETHTOWN 

NISSLEY'S LUNCH & DINING ROOMS 

David D. Clare, Proprietor 

14-16 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER. PENNA, 



LANCASTER SCHOOL SUPPLY CO. 

L. B. Herr & Son 
Booksellers 

Stationeries 

Printers 

46-48 W. King St. LANCASTER, PA. 

THE GROSS 
CONFECTIONARY 

122 S. Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



BARD-BLANKENMYER CO., Inc. 

PLUMBING^HEATING 
and SHEET METAL WORK 



118 South Queen Street, 



LANCASTER, PA. 



GUNSMITH LOCKSMITH 

DOMNITZ BROS. 

If it's a (LOCK) key, we have it 
222 1£ N. Q. St. LANCASTER, PA. 



A. C. McLANACHAN 
BARBER 

21 E. High St 

Second Door From Post Office 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



BUCH MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



WE BUILD THE FOLLOWING GOODS IN 

THE COLLEGE TOWN 



Wheelbarrows, Corn Shelters, Wood Saws, 
Land Rollers, Pulverizers, Water Troughs 



HENRY L. GISE 



Notary Public, Surveyor and Conveyancer 

Insurance of all Kinds 

Agent for 

State Capital Savings and Loan 

Association 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



J. W. G. Hershey, Pres. 

J. Bitzer Johns, V. Pres. 

Henry R. Gibbel, Sec. & Treas. 



The Lititz Agricultural 

Mutual Fire 

Insurance Company 



Insures against Lightning, Storm and Firs 

Insurance in force $39,000,000 
Issues both Cash and Assessment Policies 



13 EAST MAIN STREET 
LITITZ, PENNA. 



PHONOGRAPHS 

We handle only one make and that is the 

EDISON £7, Y ai 

FISHER'S 

8 Centre Square 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



EBY SHOE COMPANY 

Incorporated 
Manufacturers of 

MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S 

FINE WELT AND TURNED 

SHOES 



LITITZ, 



PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



HEATING and PLUMBING 



Miller Pipeless Furnaces 

and 
Leader Water Systems 



LEO KOB 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

)QOQQQQQQQQQQOQQQ<ttQQQQQQQOQQQQQQQQQQOQQQQOQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQOQC 



J. W, ZRRPD88 

GENERAL HARDWARE 
Sporting & Housefurnishing Goods 



ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

POTTS DEPARTMENT STORE 
"EPHRATA'S BIGGEST BEST STORE" 

SHOES— Built for 
Comfort and Style 



EBERLY BROTHERS 
Ephrata, Pa. 



CHAS. K. MUSSER 



Electrical 
Contractor 

All Kinds of 

Electrical Supplies and Fixtures 

HOUSE WIRING A SPECIALTY 

The Ephrata Review 

$1.50 A YEAR 

Best Job Printing 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



Chas. S. Yeager, Propr. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



THE WILLEY COMPANY INC. 

Superior Laundry Machinery 



FACTORY COLUMBIA, PENNA. 



OFFICE PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



109 East King Street 




Lancaster, Penna. 



JACOB FISHER 

8 Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
WATCHMAKER & JEWELER 
With you for 40 years that's all 
From 10 to 20 per cent, lower than the 
lowest for the same grade of make. 




Seller's Kitchen Cabinet, the best ser- 
vant in your house. I have just received 
a half car load of above cabinets, which I 
will sell at Special reductions during Octo- 
ber and November. Call and see the Cabi- 
net, and get prices. 



H. S. HOTTENSTEIN, 
R. D. 2 ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



HERSHEY TRUST CO. 

HERSHEY, PENNA. 
Capital, Surplus and Profits $425,000.00 
Resources $3,500,000.00 
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 
M. S. Hershey, President 
W. H. Lebhicker, V. Pres. 
Ezra F. Hershey, V. Pres. 
S. C. Stechon, Treas. 
John A. Landis U. G. Risser, M.D. 

J. B. Leithiser John E. Snyder 

Wm. F. R. Murrie A. W. Stauffer 

Commercial Banking Department 
Saving Department Trust Department 

LARGEST CIRCULATION AND 
ADVERTISING PATRONAGE 

Elizabethtown Chronicle 

Fifty-one Years Old and Still Young 



Garrett, Miller & Co. 



Electrical 
Supplies 



N. E. Cor. Fourth & Orange St». 
WILMINGTON, -:- -:- DELAWARE 



WM. Z. ROY, Lancaster, Pa. 

Book Binder and Blank Book Manufacturer 



Date Order No 

Title 

Binding 

Owner. - . 

Residence Cost 



Remarks 








■ 

. 



awO 

.... 



The Builders 

All are architects of Fate, 

Working in these walls of time; 

Some with massive deeds and great, 
Some with ornaments of rhyme. 

Nothing useless is, or low; 

Each thing in its place is best; 
And what seems but idle show 

Strengthens and supports the rest. 

For the structure that we raise 
Time is with memorials filled; 

Our to-days and yesterdays 

Are the blocks with which we build. 

Truly shape and fashion these; 

Leave no yawning gaps between; 
Think not, because no man sees, 

Such things will remain unseen. • 

In the elder days of Art, 

Builders wrought with greatest care 
Each minute and unseen part; 

For the Gods see everywhere. 

Let us do our work as well 

Both the unseen and the seen; 

Make the house, where Gods may dwell, 
Beautiful, entire, and clean. 

Else our lives are incomplete, 
Standing in these walls of Time, 

Broken stairways, where the feet 
Stumble sts they seek to climb. 

Build to-day, then, strong and. sure, 
With a firm and ample base ; 

And ascending and secure 

Shall to-morrow find its place. 

Thus alone can we attain 

To those turrets, where the eye 

Sees the world as one vast plain, 
And one boundless reach of sky. 



'OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



tin ®§i,ikiii t tmi 



Volume XVII 



Number 1 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



Editor-in-Chief Jacob S. Harley 

Associate Editor Florence T. Moyer 

Departmental Editor H. H. Nye 

Alumni Editor L. W. Leiter 

Religious News Editor . .Ezra M. Wenger 

i Emma Ziegler 

School News < 

( Stanley Ober 

Business Manager J. Z. Herr 

Circulation Manager E. G. Meyer 



Our College Times is published monthly during the Academic year of Elizabeth- 
rtown College. 

This paper will have to be discontinued as soon as the time of subscription expires 
;as an action of the United States legislature. 

Please renew in time and report any change of address to the business manager. 

Subscription rates one dollar per year; fifteen cents per copy; six subscriptions 
$5.00 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



Literary 



Chapel Talk — Roger D. Winger 

"Making the 100 per cent. 

Investment" 

The purpose of a life to be in- 
vested one hundred per cent, for 
the welfare of the social order in 
which it finds itself is indeed a 
worthy and most noble one, and one 
which I trust has brought most of 
you within the environment of this 
Christian institution. This purpose, 



motivated by the desire to have the 
life most perfectly consecrated and 
adjusted in self-giving service for 
society, is from God, and it is with 
a sense of the divinity of service, 
that I commend it most earnestly to 
you this morning. 

To me, the greatest tragedy in all 
the world is the tragedy of a mis- 
spent life — for any individual to 
spend these few short days God has 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



allotted him in selfish indulgence 
and the gratification of carnal de- 
sires and to come to the end of days 
in remorse, with the keen realiza- 
tion that as far as his life as an in- 
vestment in behalf of society is con- 
cerned, it has been a miserable 
failure, I say, that's the greatest 
tragedy in all the world. 

I would that you could feel as I 
feel the tremendous responsibility 
involved in the investment of life. 
If I were a Hindu I might more 
carelessly invest my life. You know 
the Hindu believes in the theory of 
the transmigration of souls. Ac- 
cording to this theory my soul had 
a previous existence before it came 
into my present body, and it shall 
assume another form when the 
course of the present life is ended. 
It's my dread that when my soul shall 
leave the present form it shall pass 
into a lower state of existence. It's 
my hope that when it flees this 
tabernacle of clay it will pass into 
a higher state. Therefore when an 
Indian mother loses a son by 
death, and a snake comes crawling 
into the hut where she is working, 
she won't allow any one to injure 
that snake, for that may be her son 
coming to visit her. Now, if I were 
a Hindu, with such a philosophy of 
life, and believed that my soul had 
several existences, I might better 
justify myself in making a careless 
investment of life. But I'm not a 
Hindu. I'm a Christian, and be- 
cause I'm a Christian I believe I 
have but one life to invest, and that 
it makes an eternity of difference as 
to how that one life shall be in- 
vested. 



Did you ever stop to think just 
what it means to invest a life for 
eternity? It's not investing in terms 
of time, I assure you. You all know 
how limestone is formed. A little 
organism dies and its shell drops 
to the bottom of the sea. Countless 
millions of these organisms die ev- 
ery year and their shells drop to 
the bottom of the sea until, after en- 
ormous lapses of time, we have an 
immense deposit of limestone shells. 
After other ages, perhaps a great 
upheaval of the earth somehow 
brings enormous pressure to bear 
upon this deposit of limestone 
shells. Then the process of cementa- 
tion begins and after a thousand 
ages we have what we call lime- 
stone. So incomprehensible is the 
lapse of time that has passed since 
limestone began to be formed, that 
geologists tell us, were layer of 
limestone placed upon layer, we 
would have a huge column of lime- 
stone forty miles high. Yet all this 
is but a speck of time in the great 
ocean of eternity. The wonder of 
it all is that, still, man, only a crea- 
ture of the dust, presumes intel- 
ligence and feels so self-sufficient in 
making his investment of life that 
he is prone to grind and grill at the 
menial, the transient, the immedi- 
ate, the material, and the temporal 
things of life, and leave absolutely 
undiscovered and unexplored, the 
vast resources of the infinitude of 
heaven and eternity. 

Neither is the investing of a life 
for eternity, an investment in terms 
of space. Did you ever meditate 
upon the vast expanse of the uni- 
verse of heaven. Light travels at 
the rate of 186,000 miles per second. 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Now, don't try to take that in. The 
human mind can't conceive that. It 
only takes light eight minutes to ar- 
rive from the sun to the earth. So 
very inconceivable is the distance 
of some of the celestial bodies from 
the earth, that the Harvard as- 
tronomers announced recently a 
dispersion of light to have been 
seen which indicated that at 
least 200,000 years ago a great 
catastrophe had occurred and a 
great celestial body had been 
destroyed. This means that light 
from that shattered celestial body 
had been traveling for 200,000 
years and just recently arrived as 
messengers to announce that event 
of 200,000 years agone. 

Did you ever stop to think of the 
moon, 240,000 miles from the earth, 
revolving every 28 days around the 
earth; of the earth, 93,000,000 
miles from the sun — just one mile 
as astronomers think in terms of 
time, yearly revolving around the 
sun ; of the many other planets, sis- 
ter to the earth, with their respec- 
tive satellites (one, two, three, or 
four) revolving in fixed orbits about 
them ; of how all these planets with 
their satellites, together with our 
earth and moon, are revolving at a 
tremendous speed around the sun, 
comprising what we call the great 
solar system. 

But astronomers are beginning to 
tell us that the sun is the nearest 
fixed star. The reason why it ap- 
pears so large is that it is so close 
to us. They tell us that without 
much doubt all the other fixed stars 



well ordered systems ; that there is 
evidently a correlation of move- 
ment which indicates that our own 
solar system, with a speed of 11 
miles per second in company with 
the infinite number of other solar 
systems in their respective orbits; 
that all these systems revolving at 
an infinite speed through space 
around one great central Sun; and 
that that great central sun is 
Heaven. Now, who are you, or who 
am I, insignificant bits of frailty, 
that presuming to be intelligent we 
should grind, and grill at the men- 
ial, the transient, the immediate, 
the material, and the temporal 
things of life leave absolutely un- 
discovered and unexplored the vast 
resources of the infinitude of 
heaven. 

Folks, if life is worth investing 
at all, it is worth investing for 
eternity. We can not invest for 
eternity except as we invest in ser- 
vice for the highest good of society. 
I have confidence in you as young 
men and women who have met to- 
gether to find the highest and 
noblest things of life, that somehow 
you will get the vision, the strength 
and courage of purpose to make the 
100 per cent, investment. May Al- 
mighty God give you the strength 
and help you to do this thing we 
ask for Jesus sake. Amen. 



Heroes and Hero Worship 
Thomas Carlyle 



"The universal history of the 
are suns; that they have their re- world is the biography of great 
spective planets and satellites in men. All the accomplishments in 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



the world are the result of the em- 
bodiments of thoughts that divert 
in the great men sent into the 
world; the. soul of the whole world's 
history it may justly be considered 
were the history of the world." 

"Hero worship, heartfelt, pros- 
trate, admiration, submission, burn- 
ing, boundless for a noblest god-like 
form of man — is not that the germ 
of Christianity itself?" 

The above is in brief the content 
of Thomas Carlyle's wonderful 
production "Heroes and Hero Wor- 
ship." It is doubted whether we can 
fully appreciate this masterpiece, 
but the reader cannot fail to note a 
quality of greatness about it, some 
impelling force which holds the at- 
tention and interest even though at 
times it might become tedious. It 
is the burning message of the man 
himself to create and awake a 
greater appreciation and recogni- 
tion of the great souls whom the 
world has known and owned. He 
calls for a belief in the greatest man 
of the age, to discover him, honor 
and obey him. He challenges the 
loyalty of all people to these great 
souls, these heaven-sent leaders, 
and upon the loyalty and obedience 
to them he bases the success or 
failure of the future. 

Odin, the hero as Divinity, Ma- 
homet the hero as Prophet; Dante 
and Shakespeare the heroes as Poets. 
Luther, the hero as Priest, Johnson, 
Rosseau, Burns the heroes as men 
of Letters, Cromwell and Na- 
poleon, the heroes as Kings are 
given in a series of historical pic- 
tures, in vivid fascinating language. 
Through the striking portrayal our 



admiration of these men is quick- 
ened. We must recognize the great- 
ness of the men themselves and the 
worth of their work to the world. 
They are all characterized by a sin- 
cerity and perseverance which 
identifies itself with all true great- 
ness. Carlyle himself says, "I 
should say sincerity, a great, deep 
genuine sincerity, is the first char- 
acteristic of all men in anyway 
heroic." Their vision too, in that 
they were all men ahead of their 
times, henceforth unappreciated 
at the time, but considered doubly 
great now, is wonderful to us. 
Carlyle also says "For, in fact, I say 
the degree of vision that dwells in 
a man is a correct measure of the 
man." A consecration to valor is 
another characteristic of these 
heroes, a fearlessness to stand in 
the face of success and failure, to 
meet any difficulty, a deep-seated 
consecration to valor. Our ap- 
preciation of these great men is de- 
termined by the spark of greatness 
within ourselves, varying from 
small to large degree. In beautiful 
words Carlyle says of Dante : 
"Dante burns as a pure star fixed 
there in the firmament, at which 
the great and high of all the ages 
kindle themselves. He is the pos- 
session of all the chosen of the 
world for unaccounted time." 

By some people "Heroes and 
Hero-worship" is thought to be dull 
and uninteresting. It would rather 
seem that such a person was unable 
to appreciate such a masterpiece or 
had a poor conception of real 
worth. Our materialistic viewpoint 
tends to make us not appreciate the 
highly intellectual and spiritual. 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



We sometimes fail to understand 
and appreciate the wonderful and 
the great when it is in our very 
presence and possession. As Carlyle 
said "the times call loudly for the 
great man — when we find him the 
critics try to "account" for him, call 
him a creature of the times." "No 
sadder proof can be given by a man 
of his own littleness than disbelief 



in great men." The negative of this 
reveals the source of Carlyle's own 
greatness. He did believe in great 
men and it proved his own great na- 
ture. He lived with a divine spirit- 
ual light, and the message of his 
life through his works was truth 
and its pursuance and rightful wor- 
ship of the good and great. 



Editorials 



Sunsets 

Ever since there has been lan- 
guage and art, sunsets have been 
the subject of both poet and paint- 
er. Their splendor, what words can 
describe? Their beauty what brush 
can portray? Oh, the beauty of the 
sunset on these bright perfect Sep- 
tember days! Who can describe its 
splendor, the beauty of its colors, 
the wonder of it as it changes each 
moment -before our eyes. When 
poets have failed we hesitate to at- 
tempt to word its awe-inspiring 
beauty and glory. 

Do we appreciate the beauties of 
nature as we might? Many of the 
beautiful things in this world have 
been produced by the mind and 
hand of man. Only the fortunate 
few have the ability to and the 
privilege of enjoying them, but the 
creator in his love has planned that 
the beauties of nature be enjoyed 
by all "without money and without 
price." The enjoyment derived 
from a beautiful sunset will never 
be a thing of the past, for "a thing 
of beauty is a joy forever." 



A day is often spoken of as 
symbolical of a lifetime. Is it not a 
beautiful thought that a life rightly 
lived shall some day merge into the 
infinite as the day dies in silence 
and glory. 

There is no death ! The Stars go 
down 
To rise upon some fairer shore 
And bright in heaven's jeweled 
crown 
They shine forevermore. 

—J. O. 



Crossing The Bar 

Sunset and evening star, 
And one clear call for me! 

And may there be no moaning at 
the bar, 
When I put out to sea. 

But such a tide as moving seems 
asleep, • 
Too full for sound and foam, 
When that which drew from out. 
the boundless deep 
Turns again home. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



Twilight and evening bell, 
And after that the dark! 

And may there be no sadness of 
farewell, 
When I embark. 



For though from out our bourne of 
time and place 
The flood may bear me far, 
I hope to see my Pilot face to face 
Whsn I have crossed the bar. 

— Alfred Tenhyson. 



Religious Notes 



Religious Activity 

A school becomes neither better 
or worse by merely instituting re- 
ligious activities. There must also 
be that true spirit which vitalizes 
and energizes it. The closer the in- 
dividual grows to these various ac- 
tivities the more they will benefit 
him. 

If we receive no benefit from any 
of the religious activities it is be- 
cause we either are indifferent 
about them and never bring any 
contribution to them or we do not 
understand the purpose of the sev- 
eral religious activities. 

The Sunday School has a purpose 
and fills a definite place. The 
Prayer meeting has a high and 
noble purpose and is indespensable 
to Christian men and women. 

All religious activities are an out 
growth of a heart-felt need or a 
great desire. The assembling to- 
gether of Christians for prayer is 
an outgrowth of a desire to get very 
close to God. They hunger and 
thirst after righteousness. It is also 
an outgrowth of a need. They all 
realize that they need God's help 
daily, to solve problems, to guide 
and to bring consolation. The ex- 
tent to which men and women rea- 



lize this need is oftentimes a meas- 
ure of their Christianity. 

Surely if the purpose of a Prayer 
meeting is so easily understood then 
the purpose of all other religious 
activities may likewise be under- 
stood. Therefore if one does still 
take no part it must be because of 
an indifferent attitude. It may be 
that every one is in attendance but 
their heart is not there and conse- 
quently are not benefitted. To re- 
ceive benefit and spiritual nourish- 
ment from any religious activity one 
must contribute by giving attention 
to what others bring and also bring 
something himself. 

No one can receive any benefit or 
at least very little benefit if he is 
not closely connected. The success 
of any student depends in part upon 
the success of the school he attends 
and also the success of the school 
depends on the success of the stu- 
dents. The most vital activities 
which contribute to the greatest 
success of either are the spiritual. 
This being true, individual success is 
insured in so far as the several stu- 
dents take part in the religious ac- 
tivities which will in their turn send 
them out into many other lines of 
activity. 

— E. Wenger. 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



By the faith which the flowers show 
When they bloom unbidden; 

By the calm of the rivers flow 

From a source that is hidden; 

By th§ courage of wild birds' wings 
On the long migrations; 

By the strength of the tree as it 
clings 
To the deep foundation, 

So teach me Lord, to Build My Life. 

Newville Sunday School 

The exercise of one's powers 
tends to strengthen those powers, 
be they physical, intellectual or 
spiritual. The Newville Sunday 
School is an example of this prin- 
ciple. This Sunday School is con- 
stantly regaining its former spirit 
and progress, under the able and 
enthusiastic leadership of Superin- 
tendent Stanley Ober and his corps 
of teachers, namely Ruth Minnich, 
Elizabeth Ziegler. Enos Weaver, 
Margaret Oellig, Mr. Brightbill and 
Prof. Harley. 

It is difficult to find a more beau- 
tiful walk than that leading to 
Newville. The satisfaction derived 
from an afternoon of work at New- 
ville equals the pleasure of the 
work. These two facts should be 
an inducement to all students to 
form the habit of lending support 
to Newville. 

A Children's Day service will be 
given in the near future. To this 
service and to the preaching service 
held every fourth week all are 
cordially invited. 

Stevens Hill Sunday School 

The Stevens Hill Sunday School 
is very well equipped for Sunday 
School purposes. The four small 



class rooms each contain small 
chairs and blackboards which aid 
greatly in teaching. 

The primary department consists 
of both beginners and primary chil- 
dren. Aside from the blackboard, 
a picture roll and cards are pro- 
vided for this department. 

The Sunday School maintains a 
library for the use of the children. 
The papers "Our Young People" 
and "Our Boys and Girls" are also 
distributed in the Sunday School. 

Brother Clayton Frey is superin- 
tendent of this school, he is also 
teacher of the Men's and Women's 
Bible Class. His staff of teachers 
consists of Emma Ziegler chorister 
and teacher, John Sherman and 
Vera Hackman. 

A preaching service follows Sun- 
day School every other Sunday. The 
future of Stevens Hill is promising 
for the community is apt to teach- 
ing and the teachers are loyal and 
spirited. 



School Activities 
K. L. S. 

The Keystone Literary Society 
was called into action on the first 
Saturday evening of this new year 
by the President, Mr. Horace Raf- 
fensperger. On the 11th of Sept. 
the first public session was held and 
a very interesting program ren- 
dered. The Society is continually 
increasing in number and zeal, as 
seen by the enrollment of new mem- 
bers. At this first meeting, forty 
signed the constitution and were 
admitted as active members of the 
Society. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



After the program, Rev. John 
Hershey, a former student and 
graduate of Elizabethtown College 
and formerly a member of the Key- 
stone Literary Society, gave a short 
talk and encouraged the Society in 
its work. 

The second meeting on the 18th, 
was a private meeting, consisting of 
the election of new officers and 
parliamentary drill. Mr. Clarence 
Holsopple, the newly-elected Presi- 
dent, took his chair on the evening 
of the 25th in a public session. New 
committees were appointed and one 
new member admitted to the So- 
ciety, after which a very pleasing 
program was rendered. 

— E. T. 

Play Ball! 

What do you say, lets go, put it 
across ! strike one ! Strike two ! 
Three ! Mans out, side retired, 
Again we go ! 

Nearly every night since the 
early part of September, noises and 
shouts similar to the above were 
heard coming from the lower cam- 
pus ball grounds. 

The teams, organizer under Prof. 
Hoffer, director of Boys Physical Cul 
ture, consist of two first and two 
second teams. The first teams are 
captained by their pitchers, Zendt 
and Myers, respectively. The 
second teams likewise with Bechtel 
and Ziegler pitching. 

All the first team games were 
hotly contested, several games re- 
sulted in draws; Zendt's team won 
the first four games and Myer's 
team, just awake, won the next 
three. The second team games were 
evenly divided and very interesting, 



since almost every one scored or hit. 
Zug's glass eye and Zendt's glass 
arm are the outstanding features of 
the game to date. 

—A. T. M. 

Senior Notes 

The school year of 1920-21 has 
opened, bringing to the Hill 45 
Seniors. The number will hardly 
come up to that of last year, but it 
is said — Students should not be 
counted, they should be weighed, so 
we hope to equal and even surpass 
in quality of mental exertion, our 
predecessors. Of this number 14 
are Commercial Students, 16 Sew- 
ing Students and 15 Pedagogical 
Students. By October we expect to 
increase our number of Pedagogical 
Students to 16 by having B. Mary 
Royer, a returned Missionary from 
India enter our ranks. 

Due to the limited amount of 
time since school has opened, very 
little could be accomplished as a 
class, but we have met and or- 
ganized. The organization resulted 
in the following elections. Presi- 
dent, John Sherman; Vice Pres. 
Oliver Zendt; Secretary, Laura 
Hershey ; Treasurer. Harriet 
Eberley. 

We have selected our pins and 
,colors which are brown and buff. 
A beautiful pennant also has been 
designed. 

A fine spirit has been manifested 
thus far throughout, this work, 
which spirit we hope will continue 
through the year. 

— L. H. 

Social 

On Tuesday night September 21st 
the gym was the scene of a Recep- 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



tion to the Students. Beautiful 
decorations of trailing vines com- 
pletely transformed the room into 
a fragrant verdant bower. A short 
social period was spent during 
which music was furnished by the 
victrola and refreshments . of ice 
cream and cake were served. 

Thanks ! 

The new meat house at the rear 
of Alpha Hall has been completed 
and, since its completion, has been 
the site of great activity. On one 
particular day apple-butter was 
boiled, several good friends from 
town having come out to assist in 
the making. We appreciate their 
help and what they accomplished. 
Forty-one crocks of apple butter 
were the result of the day. 



The College Lecture Course 

It is with much satisfaction that 
the Library Committee of the Col- 
lege has secured a stronger course 
than ever for this season, consisting 
of six numbers all of which are to 
be given in the town Hall, thus giv- 
ing our many friends and patrons in 
town the advantage. 

The opening number is Miss Mar- 
garet Stahl, who will read Abra- 
ham Lincoln on Thursday evening, 
October 14. 

Dr. Herbert Cope, the noted 
humorist will give one of his famous 
lectures on Friday evening, Nov. 
19, as the second number. 

Dr. Russell Conwell is to give his 



great lecture on "Acres of Dia- 
monds," as the third number. The 
date is not. definitely fixed, but 
is planned for an evening near the 
middle of January during the Bible 
Institute. 

Mr. Logan, the renowned car- 
toonist is to appear on Tuesday 
night, February 1st, depicting some 
of the familiar poems of our well- 
known poets. 

Dr. Chun, a noted scholar from 
China, is to appear on Monday 
evening, March 21st. 

Prof. Maliore, an Educator from 
the Phillipines is to give his il- 
lustrated lecture on his native coun- 
try, sometime in April. The exact 
date will be announced later. 

The committee are offering these 
six numbers in season ticket for 
$2.00, and are hopeful that the 
town and vicinity will fully support 
this effort to bring to our town the 
high grade of talent on the lecture 
platform. This is by far the most 
expensive course that has ever been 
attempted. Dr. Conwell's regular 
fee for this lecture being $200.00, 
it will easily be seen that the com- 
mittee have spared no expense in 
building this course. 

The solicitors will soon be calling 
on the friends of town and vicinity 
to solicit your order for a season 
ticket. May we ask your liberal 
support and patronage. The net 
proceeds, if any, will be used for 
the College library. 

College Library Committee 

H. K. Ober, Chairman. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



Departmental Notes 



The Educational Values of the 
Social Sciences 

Every age in the development of 
education has had its peculiar view- 
point in regard to human values. 
Recent education is distinguished 
by the social viewpoint. In the 
preceding era educational . work 
was distinctly psychological and in- 
dividualistic in its nature. This 
type of education was cultural in its 
effect. It aimed to develop the in- 
dividual to the end that the highest 
self might be realized in regard to 
culture. It emphasized method 
rather than content in the learning 
process. The Social viewpoint in 
education emphasizes aim rather 
than method or content. But a 
change of aim in education also in- 
volves a change of content. 

As to aim it may be said that our 
present era of education em- 
phasizes the need of equipping the 
student to fill the largest place in 
society rather than to give him 
mere knowledge. As to content it 
may be said that the formal and dis- 
ciplinary studies are being elimin- 
ated to give way to the socializing 
and practical studies. _ In other 
words, such studies as dead lan- 
guages and abstract mathematics 
are being displaced by the social 
and other practical sciences. 

Since society is becoming more 
and more democratic, there is a 
growing need for social education. 
There is a loud cry for better citi- 
zenship "Yet our schools have been 
strangely indifferent to the need of 



a specific social and political edu- 
cation. Good citizenship, by which 
is meant not only intelligent voting, 
important as that is, but efficient 
membership in a community, ef- 
ficient fatherhood and motherhood, 
and in general, fitness for com- 
munity and national service, has un- 
til recently been given very in- 
adequate attention in our schools. 
Education has not helped to solve 
our social problems as it should 
have done." 

In a democracy there is great 
need of knowledge of human beings 
in their various relationships. We 
are living in a social world more 
than in a world of physical objects 
and material things. Social know- 
ledge is worth more than any other 
sort of knowledge because our chief 
adjustments have to be made more 
to men and to institutions than to 
things. Human relationships make 
or mar the world we know. 

Dr. Chas. A. Ellwood says: "At 
least one-third of the time of the 
curriculum from the elementary 
grades to the end of the A. B. col- 
lege Course should be devoted to 
such studies. From the standpoint 
of knowledge, they represent the 
most important part of the in- 
dividual's training for intelligent 
citizenship. They should not be 
withheld from the child, even if 
some of the traditional subjects in 
curriculum suffer. Nor should they 
be taught, except possibly in some 
of the grades, indirectly, by merely 
giving to some of the older subjects 
in the curriculum a more social con- 



•20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



tent and direction. This latter may 
be desirable, but if -accepted, as 
sufficient, the newer social studies 
will be inadequately taught. No 
school or College, so far as the writer 
knows, has, however, yet accepted 
the educational revolution of mak- 
ing social ctudies fundamental in its 
curriculum. Even as electives they 
are usually given very inadequate 
recognition, except in cases where 
they come in as professional 
studies." 

The social studies that are re- 
ceiving most emphasis this year in 
our college curriculum are history, 
civics, economics, social psychology, 
educational sociology and rural so- 
ciology. All of these are intended 
to develop a scientific attitude hu- 
man affairs and all endeavor to "set 
forth the principles of healthful hu- 
man progress and welfare. History 
sets forth the facts of human prog- 



ress. Civics sets forth the duties of 
practical citizenship in a de- 
mocracy. Social psychology studies 
the activities of the social mind re- 
sulting from the interplay of in- 
dividual minds in consequence of 
their association. Educational so- 
ciology applies the principles of so- 
ciology to the field of education to 
the end that the school might be- 
come the largest possible factor in 
human progress. Rural sociology 
endeavors to set forth a program of 
constructive action that shall result 
in making the country a better- 
place in which to live. Economics 
sets forth the laws that govern the 
business world. All of these point 
out and seek to inculcate social 
values. Social education means, 
then, moral education ; for it will be 
education into community, national 
and human ideals. 

— H. H. N. 



School Notes 



School opened on Sept. 6, in the 
midst of showers of blessings, 
nevertheless we are all settled and 
started on our journey of thirty- 
eight weeks, of school life. 

We are glad to see some old faces 
among the student body and we 
also welcome the new ones and 
wish them all the joys that accom- 
pany school life. 

A get acquainted social was held 
on the evening of Sept. 6, to chase 
away the "blues," if it were pos- 
sible that anyone could have them. 
Besides a getting acquainted game 



some of the teachers gave short 
messages. 

What a mastering factor is 
"mental set," for time and again 
you can hear on the halls "Miss 
Crouthamel, Oh ! I mean Mrs. Hof- 
fer." 

Our chapel services are very 
helpful and inspiring. Many help- 
ful suggestions are thrown out in 
these services. 

The watchword of the students 
of Memorial Hall is "Pep." They 
scraped the tennis courts in four 
hours and mowed the ball diamond 
in two hours. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



On Sunday evening Sept. 12. 
Prof. L. W. Leiter preached in the 
Chapel. This was the first service 
of its kind this school year. The 
interest of the town folks and stu- 
dent body was fine, as practically 
every seat' in the room was oc- 
cupied. 

Mr. Beck in English class wrote 
the following sentence on the 
board; "Even he who has com- 
mitted the most outrageous crime 
has a still heart." (has still a heart) 

(In Psychology) Mr. R. "Why do 
chickens and cows run across the 
road when followed by an auto- 
mobile. Mr. M. "That's an instinct 
to get home." 

The boys are ending the base- 
ball season with some of the fastest 
games yet seen on the hill. Two 
first teams have been organized ; 
also two second teams. 

Prof. Hoffer does not like fried 
potatoes for breakfast as was 
shown one night at the supper table 
when he left one drop nicely on the 
floor so the cat would get it. 

Misses H. and H. have not yet 
become accustomed to College ra- 
tions. Ask them about potatoes. 

On Saturday night Sept. 19, the 
school enjoyed a rare treat. All 
started on a moonlight hike, but 
before returning, their steps were 
directed into a field where they 
gathered some wood ready to light. 
Soon the flames leaped high and 
marshmallows appeared which ere 
long disappeared. Playing games 
and telling stories also were a part 
of the entertainment. Yes, we like 
moonlight nights. 



Doc's frequent expression is "dit- 
to." Of course he means "Dot." 
(Dorothy). 

Our sympathy goes out to Prof. 
W. who informs us that his health 
suffered greatly from visiting so 
many parlors this summer. 

Prof. Hoffer warns us against 
mis-pronouncing Mr. Oral Xerxes 
Hollopeter's name. Ask him or the 
girls for the proper pronunciation. 

The faculty gave a reception on 
the evening, Sept. 21 in the "gym," 
which was greatly enjoyed by all. 
However we missed the accustomed 
presence of our President, Prof. H. 
K. Ober, who is in Japan. 

Mr. John Graham paid a visit to 
his Alma Mater recently, before re- 
turning to Bethany Bible School, 
where he has been a student the 
past year. We wish him success 
in his work. 

Miss Fogelsanger coming up from 
supper was heard to exclaim, "O 
girls, I found a weasel in the 
macaroni. 

Wanted! An alarm to keep me 
awake while studying. Signed, J. 
Aldus. 

— E. Z.— S. O. 



Sermons and Scraps 

He is great who is what he is 
from nature, and who never re- 
minds us of others. 



Idleness is the rust that attaches 
itself to the most brilliant metal. 



Appealing is the suggestion that 
old maids should be self possessed. 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Few people can do two things at 
once. That is why it is so difficult 
to forgive and forget. 



If you will always look at the 
stars you will not see the muddy 
places in the road. 



Health Hints 



A person who gives voluminous 
attention to his soul but neglects his 
teeth, is not likely to prove very 
convincing in an argument. 

When the meat is too tough for 
consumption in the ordinary way, 
the wise college cook has a make- 
shift; she has it hashed. 

A hair in the head is worth ten 
in the brush. N 

Some folks though not weighed 
down with sorrow, yet wear their 
finger nails in mourning. 



A Receipt for a Day 

Take a little dash of water cold, 

And a little leaven of prayer, 
And a little bit of sunshine gold 

Dissolved in the morning air 
Add to your meal some merriment 

And a thought for kith and kin, 
And then, as your prime ingredient, 

A plenty of work thrown in 
But spice it all with the essence of 
love, 

And a little whiff of play, 
Let a wise old book and a glance 
above 

Complete the well-made day. 



Alumni Notes 



Fellow Alumni! We greet you in 
the name of our Alma Mater! We 
bring to you her good wishes ! The 
editor of this department after a 
two years' absence returns to ren- 
der service to his Alma Mater and 
in this capacity to render service to 
you. In our absence we found the 
Alumni Notes of Our College Times 
of greatest interest. This is the ex- 
perience of all of us and it is natural 
inasmuch as the new student-body 
is to a large extent unknown to the 
Almuni. We want to know of the 
activities of our comrades of past 
years. We shall keep this fact con- 
stantly in mind and attempt ac- 
cordingly to give you news items 
sufficient from time to time to keep 



us closely in touch with our fellow 
alumni. This is a large task but 
each of you can help in the attempt. 
It is only by your help that we shall 
succeed. Do you realize that your 
comrades are just as much inter- 
ested in your activities as you are 
in theirs? Then you write to the 
editor giving an account of the 
facts in your years' activities w T hich 
you should like to know of your 
comrade. Thus this shall be able 
to be a monthly letter from your 
fellow Alumni and shall be just 
what your editor was accustomed 
to expect and what each of you 
look for and expect in these 
columns. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



President H. K. Ober, '08, is 
away on leave of absence on a trip 
to Tokio, Japan an attendance, at 
the World Sunday School Conven- 
tion as a representative of the Sun- 
day School interests of our church. 
We can be congratulated upon the 
fact that one of our own number 
has thus been honored with the 
responsibility of representation to a 
Sunday School convention of world 
wide interest. 

J. G. Meyer, '05, has been im- 
powered by the Board of Trustees 
in the absence of President Ober to 
act as Chairman of the Faculty and 
to direct the activities of the Col- 
lege. 

J. Z. Herr, '05, has returned to 
head the Commercial Department. 
He has reorganized this department 
on a plane superior to the ordinary 
business Colleges and on a level 
with any college doing Commercial 
work. He has organized a Teacher's 
Commercial Course and a College 
Commercial Course besides the 
regular courses. 

Ezra Wenger, '19, has been se- 
lected to head the Department of 
Religious Education and Bible be- 
sides being preceptor. 

A. C. Baugher, '17 is Professor 
of Physics and chemistry. 

J. I. Baugher, '20, is in charge of 
Elementary Mathematics and 
Methods. Prof. Baugher and fam- 
ily will move into one side of the 
new double dwelling being erected 
by the College on the lot adjoining 
to Dr. Reber's former home. 

Emma Cashman Wampler, '09, 
has returned to her Alma Mater to 
assume charge of Drawing and Art. 
he will occupy one of the Apart- 



metns of the New Apartment House 
when completed. Her studio will 
likewise be located in this building. 
Besides the above the following 
are continuing their services to 
■ their Alma Mater: H. H. Nye, '12, 
Professor of History and Social 
Science; L. W. Leiter, '09, Professor 
of Biology and Latin; Floy Crouth- 
amel Hoffer, '10; Preceptress and 
Librarian; Jennie Miller Via, '09, 
Teacher of Voice and Vocal Music; 
Mildred Bonebrake, '17; Teacher 
of Shorthand and Typewriting. 

Marriages 

Cupid has been especially active 
among our alumni this summer in 
consummating marriages. We fear 
we may have missed some. If we 
have we don't do so intentionally. 
Will some one just please inform 
us and we will be glad to add all 
to our list of happy alumni. We 
wish all the rich blessings of happy 
married life., 

A. C. Baugher, '17, and Ella C. 
Booz, '20. They will reside on Col- 
lege Hill in one of the apartments 
as soon as that building is finished. 

Floy S. Crouthamel, '10, and 
Irvin S. Hoffer, a graduate of Har- 
vard University. Mr. and Mrs.. 
Hoffer are living in Alpha Hall, 
College Hill. 

Paul K. Hess, '15, and Ruth S. 
Bucher, '16, Mr. and Mrs. Hess will 
be at home in Elizabethtown after 
December 1, in their beautiful new 
house built at the north edge of 
town. 

Albert L. Reber, '13, and Edna 
Brubaker, '14. They will live in 
Chicago, where Mr. Reber is en- 
gaged in business. 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Darby Brand Canned Foods Are Quality 
Packed. Packed Exclusively For 

Comly, Flanigen & Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 

118 & 120 So., Delaware Ave., Phila. 

Ask Your Dealer For Darby Brand 
A Trial will convince 



A. B. DRACE 

PAINTER 

AND 

PAPER HANGER 

S. Market St. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



JOLLEGE JEWELRY OF THE BETTER 
SORT 

J. F. APPLE CO. 

MANUFACTURING 
JEWELER 

CLASS PINS & JEWELRY PRIZE CUPS, 

FRATERNITY JEWELRY MEDALS 

120 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 

DR. S. S. HEINDEL 

DENTIST 

Out-of-Town Thursday, Friday 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 

A. B. ROOT 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



>00000000O0OO00O00OCK>O00000O0OOOOOOO0OO(XX>00OOOOOOOOOO0OOCX>00j 

FOR PHOTOGRAPHS 

CALL AT BISHOP'S 

New and Modern Studio 

Elizabethtown, Penna. 
We Guarantee All Work 

See us before having your diploma or those pictures framed. 

AMATEUR FINISHING SOLICITED 

EASTMAN LINE OF KODAKS AND FILMS FOR SALE 



'OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



CHAS. B. DIEROLF 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



Franklin & Marshall College 

LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 
Offers Liberal Courses in Arts and Sciences 

Campus of 54 acres with ten buildine-s 
including Gymnasium and complete Ath- 
letic Field. 

For Catalogue apply to 
HENRY H. APPLE, D.D., LL.D., Pre*. 

GO TO 

HORSFS 

CENTRE SQUARE 

for 

Oysters, Ice Cream, Confectionery 

GANSMAN'S 

Corner North Queen and Orange Streets 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



Men's Reliable Outfitters 

Suits To Order From 
Thirty To Sixty Dollars 



Mfgrs. of Plain Clothing for 39 years 
ONE PRICE — Always the Lowest 

THE BEST THERE IS IN 

HARDWARE 

At the Lowest Possible Price 
BOGGS' QUALITY HARDWARE STORE 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



GO TO 

GUY The BARBER 

HE'S ON THE SQUARE 

Waterman Fountain Pens 

— AT— 

Ream's Book Store 

Y. M. C. A. BUILDING 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



H. H. GOOD 

Gentral Meat Market 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 

Bell Phone 31R4 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

LANCASTER SANITARY MILK CO. 



PASTURIZED MILK 

AND 
CREAMERY BUTTER 



PURITY ICE CREAM 

North and Frederick Sts. 
BOTH PHONES, LANCASTER, PA. 

CLOTHING FOR THE MAN OR BOY 

Complete line of 

SUITS & OVERCOATS 

Suits made to your measure. Men's 

furnishing a specialty. Best make of Shoes 

of all kinds for Men, Ladies and Children. 

Agent for first-class Laundry 



J. N. OLWEILER 
Near Centre Square Elizabethtown 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



EAT 

Gilrizentiatfser's Bread 



Delivered by 



E. C. HEILMAN 



Opposite P. R. R. Station Elizabethtown 



Save Your Money by Bringing Your Shoes 

to 

E. W. MILLER 

DEALER IN SHOE FINE 

All Kinds of 

Old Shoe Repairing Neatly Done 

221 South Market Street 

ELIZABETHTOWN, :-: :-: PENNA. 



LUMBER 

AND 

MILL WORK 



We saw timbers 80 ft. and longer and 
deliver a barn complete in a couple weeks. 



B. F. Hiestand & Sons 



MARIETTA, 



PENNA. 



When In Need Of 

SHOES 

WHICB WILL GIVE YOU EXTREMELY L0\G WEAR COME TO 

The W. A. Withers Shoe Co. 

OLD MARKET HOUSE BLDG. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Prompt, Caretul Attention Given To Mail Orders 

sooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooJ 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



27 



LEBANON 



BOLOGNA 



COMPANY 




Lebanon, Penna. 



CLASS PINS AND RINGS 

For Colleges, High Schools, Sunday 
Schools, etc. Illustrated catalog mailed 
upon request. We are also Headquarters 
for Colleges and High School pennants. 
Let us know your wants. 

UNION EMBLEM CO. 
Dept. 89, Palmyra, Pa. 



Imade on honor-built for SERVICEl 



Base Ball and Lawn Tennis Goods 

Foot Ball and Basket Ball Goods 

Sporting Goods Of All Kinds 

Books, Stationery and Office 

Supplies 

DUTWEILERS 

813 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, :-: :-: PENNA. 



WHATEVER YOU NEED IN 

MERCHANDISE 

ALWAYS GO TO 

GREENBLATT'S DEPT. STORE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 
IT WILL PAY YOU 



oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 

DEMY & DETRA 

Dealers in 

FARM IMPLEMENTS AND REPAIRS, HUBER TRACTORS, GASOLINE AND 
OIL ENGINES, HAND AND POWER PUMPS 




Ind. Phone 628 
Bell Phone 63-R2 



28 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Conducted on Sanitary Principles 

is the 

RALPH GROSS 

SHAVING PARLOR 

Agency for Manhattan Laundry 



It pays to follow one's best light 
— to put God and Country First, 
ourselves afterwards. 

G. C. Armstrong 



LEHMAN & WOLGEMUTH 
COR L 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED and FLOUR 
BOTH 'PHONES ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



JOHN M. SHOOKERS 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 

Repairing a Specialty 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 



Kodaks & Films Stationery 

H. K. DORSHEIMER 

Confections Athletic Goods 



>oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo^ 

PIANOS-VICTROLAS 

Musical Instruments of Every Description 
Our Line Is Complete 



32 Makes of Pianos, 40 Styles 

Victor, Cheney, Star, Franklin and Solotone Phonograph 
Popular Sheet Music 9c a Copy 



CASH OR EASY PAYMENT PLAN 



KIRK JOHNSON & CO. 

16-18 W. King Street LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 

)OOQOQQOOO(X>OQOOQQQQQQQQQQQQQOQOOQQOOQOQQOOQOOOOQOOQOOOOOOOOQ t 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



29 



DODGE BROTHERS MOTOR CARS 
R. H. FORNEY 
GARAGE AND REPAIR SHOP 
On North Market Street , 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

_ , . _• ; ■, «J 



Kwick-Lite 
Flashlights 



Kyanize 

Floor Finish 



Joseph H, Rider & Son 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

FOR GOOD EATS 

CALL AT 

Hornafiiis' Restaurant 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

OYSTERS IN SEASON 

ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 

IT WILL PAY YOU TO VISIT 

HIRSH & BR0. 

Centre Square, 



LANCASTER 



for 



Ready-Made and Made-to-Order 

Clothing tor Men and Boys 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

We are one of the largest manufacturers of 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

in the United States 
Strictly One Price To All 

Established in 1854 



KIEFFER & LANDIS 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

Real Estate 

Insurance Collections 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



BOOKS BIBLES 

STATIONERY 

Phonographs 



I. A. SHIFFER 



39 S. Market St. 



Elizabethtown 



COLLEGE HILL DAIRY 
PURE MILK AND CREAM 

Delivered Daily 

S. G. GRAYBILL 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

H. H. BRANDT 

Dealer in all kinds of 
BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE AND 
ROOFING PAPER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, ■-:- PENNA. 

CENTRAL 
MUSIC STORE 



Victrolas, Grafonolas, Records, Stringed 
Instruments, Stationery, Kodaks, Eastman 
Films, Waterman Fountain Pens and 
Greeting cards. 

Films Developed and Primed 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- -:- PENNA. 



30 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXXXXXXX>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXX300000^ 

H. C. Schock, President J. E. Longenecker, V. President 

H. N. Nissly, Cashier 

SECURITY PROGRESS 

UNION NATIONAL MOUNT JOY BANK 



MOUNT JOY, 



PENNA. 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus and Profits $264,000.00 

Deposits $1,324,871.00 

An Honor Roll National Bank, Being 421 in Strength in the United States and 

2nd in Lancaster County 

Resources $2,165,000.00 

All Directors Keep in Touch With the Bank's Affairs 

The Bank Board Consists of the Following: 

H. C. Schock Eli F. Grosh I. D. Stehman Christian L. Nissley 

J. E. Longenecker John G. Snyder . J. W. Eshleman Johnson B. Keller 

T. M. Breneman Eli G. Reist Samuel B. Nissley S. N. Mumma 

Rohrer Stoner 

WE PAY 4% INTEREST ON CERTIFICATES AND SAVINGS 



SCHMIDT 
BAKERY 



Harrisburg, Pa 



WHY PAY RENT 



When I can offer you any kind of a 
home from a small property to a 300-acre 
farm at a right price. The interest, taxes 
and insurance on a home will be far less 
than the amount of rent you are paying, 
so why not buy and buy now? If interested 
in buying or selling real estate it will be 
to your advantage to see me. 



JNO. E. SCHROLL 



Both Phones 



Mount Joy, Pa. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



31 



%OOC30000CXXXXXXXXX)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXXX>000000000000( 




We Are Manufacturers of 

Doors and Window Frames, Doors and Sash, Mouldings, Dressers, Shutters and 

Blinds, Porch Work and Columns, Screens and Storm Sash, Hotbed 

Sash, Stair Work and Interior Finish 

And Dealers In 

Rough Lumber, Flooring and Ceiling, Fir Porch Flooring, Building Lime, Sand, 

Plaster, White Finish, Hydrated Lime, Brick, Cement, Asbestos, 

Asphalt, and Roll Roofing, Slate, Wall Board 

WE SPECIALIZE IN THE MANUFACTURE OF 

Shipping Cases and Tobacco Shooks 



We solicit your business and aim to give you prompt and satisfactory ser- 
vice on short notice. It is not necessary that we build for you in order to 
sell you the material; call to see us or 'phone when in the market for any- 
thing in our line and we shall be only too glad to give you our best service. 

Ask for our suggestions and we will cheerfully help you in planning your 
new buildings or remodeling your old ones. 

ELIZABETHTOWN PLANING MILL 

HOFFER BROS., Proprietors 



Bell Phone 3R5 
Independent 646A 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC( 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Hertzler's Department Store 

N. E. CORNER CENTRE SQUARE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 




Always Ready to Supply Your Needs Satisfactorily in 
DRY GOODS, STAPLE AND FANCY NOTIONS, BEST GROCERIES, FRUITS, 
SWEETMEATS, SHOES, WINDOW SHADES, QUEENSWARE, MEN'S 
WOMEN'S, BOYS' AND GIRL'S CLOTHING, OIL CLOTH, LINO- 
LEUM, CARPETS, RUGS, ETC. 

Goods displayed on three floors and separate carpet store, three doors 
east of Post Office. 

Agents for made to measure clothing- — International Tailoring Co. of New 
York. 

We carry full stocks notwithstanding the great difficulty in obtaining 
goods at these high prices. 

Long experience in merchandising goe with prices of goods purchased here. 

HERTZLER BROS. 



8 



CXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX3000000000000000000000000000000 

J. Hoffman Garber Benj. F. Garber 

GARBER GARAGE 



Bell Phone 43R2 

AUTHORIZED 

SALES 

AND 

SERVICE 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 




Ind. Phone 605A 

GENUINE 

FORD 

PARTS 

ACCESSORIES 



Our Repair Department Is Complete with the Latest Ford Approved Machinery 
Ford Prices Used All Work Guaranteed 

rooooooooooooooooooooooooooo'oooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 



KLEIN'S 

Milk Chocolate 

Almond Bars 



"The Milkiest Kind of Milk Chocolate" 



00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 

MUTH BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN 

COAL, FLOUR, FEED and LUMBER 

Our Special Domino Feed 

We aim to give a square deal that will merit 
your trade and friendship 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENNA. 

)O0OOOOO0O0 OOOOO000O00O000OOO0 



^O0000000000000000OOOOOO0OOO0OOOOOOOOOCXXX>OOCXXXXXXXXXX)OOOO€K>C 

Elizabethtown College 

The Homelike School 

Stands For 

HIGHER THINKING 

BETTER LIVING AND GREATER SERVICE 



High 

Ideals 

Excellent 

Christie* 

Atmosphere 

Ail Virtues 
At a Premium 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Nov. 13, 8 P. M. College Chapel 
FOUNDER'S DAY 

Nov. 19, 8 P. M. 

Town Market House Hall 

Dr. Herbert Cope's Great Lecture 



Strong 
Faculty 

Best 
Modern 
Methods 

Low 
Rates 



UPRIGHTNESS AND THOROUGHNESS REQUIRED 



OUR MOTTO 



»v 



EDUCATE FOR SERVICE" 

If you are looking for a life-work or calling, if you are eager to be of the 
greatest service possible, don't fail carefully to consider the opportunities for 
service in the teaching profession. The touch of the teacher is eternal. The 
teaching profession is calling loudly for worthy young men and women to 
enter this depleted and yet greatest of professions. Elizabethtown College 
offers courses that prepare teachers for the Public Schools, High Schools, 
Colleges, Commercial High Schools, Business Colleges, Mission Fields, Music 
Fields, Bible and Religious Education. 

A TEACHERS' COLLEGE UNDER CLOSE AND CAREFULL CHRISTIAN 

SUPERVISION. 



ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
00000000 °oooocxx>oooocxxxxxxxxxxxxx>^^ 




£UgAlETHTOWM,PA 



oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 



JwwwUWUWwUWUUWUWvWaaaaWWUUUUU 



HIVE 




' HIVE 



DEPARTMENT STORE 



OUR CREED 



We believe in the goods we are selling in our ability 
to get results. We believe that honest goods can be sold 
to honest people by honest methods. We believe in work- 
ing, not wasting; in laughing, not crying; in boosting, 
not knocking; and in the pleasure of doing business. We 
believe that a man gets what he goes after; that a cus- 
tomer today is worth two customers tomorrow; and that 
no man is down and out until he has lost faith in himself. 
We believe in courtesy, in kindness, in generosity, in good 
cheer, in friendship, and in honest competition. We be- 
lieve in increasing our business, and that the way to do 
it is to reach for it. 



WE ARE REACHING FOR YOURS 

A. A. ABELE 

ELIZABETHTOWN. 



OOCXXXKXXXXXXXXXX)OOOOOOOOOOOOOCK)000000000000000000000000000000 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



»OOOOOOOC)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCX>OOOOOOOOOOCXXXX}OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC)000( 

W. S. SMITH, President PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MaRTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

ELIZABETHTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL $100,000.00 

SURPLUS & PROFITS 144,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited Interest Paid On Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent 

DIRECTORS: 

W. S. Smith Elmer W. Strickler Peter N. Rutt 

F. W. Groff J. S. Risser B. L. Geyer 

E. C. Ginder Amos P. Coble E. E. Coble 

>oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo^ 

>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO; 

ELIZABETHTOWN EXCHANGE BANK 



Now Occupies Its New Bank Building 
Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 

Fays Interest on Time Deposits 

OFFICERS 

A. G. HEISEY, President ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier 
I. H. STAUFFER, Asst. Cashier C. A. COBLE, Teller 

DIRECTORS 

A. G. Heisey H E Landis B. H. Greider 

Allen A. Coble n ' B M. K. Forney 

H. J. Gish Ge0 ' D ' B ° ggS W. A. Withers 

Jos. G. Heisey E - E - Hernle y A. C. Fridy 

IqqqooqqooqqoqqqqqqoqqqqqoqqoqqqqoooqqqqoqqqqqqqqooqqqooooqqoI 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



sMifiKil 



Plain 
Clothing 



WATT & SHAND 



Centre Square LANCASTER, PA, 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SINCE THE DAYS OF THE GOLDSMITHS 

The goldsmiths of olden times, with whom banking had its be- 
ginning, undertook only to safeguard money and valuables en- 
trusted to their care. 

Banks have increased their activities since that time until they 
have become an indipensable factor in the finance and commerce 
of all civilized nations. 

The modern business man and woman who make full use of 
their bank looks upon it as an institution dealing in business in- 
telligence as well as money and credit. 

We invite business men and women to make use of all our fa- 
cilities for service. 

The Farmers' National Bank 

LITITZ, PENNA. 
S. W. Buch, President J. H. Breitigan, Cashier. 

>oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooc 



KEYSTONE NATIONAL BANK 

MANHEIM, PENNSYLVANIA 

CAPITAL $ 125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS 165,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 1,500,000 

FOUR PER CENT. INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS 
ACCOUNTS LARGE OR SMALL SOLICITED 

OFFICERS 
John B. Shenk, President 
H. M. Beamesderfer, Vice-President H. A. Merkey, Teller 

J. G. Graybill, Cashier Norman Weaver, Clerk 

Clair H. Keen, Asst. Cashier Anna Shollenberger, Clerk 

DIRECTORS 

H. M. Beamesderfer -. , * -. , R. O. Diehl 

Jacob t». Hershey 
John R. Cassel John B. Hossler 

Morris B. Ginder J * B> Shenk W. W. Moyer 



OUR TRUST DEPARTMENT CAN SERVE YOU AS 

Executor, Administrator, Assignee, Receiver, Guardian 
Agent, Attorney in Fact, Registrar 
OF STOCKS AND BONDS, ETC. 

>oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo^ 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



McLaughlin Bros. 
DRAYMEN 



LOCAL, LONG DISTANCE HAULING 

26 Washington Street 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
BELL PHONE 39-R2 

MARTIN 

READY-MADE AND MADE-TO-ORDER 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 

CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS AND SHOES 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



Trimmer's Great 
Bargain Emporium 

On the Square 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



Elizabethtown Roller Mills 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 
FLOUR, CORN MEAL AND FEED 



J. V. BINKLEY, Propr. 

402-404 South Market St. 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Pa. 



>oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooos 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MOUNT JOY, PA. 



Thomas J. Brown 
Jacob S. Carmany 
H. H. Myers 
Abraham L. Nissley 



directors: 

Gabriel Moyer 
Jos. B. Hostetter 
B. S. Stauffer 
Jno. W. Newcomer 
Amos N. Musser 



H. Roy Nissley 
Jacob N. Hershey 
E. S. Gerberich 
Henry H. Eby 



Capital $125,000.00 



Surplus & Profits $150,000.00 



officers: 

THOMAS J. BROWN, President J. S. CARMANY, Vice President 

R. FELLENBAUM, Cashier 

4% Paid on Savings Accounts and Time Certificates. Resources $1,600,000 
J00O0O00OOO0O<X)O0€>OOOOOO00OO(X)0O0OOCK>0OO0OOO0OOOOOOO0OO0O00O0^ 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SOUTH END GROCERY 

FRESH, FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES, CANDIES AND LUNCH GOODS 
"The little store with big business" 



Levi C. Hershey 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



A. W. CAIN 


LANCASTER SCHOOL SUPPLY CO. 


DRUGGIST 


L. B. Herr & Son 


Elizabethtown, Penna. 


Booksellers 


THE BETTER REPAIRING OF THE 


Stationeries 


BARNES SHOE SHOP 
WILL GRATIFY YOU 


Printers 


It's Real Economy 
43 South Market St ELIZABETHTOWN 


46-48 W. King St. LANCASTER, PA. 


NISSLEY'S LUNCH & DINING ROOMS 


THE GROSS 


David D. Clare, Proprietor 


CONFECTIONERY 


14-16 East Chestnut Street 


122 S. Market Street 


LANCASTER. PENNA, 


ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



BARD-BLANKENMYER CO., Inc 

plumbingTheating 

and SHEET METAL WORK 



118 South Queen Street, 



LANCASTER, PA. 



GUNSMITH 



LOCKSMITH 



DOMNITZ BROS. 

If it's a (LOCK) key, we have it 
222 }£ N. Q. St. LANCASTER, PA. 



A, C. NcLANACHAN 
BARBER 

21 E. High St 

Second Door From Post Office 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



BUCH MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



WE BUILD THE FOLLOWING GOODS IN 

THE COLLEGE TOWN 



Wheelbarrows, Corn Shelters, Wood Saws, 
Land Rollers, Pulverizers, Water Troughs 



HENRY L. GISE 



Notary Public, Surveyor and Conveyancer 

Insurance of all Kinds 

Agent for 

State Capital Savings and Loan 

Association 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



J. W. G. Hershey, Pres. 

J. Bitzer Johns, V. Pres. 

Henry R. Gibbel, Sec. & Treas. 



The Lititz Agricultural 

Mutual Fire 

Insurance Company 



Insures against Lightning, Storm and Fir* 

Insurance in force $39,000,000 
Issues both Cash and Assessment Policies 



13 EAST MAIN STREET 
LITITZ, PENNA. 



PHONOGRAPHS 

We handle only one make and that is the 

EDISON £7. Y a! 

FISHER'S 

8 Centre Square 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



EBY SHOE COMPANY 

Incorporated 
Manufacturers of 

MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S 

FINE WELT AND TURNED 

SHOES 



LITITZ, 



PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



>CXXXXX>OOOOOOOOOCX)OOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXXX)OOOOOOOOOCXKXXX>0000000000^ 

HEATING and PLUMBING 



Miller Pipeless Furnaces 

and 
Leader Water Systems 



Leo KOB 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

>QQQQQQOQQQQQQQQQQOQQOQQQQQOQQQQQQOQOQQQQQQ<yXX3QQQQQOQQOOQOQQl 



J.W. ZMRFOSS 

GENERAL HARDWARE 
Sporting & Housefurnishing Goods 



ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

POTTS DEPARTMENT STORE 
"EPHRATA'S BIGGEST BEST STORE" 

SHOES— Built for 
Comfort and Style 



EBERLY BROTHERS 

Ephrata, Pa. 



CHAS. K. MUSSER 



Electrical 
Contractor 

All Kinds of 

Electrical Supplies and Fixtures 

HOUSE WIRING A SPECIALTY 

The Ephrata Review 

$1.50 A YEAR 

Best Job Printing 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



Chas. S. Yeager, Propr. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



THE WILLEY COMPANY INC. 

Superior Laundry Machinery 



FACTORY COLUMBIA, PENNA. 



OFFICE PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



109 East King Street 




Lancaster, Penna. 



JACOB FISHER 

8 Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
WATCHMAKER & JEWELER 
With you for 40 years that's all 
From 10 to 20 per cent, lower than the 
lowest for the same grade of make. 




Seller's Kitchen Cabinet, the best ser- 
vant in your house. I have just received 
a half car load of above cabinets, which I 
will sell at Special reductions during Octo- 
ber and November. Call and see the Cabi- 
net, and get prices. 



H. S. HOTTENSTEIN, 
R. D. 2 ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



HERSHEY TRUST CO. 

HERSHEY, PENNA. 
Capital, Surplus and Profits $425,000.00 
Resources $3,500,000.00 
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 
M. S. Hershey, President 
W. H. Lebhicker, V. Pres. 
Ezra F. Hershey, V. Pres. 
S. C. Stechon, Treas. 
John A. Landis U. G. Risser, M.D. 

J. B. Leithiser John E. Snyder 

Wm. F. R. Murrie A. W. Stauffer 

Commercial Banking Department 
Saving Department Trust Department 

LARGEST CIRCULATION AND 
ADVERTISING PATRONAGE 

Elizabethtown Chronicle 

Fifty-one Years Old and Still Young 



Garrett, Miller & Co. 



Electrical 
Supplies 



N. E. Cor. Fourth & Orange St». 
WILMINGTON, -:- -:- DELAWARE 



"Aint" It Queer 

A Horace who isn't a Roman. 

A Hannah who isn't aged. 

A Harshman who isn't harsh, ask Mary. 

A Maria who isn't a Pickleweight 

An Oliver who isn't a typewriter. 

A Daniel who never was in a lion's den. 

A Weaver who doesn't weave. 

A Doctor who doesn't practice. 

A Mohr who always has enough. 

A girl who always is where Land-is. 

An Ammon not good to eat. 

A Hart that isn't conical. 

An Icy who isn't treacherous. 

A Trimmer who doesn't trim H. E. R. hair. 

A Bonebrake who never breaks nerr bones 

A Paul who doesn't preach. 

A Good who is sometimes bad. 

A Thomas who isn't a boy. 

A Henning who isn't a pigeon. 

A Jesse who isn't the father of David. 

A Florence not in Italy. 

A John who is not a disciple. 

A Withers who never withers. 

A Ruby who isn't a stone. 

A Hackman who never drives a hack. 

An Oliver who isn't a Cromwell. 

A Barr that's not of Chocolate. 

A Walker who sometimes runs. 

A Nies who doesn't have an uncle Hen. 

An Amos who isn't a prophet. 

A Miller who doesn't mill. 

An Esther who isn't a queen, (as yet). 

A Hykes who doesn't like hikes. 

A Bright-bill that you can't spend 

A Bair that doesn't growl. 

A Tiny who isn't so small. 

S. H. O.— E. Z. 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Literary 



How to Study 

Symposium — Chapel 

Know author of your book. 

Get viewpoint of author in pre- 
face, visualize, translate thought 
into your own language. 

Get social viewpoint by thinking 
in terms of real experience, and as- 
sociation to real life. 

Develop sense of sympathy and 
appreciation. 

Form mind picture by use of pic- 
tures and maps. 

Keep note books for general 
thoughts. 

Score main thoughts and points. 

Use dictionary. 

Concentrate ! ! ! H. H. Nye. 

"Many are exposed to an educa- 
tion but few take it." 

Be constitutionally fit. 

Education is contagious. 

Use nature as a Text Book, es- 
pecially in science 

Study and note points in the les- 
son not for recitation but to verify 
nature's text. 

Confirm and fix lesson in mind. 
L. W. Leiter. 

Know what you are to get; be 
sure of assignment. 

Exercise will power. 

Consider the effect of water on a 
goose's back. Be not a goose. 

Concentrate ! ! ! 

Miss Elizabeth Myer. 

Distinguish between real and 
nominal study. Understand and 
practice what has been studied. 

Train mind to observe, be ac- 
curate in observation. 



Make use of principle of recall. 

Emphasize reference and re- 
search work. 

Change attitude of Sense of Study 
— Obligation to Sense of Study — 
Opportunity. I. S. Hoffer. 

Study ! ! 

S. — Scheduled time. 

T. — Tell visitors you are busy when 
they come to interrupt. 

U. — Upside down room not condu- 
cive to study. Have room in 
order. 

D. — "Dig like a dull Dutchman 
desperately determined to de- 
velop a Doctor of Divinity. 

Y. — Yearning. 

You can lead a mule to water 
but you can't make him drink, 
"Y" can't you make him 
drink? J. S. Harley. 

Study Shingles 

Open day and night. 

Never closed. 

Me wakey all the time. 

Teacher — To arouse and guide 
self activity in student. 

Student — Use self activity to get 
knowledge. 



Student — Child 

Consciousness — What 



is 



1. 

That? 

2. Desire to perceive and un- 
derstand interior — What's in it? 

3. Origin — Who made it? 

4. Use and application — What 
do you do with it? 

Student — Get word of lesson; 
what does it mean ; grasp in your 
own language; what is the evi- 
dence; Application — J. Z. Herr. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



The Force of Character 

Character is what a man is. Repu- 
tation is what others think he is. 
One may possess beauty of physique 
or abundant social elegance and yet 
lack the power of becoming pro- 
foundly occupied in the deeper or 
spiritual affairs of life. Character 
has depths that cannot" be fathomed. 
Character is durable and grows 
with life and friendship. 

How have the truly great patriots 
of yesterday and today attained 
their enviable rank among men. By 
noble birth? No, for many were of 
lowly birth. By inheritance of 
wealth? No, for many were nearly 
crushed to death by the iron-clad 
hands of poverty-stricken homes. 
By opportunities? No, for the ones 
that did attain their rank thus were 
the ones who made them realistic 
by unyielding energy and untiring 
efforts. No, our truly great men who 
are looked up to and admired are 
the men who acquired their worthy 
positions by the force of character. 

There are various ways that one 
life may influence another, but 
character is one of the greatest 
channels thru which influence di- 
rects it's forces. Characters of many 
types exist today, but can be classed 
into the following classes, immoral, 
moral and Christian. 

Place a degraded or immoral 
character in a community and his 
deadly influence will be felt every- 
where. His venomous fangs sting 
many an innocent one and lead him, 
poisoned to the same degraded 
plane of immoral thought life and 
conduct. A contaminated character 
is a detriment to society. A man 
with an enlightened mind who 



subordinates morals is a menace to 
any community. Place a moral 
character in a community and his 
ideals and motives become a sweet 
compelling fragrance conducive to 
true and honest living. A moral 
character does much towards civic 
enlightenment and improvement 
but he too often lacks the power of 
deep spiritual concentration. Again 
place a Christian character, the 
beacon light of character, in a com- 
munity and his magnetic influence 
cannot be fathomed. The ambitious 
and ideals of Christian characters 
are to fashion their lives after that 
Supreme Character, the Father of 
man. Were this the only aim, he 
would be extremely selfish. But his 
highest ideal is to work out His di- 
vine will in bringing His kingdom to 
the hearts of men. A Christian 
character then, I say, is an almost 
invisible something whose power is 
mightier than the sword and whose 
force transforms the world. 

It is true that the scientist can 
weigh the earth and her sister 
planets. It is true that the electri- 
cian can flash his voice to the re- 
motest parts of the earth in the 
twinkle of an eye. It is true that 
the literary genius can arouse the 
world with his productions. It is 
true that the painted canvas of the 
artist can scarcely be distinguished 
from that of nature. But to me, 
these, marvellous as they be, are not 
the greatest achievements in life. 
Let us so fashion our lives that our 
character may shed a wielding in- 
fluence such that will provoke a de- 
sire for higher ideals, nobler 
thoughts and purer motives within 
the lives of those who follow us. 



Volume XVII Number 2 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



Editor-in-Chief Jacob S. Harley 

Associate Editor Florence T. Moyer 

Departmental Editor H. H. Nye 

Alumni Editor L. W. Leiter 

Religious News Editor Ezra M. Wenger 

( Emma Ziegler 

School News 

( Stanley Ober 

Business Manager J. Z. Herr 

Circulation Manager E.G. Meyer 



Our College Times is published monthly during the Academic year of Elizabeth- 
town College. 

This paper will have to be discontinued as soon as the time of subscription expires 
as an action of the United States legislature. 

Please renew in time and report any change of address to the business manager. 

Subscription rates one dollar per year; fifteen cents per copy; six subscriptions 
$5.00 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



Editorials 



October "The Good of Others" 

She dyes the maples in a dye 

Of rainbow pigments made, "Do your best and rejoice with 

And hangs them on the hills to dry, him who can do better "Thank God 

Before the colors fade ; f or every wave of uplifting that 

And day by day the marvel grows takeg ft feUow mortal tQ & r 

Till all the landscape burns and , ,. 

i level, though you may not yourself 

Ira E. Sherman be b° rn e aloft on the billow. 

O, suns and skies and flowers of "There is an infinite satisfaction in 

June, receiving the gifts of God, but the 

Count all your boasts together; . ., , , . ,, 

/ . . • . , & privilege of becoming the means 

Ye cannot rival for one hour, . 

October's bright blue weather! through which he will bestow light 

I will study and get ready and and blessings upon others, is the 

maybe my chance will come. greatest privilege bestowed upon 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



man." There is no beautifier of the 
complexion or form, or behavior, 
like the wish to scatter joy and not 
pain around us — Emerson. The 
wealth of a man is the number of 
things he loves and blesses, and by 
which he is loved and blessed — 
Carlyle. He who makes goodness 
attractive and shows that wicked- 
ness, no matter how promising, is 
always misery and ruin is doing the 
greatest good to his fellow-men. 

Sel. 

Things to Forget 

If you see a tall fellow ahead of 

a crowd, 
A leader of men, marching fear- 
less and proud, 
And you know of a tale whose mere 
telling aloud 
Would cause his proud head to in 
anguish be bowed, 
It's a pretty good plan to forget it. 

If you know of a skeleton hidden 
away 
In a closet, and guarded, and 
kept from the day. 
In the dark, and whose showing, 
whose sudden display 
Would cause grief and sorrow 
and life, long dismay, 
It's a pretty good plan to forget it. 

If you know of a thing that will 
darken the joy 
If a man or a woman, a girl of a 
boy, 
That will wipe out a smile, or the 
least way annoy 
A fellow, or cause any gladness 
to cloy, 
It's a pretty good plan to forget it. 
Today's Magazine. 



Living in Him 



The story is told of an aged 
colored man, who in the course of 
his conversation about the weather 
and his health, said: "Fse always 
notice dat if I live through the 
month o' March, Fse live all de rest 
ob de yeah." According to the life 
and spirit of the Volunteers after 
the summer month, we will have a 
warm, busy and active Band 
throughout the year. 

It is our aim that each Volunteer 
shall be a spiritual center radiating 
the Master's purpose wherever we 
may be. By our weekly consecra- 
tion meetings, it is evident that we 
are not afraid of the cost of high 
living, for the cost of living on a 
high plane is worth all the love, 
consecration, determination and un- 
wavering trust in God that it re- 
quires. After all, there is no cost 
connected with the consecrated life 
for our efforts are invisible when we 
get a vision of our reward; the joy 
of service, the companionship of 
Jesus and the love of a Heavenly 
Father. Only self is expensive, so 
we aim to drive self out by letting 
the Christ Life flow in. Then only 
can we be so busy thinking right 
thoughts, speaking kind words, see- 
ing bright things, so busy climbing 
up hill that we won't have time to 
push another down. 

Jesus was the ideal Missionary 
Volunteer and we have openly de- 
clared ths + we have invited Him to 
live his beautiful life of purity, 
of self-denial, of unselfish service 
for others, over again in us. 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Religious Notes 



"Bend Thou my will to Thine" 

This is the prayer of a soul who 
had caught sight of a vision of the 
overcoming life with Jesus, and yet 
this person finds that he or she has 
a very hard time to place himself 
or herself at the disposal of God's 
own will so He can use him or her 
and they might enjoy great bless- 
ings. 

Surrendering our wills to God's 
will is not so very difficult when we 
think of the blessings only but when 
we think of the pleasures we must, 
at times forego ; of the sacrifices we 
must almost continually make; of 
the privileges we cannot always en- 
joy, etc. Then is the time our wills 
will not bend to His. Perhaps we 
want to develop our social natures; 
our appreciation for the artistic, the 
beautiful and the wonderful. We 
want to live in fine houses, revel in 
the luxuries of riches, honor and 
reputation. These are some things 
that keep us from bending our wills 
to God's will. It may be that all 
these longings we have must be 
bent in favor of God's will. And yet 
if we only knew how God uses those 
very longings and tendencies in our 
lives to bring happiness, joy, peace 
and good will to others if we but 
bend our wills to God's will and 
respond when He calls us. 

Bending our wills to God's will is 
not "signing away" our freedom. 
We then become free indeed for as 
long as we have things which are 
simply transient which keep us 
from enjoying the best, the highest 



the eternal then surely we are 
slaves indeed to our own superficial 
tendencies. 

Surely all of us with common in- 
telligence want the highest and 
best. Yet we all find ourselves un- 
able in our own strength, to let go 
of these things and let God use us 
as He knows best. 

Then we must pray the prayer of 
the one who prayed 

"Bend Thou My Will To Thine" 



Have Thine Own way, Lord ! 

Have Thine Own way! 

Thou art the Potter; I am the Clay. 

Mould me and make me 

After Thy will, 

While I am waiting, 

Yielded and still. 

Have Thine Own way Lord! 

Have Thine Own way! 

Hold o'er my being absolute sway! 

Fill with Thy Spirit 

Till all shall see 

Christ only, always, 

Living in me ! 



A Prayer 



Now I get me up to work, 
I pray the Lord I may not shirk; 
If I should die before the night, 
I pray the Lord my work's do.ne 
right. 

Amora Fitch. 



The Days 

John Oxenham 

The Days steal softly through the curtained Door, 
One at a time the warder lets — no more, 
Each with his gifts close-vailed from human sight, 
And lays them at my feet upon the floor; 
Then waits while I discover what he brought, 
Great things and small, with good and evil fraught, 
And watches quietly while I make play, 
For good or ill, and all too oft for naught. 

And while he waits I deck him as I will. 
And whiles it is well done, and whiles but ill; 
Naught any wears but what my will has wrought, 
And what I do is all unchangeable. 

Each bears a scroll and quick inscribes thereon 
All that I do, the more I leave undone; 
Till, when night beckons from his door, they pass, 
And leave me for a little space alone. 

But each, ere passing through night's shadowy door, 
Strips off his robes and leaves them on the floor; 
Each Day goes naked, bearing but his scroll, 
And what he leaves is added to my store. 

He passes through the Portal of the Night, 

But that he leaves lies ever in our sight — 

God's sight and mine — and some is gray, some black, 

And some, by God's sweet Grace, is almost white. 

So speeds the great procession of the Days 
Too fast, too slow, but naught its progress stays ;' 
Each gives me back that which I first have given, 
But what each takes my endless future sways. 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Campaign Notes 



Endowment Campaign Notes 

Well, the campaign is coming to 
a close and the solicitors will soon 
have to look for something else to 
do. Seven congregations more and 
the gigantic task of raising $400,- 
000 will be over. The Lord favored 
the solicitors with good weather, 
good health, and a reliable red 
Ford. 

Since last July fifteen congrega- 
tions were solicited, nine of which 
went beyond their quotas. These 
congregations were : Pleasant Hill, 
123 per cent; Lower Cumberland, 
114 per cent; Lower Conewago, 101 
per cent; Reading, 149 per cent; 
Fredericksburg, 104 per cent; Mid- 
way, 105 per cent; Lake Ridge, N. 
Y., 130 per cent; Conestoga, 102 
per cent; Mountville, 123 per cent. 

Elder Joseph Burkhart piloted 
the solicitors through the rural end 
of the Ridge Congregation and 
Elder H. D. Emmert directed us 
through the town of Shippensburg. 
There is a healthy sentiment for 
Elizabethtown College in this con- 
gregation. A number of successful 
teachers from this church have re- 
ceived their training at our school. 

The next congregation solicited 
was Pleasant Hill. It was indeed a 
pleasant place to work. Even 
thought it was hay-making time 
several loyal brethren drop- 
ped their work on the fields and 
accompanied us to every home in 
the congregation. This church went 
over her quota. There are a num- 
ber of prospective students in this 



congregation for Elizabethtown 
College. 

The Lower Cumberland Congre- 
gation was solicited during harvest. 
Bro. J. W. Galley assisted nobly in 
getting us around from home to 
home. This church had a quota of 
nearly nine thousand dollars and 
raised over ten thousand dollars. 
Bro. Jesse Asper, one of our fre- 
quent visitors at the college, also 
proved himself a loyal supporter of 
the school in accompanying the 
solicitors several days. A number 
of our graduates came from this 
congregation. 

In the Lower Conewago Congre- 
gation Elder E. M. Wenger assisted 
in the work of soliciing. Elder 
Oliver Cook piloted Elder Wenger 
in the Dillsburg end of the congre- 
gation. Elders A. M. Brodbeck, G. 
W. Harlacher, and Charles Altland 
directed us in the other end of the 
congregation. The success of our 
work in this church was due in part 
to the splendid record made by a 
number of former students who are 
now teaching school. 

With this congregation the cam- 
paign ended in Southern Pennsyl- 
vania. There are twenty-one con- 
gregations in the district. Of these 
churches ten went beyond their 
quotas so far as to put the entire 
district over the top. The total 
quota for the entire district was 
$164,084, and the total amount 
raised was $177,144. This places 
the Southern District of Pennsyl- 
vania over the top by more than 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



thirteen thousand dollars. May the 
Lord be praised for this noble sacri- 
fice made in behalf of the cause of 
Christian education. 

The Eastern District of Pennsyl- 
vania has not responded quite so 
well as Southern Pennsylvania but 
is about up to her quota thus far. 
We hope and trust she may also do 
her part in this noble work. 

During the summer months we 
were "busy in the following congre- 
gations making a call to every home 
of our members: Reading, Fred- 
ericksburg, Big Swatara, Little 
Swatara, Midway, Lake Ridge, N. 
Y., Springville, Akron, West Con- 
estoga, Conestoga and Mountville. 
Were it not for the assistance and 
co-operation of the elders of these 
congregations and of deacons and 
lay members our work would have 
been a failure. Eternity alone will 
reveal some of the blessings and 
rewards for the genuine sacrifices 
made in money and in time by these 
brethren devoted to the cause of 
the Master. 

If the remaining seven congrega- 
tions do their part in this work we 
will reach our goal. We expect to 
have the work finished by the end 
of this year. 

The solicitors will attend the 
District Meeting of Southern Penn- 
sylvania on October 27 and then 
solicit the Mechanic Grove Church 
the latter part of the week. 



The program of religion parallels 
the program of education. 



We must crown Him Lord of all 
or we crown Him not at all. 



By the grace of God we are what 
we are. " 



If you cannot save the world by 
love you cannot save it at all. 



He who cannot smile ought not to 
keep a shop. — Chinese Proverb. 



One bad habit will break down a 
man's character enough to admit 
another. 



Making the unfit fit may mean 
beginning with the person that 
bears your name. 



There are no prizes for those 
afraid to dream ; nor for those who 
lack energy to wake from their 
dreams and work. 



"Cheer up" 
When the sun of joy is hidden, 

And the sky is overcast, 
Just remember light is coming, 

And a storm can never last. 



"Deep" 

"A — Is Zendt a deep thinker?" 
B — Judging by his ideas, they 
never get to the surface. 



Honesty is the best policy; but a 
man who is honest only through 
policy cannot be depended on to 
resist very much temptation. 



"Was That Somebody you?" 
"Look at that chap gobble his 
soup" "Economy, my boy! He's 
hurrying so as not to lose any of 
it through evaporation." 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Personals 



Miss Myer in Public Speaking, 
"Charity does not besave herself." 



Special interest is being taken in 
''Horace" this year especially by 
Miss E. T. 



Beth in library when Mr. Rine- 
hart's chair partially collapsed, 
"Oh ! ! his leg came out. 



Prof. Meyer, while stressing 
economy, "Do not fill the bath- 
room with water when taking a 
bath." 



Miss Kreider in School manage- 
ment "The teacher should live up 
to her responsibility and — things 
like that." 



Miss Grosh on the bulletin board 
"The Tripod Miscopes (Micro- 
scopes) are at the book-room." 



Miss B. (to Mr. A. Rinehart, who 
came late to supper) "You should 
not come after grace." 

Mr. R., "What Grace?" 



When the seniors were selecting 
their class pins, Miss Neis re- 
marked, "Now if you vote to have 
the long one, it will be shorter." 



Miss Eberly takes all cartoons 
literally especially those about 
goats, for upon seeing one she asked 
very seriously, "Is it true that goats 
eat tin cans?" 



Miss Gruber, "Aren't you coming 
to Missions?" 

Miss Bair, "No, I'm in the 'Bet- 
ter World'." 



Miss M. in French class: "Miss 
Reber, read and translate the next 
sentence. 

Miss Reber: Etes-nous Gaston 
Faulquier? Quickly she said "Now." 



Biography of Peg. Written by 
herself. When Peg was but a little 
girl how well I recollect, how she 
wore short red curls and freckles 
on her neck. 



Miss B. is very much puzzled as 
to a certain point in grammar. Will 
somebody please relieve her mind 
by telling her which is proper, to 
say "Is it she?" or "Is it 'Herr'?" 



A Play— "Nightly." 
Setting — Library. 

Act I 

7:15 — E. T. remembers research 
work in Library. 

7:20 — H. E. R. remembers simi- 
lar work. 

Act II 
7 :25— E. T. finds work in further 
corner of Library. 

7:25— H. E. R. Ditto. 

Act III 
They both study hard the re- 
mainder of the evening? ? ? ? ? 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



Departmental Notes 



The Bible in a College Curriculum 

President Henry Churchill King 
says, "I feel increasingly that the 
two considerations that must move 
us in coming to the reality, first of 
Religion, and then thru religion into 
reality in our theological thinking 
are first, we must put ourselves per- 
sistently in the presence of the 
Great Spiritual world in voluntary 
surrounder to it; especially remem- 
bering how inextricably the reality 
of the Spiritual world is bound up 
in persistent loyalty to the ethical 
demand; second, we must follow 
the laws of the spiritual life. This 
means that we must persistently ful- 
fil the conditions of a deepening 
personal relation with God, only 
being sure that we do not transfer 
to God our limitations of the finite." 

President King being a broad- 
minded man one would naturally 
expect such a statement from him 
but the time is fast coming that we 
need not go only to men of King's 
caliber, but many more people are 
beginning to see that The Book is 
the greatest source of inspiration. 
Men are no longer scoffing at it as a 
book to be used only by the weak- 
lings and children but strong men 
and strong women and people from 
the rank and file of the crowded 
districts of cities; of the "upper 
classes," and of the comfortably 
situated country folk are all alike 
coming to the Bible to receive light 
and life. There is a reason for. this, 
men have tried almost any means 
both institutional and private to 
solve their problems and to aid 



economic conditions but they are 
beginning to see that they need to 
come bact to The Simple Book 
where they should have started. 
The Bible is the best source from 
which one can get satisfying and 
lasting solutions to the several prob- 
lems which arise in the Political 
Circle; the Economic World and the 
domestic relationships. 

Since all the future responsibility 
for the maintenance of peace, for 
the organizing of a satisfactory so- 
cial system, for the upbuilding and 
the perpetuation of all Christian 
activities and institutions which 
bring us into the presence of the 
Spiritual World rest upon the young 
people of today, then it becomes 
our duty and privilege to give them 
such training and ideals which will 
not only bring them in the presence 
of the great Spiritual Worid but 
will cause them to surrender 
voluntarily to it so that the world 
may be a more desirable place in 
which to live and to live in such 
a way that men and women will 
flock to the Great God Who has 
given us the Bible. 

Consequently a department, 
which teaches and prepares men 
and women for the high art of 
Christian living, because they are 
taken to the very fountain head of 
life and inspiration, is indespensible 
and no college can afford to exist, 
yea no college should be allowed 
to exist without it. Many of the 
troubles of international, national 
and local nature are the outgrowth 
of the fact that men and women 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



have gone thru colleges without 
coming in contact with God and His 
attributes. 

It would not be wise to teach the 
Bible only, for while it does touch 
every phase of life, it is no com- 
plete source of information or of 
complete methods of proceedure in 
the several activities which are 
found in a complex social order. 
However none of the reputed 
courses of any college Curriculum 
should conflict with the Bible 
neither should the Bible conflict 
with any other course which is 
based on Truth. It is not true that 
a student cannot study, with good 
propriety, the Bible and science. 
The Bible or History, The Bible and 
art or the Bible with any other 
standard and truthful course. If 
they conflict then either The Bible 
is not understood or else the Course 
in question is of a spurious nature. 

The true relation between the 
Bible and other courses as named 
above should be that they comple- 
ment each other. However one can- 
not help but recognize that the 
Bible is in the center and the other 
courses are the spokes as it were 
going out each of whose size is in 
proportion to the importance at- 
tached to it as it relates itself to 
humanity in serving it. 



Living constantly in the presence 
of the best brings personality to its 
full measure of strength and power. 



Gleanings 

From Harrisburg S. S. Convention 

For He Must Reign! 

The man who is educated in mind 
but not in moral is a menace to So- 
ciety. 



A religious education should be 
the heritage of every child. 



Our task is to make America 
Christian for the higher service of 
the world. 

The best definition of religion is 
the life of the teacher for religion 
is life. 

What today we build into 
thought and action tomorrow be- 
comes character and personality. 



Marriages 

(Continued from Alumni Page) 

Joshua D. Reber, '15 and Ina 
Crosswhite. Mr. Reber is an ac- 
countant in Cleveland, Ohio. 

J. Oram Leiter, '16 and Ruth Na- 
omi Oiler. They are living at 
Smithsburg, Md., on the fruit farm 
of Mr. Leiter's father. 

Lester N. Myer, '16 and Ruth 
Kilhefner, '17. They are living in 
Ephrata, Pa., while Mr. Myer is 
teaching in the Brownsville High 
School. 

Miss Inez Byers, '17 and Roger 
Winger, graduate of North Man- 
chester, Bethany and Univesity of 
Chicago. Mr. and Mrs. Winger 
will reside in LaVerne, California, 
where Prof. Winger will teach in 
LaVerne College and act as Re- 
ligious Educational Director. 

Elmer R. Ruhl, '08 and Florence 
Evans, graduate of Juniata College 
and a successful teacher. Mr. and 
Mrs. Ruhl reside inwhere Prof. 
Ruhl is engaged in teaching. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



College Hill Chronicle 



A Teachers Reward 

"We have just learned of a 
teacher who started poor twenty 
years ago and has retired with the 
comfortable fortune of fifty thou- 
sand dollars. This was acquired 
.through industry, economy, con- 
scientious effort, indomitable perse- 
verance and the death of an uncle 
who left her an estate valued at 
$49,999.50. 

Seneca Vocational School. 

Visitors 

College Hill has recently wel- 
comed the following visitors: Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank Miller, Mr. and 
Mrs. J. Brown Oellig and daughter 
Cora, Mr. and Mrs. Harshman, Mr. 
and Mrs. G. K. Henning and family, 
Mr. and Mrs. P. E. Zendt and 
daughter Elizabeth, Mrs. S. C. 
Moyer, Misses Florence Shenk T 
Ethel Wenger, Laura Frantz, 
Messrs. Samuel King, Carlos Wiest, 
Victor Wiest, Warren Brubaker, 
Nathan Heisey. 

Orange Blossoms 

Schlosser-Souders — On August 
i"th at the home of the bride in 
Akron, Pa., Mr. R. W. Schlosser 
and Miss Elizabeth D. Souders were 
married in the presence of the im- 
mediate families. They were at- 
tended by Miss Ella G. Young, of 
East Petersburg as bridesmaid, and 
Mr. W. E. Glasmire as groomsman. 
The ushers were Mr. J. G. Myer of 
Fredricksburg, Pa., and Miss Anna 
Royer of Denver, Pa., Mr. and Mrs. 
Schlosser now reside on Park street, 
Elizabethtown, and will be pleased 



to have friends call. 

College Times, Oct. 19/39 

Surprise 

Lay books away, 
And wend your way 

To the kitchen to a treat, 

Given by the cook so sweet. 

Thursday 

9:40 to 10:00 p. m. 

Oct. 20, 1920 

Encouraging 

It is with pleasure that we see 
Prof. L. W. Leiter take possession 
of his new home on College Avenue. 
He moved into it October 18. The 
new buildings are showing signs of 
progress toward completion. We 
hope ere long to be able to occupy 
these new buildings. 

October 14 

On the evening of October 14 in 
Market House Hall, Margaret Stahl 
read Abraham Lincoln and thus in- 
troduced the College Lecture 
Course of 1920-1921. The Hall was 
well filled and the interest keen and 
we feel sure that no one was dis- 
appointed in the excellent rendi- 
tion of that Reading. 

Excelsior 

October 20th marked a Red-let- 
ter Day in the life of the Literary 
Societies of E. C. The Organization 
was effected of three new Societies, 
including the re-organization of the 
Homerian Society for all students of 
College standing. This society num- 
bers forty members and the interest 
is splendid. The Keystone Society 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



is proving its motto "Excelsior" by Franklin-Keystone and Penn-Key- 



giving rise to two new Junior So- 
cieties of equal rank. Each of these 
Societies numbers thirty-six mem- 
bers, and they bear the names 



stone respectively. With the co- 
operation of every student we an- 
ticipate great things from these 
Societies. 



Alumni Notes 



Fellow Alumni, it does one good 
to see the substantial interest mani- 
fested toward our Alma Mater as 
we see the Alumni portion of the 
Endowment Campaign grow with 
the steady enlargement of our 
share. Is it not indeed a splendid 
privilege we have accorded to us 
as Alumni of the early years of our 
Alma Mater thus to assist in bring- 
ing forward the standard of Eliza- 
bethtown College to a place where 
her efficient work will receive the 
recognition justly due her? This is 
an opportunity of the few. We may 
justly be proud of the fact that to 
us has come such an opportunity. 
This is our opportunity of rendering 
our gratitude to our Alma Mater 
who has contributed so largely to 
our well-being thus to brighten our 
lives and to enlarge our sphere of 
services to our fellow-man. May 
Elizabethtown College by the as- 
sistance of her Alumni and the 
blessing of God enlarge the borders 
of her service even cherishing the 
motto "Educate for Service." Long 
Live our Alma Mater. 

It is with pleasure that we learn 
of the noteworthy success of Mr. 
and Mrs. B. F. Waltz, '10 in their 
pastoral service to the Second 
Church of the Brethren in Altoona. 



Pa. Elder Waltz formerly was pas- 
tor in Elk Lick, Pa., where he left 
behind him an excellent record in 
pastoral service. 

Virgil C. Holsinger, '15 and fam- 
ily have moved to 618 10th Street, 
Bellwood, Pa., where he is now en- 
gaged in Pastoral work and teach- 
ing in the Public schools , of this 
place. Rev. Holsinger by this move 
has closed a very successful service 
as Principal of the High School at 
Bird-in-Hand, Pa. 

E. G. Diehm, 10, has accepted a 
position as Professor of Expression 
in the High School of Bellefountain, 
Ohio. Prof. Diehm was formerly 
pastor of the Royersford church. 

Kathryn Leiter, '18 is engaged in 
teaching in the Public Schools of 
Greencastle, Pa. She is doing fourth 
grade work which is proving to be 
very interesting to her. 

G. A. A. Stauffer, '09 is receiv- 
ing teller in the National Bank of 
Chambersburg, Pa., the finest 
equipped and most up-to-date bank 
in Franklin County, Pa. 

Rebecca Sheaffer, '13 is engaging 
in Teaching English in Camp Dix, 
N. J. Her reports indicate that she 
is enjoying her work and meeting 
with many valuable experiences. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



Jos. O. Cashman, '05 recently 
paid a visit to his Alma Mater. Mr. 
Cashman is engaged in the Hard- 
ware business, as a member of the 
firm Beck and Benedict Hardware 



Co., Waynesboro, Pa. 

These are the activities of some 
of our Alumni. 

What are you doing? Others en- 
joy knowing. 



Calendar 



Calendar for the Month 

Oct. 4 The earth turned on its 
axis from west to east. 

Oct. 5 First game of soccer of 
the season. 

Oct. 6 Faculty met for three 
hours straight, more or less; mostly 
less. 

Oct. 7 Girls hike for fringed 
gentians. 

Oct. 8 Fifth week of school. 
Children went home. 

Oct. 9 'The frost is on the pump- 
kin and the fodder's in the shock." 

Oct. 10 Visitors galore. 

Oct. 11 "Much ado about noth- 
ing." 

Oct. 12 Dates, but not the kind 
you eat. 

Oct. 13 The arrival of Anna 
Charlotte Meyer. 

Oct. 14 The reading of "Abra- 
ham Lincoln" by Miss Margaret 
Stahl. Moreover the birthdays of 
Mr. Paul Zug and Miss Ina Lisky. 

Oct. 15 Ice-cream for supper! 

Oct. 16 A moonlight walk minus 
the moonlight. 

Oct. 17 Preaching at Newville 
social privileges. 

Oct. 18 Dr. P. P. Klaxton lectures 
in Lebanon. Some students and 
teachers attend. 

Oct. 19 Paul played a great game 
of short (slightly indisposed). Miss 



G. Royer goes home to a wedding. 

Oct. 20 The passing of the K. L. 
S. 

Oct. 21 Cleaning day — Apple 
Butter boiling. 

Oct. 22 Blankety blank. 

Oct. 23 L. W. Leiter, Jr., joins 
the ranks. 

Oct. 24 A great Sunday School- 
meeting in town. 

Oct. 25 Blue Monday. 

Oct. 26 Sixty-sixth anniversary 
of the battle of Balakalava. Para- 
dise still Lost. 

Oct. 27 Miss Hershey piloted a 
live prayer meeting. 

Oct. 28 Gone, but not forgotten. 

Oct. 29 Fresh pies. 

Oct. 30 "The Goblin's '11 Git ye 
ef ye don't watch out." 

Oct. 31 Farewell October; fare- 
well to thee. 

E. Z.— S. O. 



GEORGE S, DAUGHERTY GO. 

N. York -Chicago-Pittsburg 



Quality No. 10 fruits and vege- 
tables in No. 10 tins. 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Darby Brand Canned Foods Are Quality 
Packed. Packed Exclusively For 

Comly, Flanigen & Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 

118 & 120 So., Delaware Ave., Phila. 

Ask Your Dealer For Darby Brand 
A Trial will convince 



A. B. DRACE 
PAINTER 

AND 

PAPER HANGER 

S. Market St. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



;OLLEGE JEWELRY OF THE BETTER 
SORT 

J. F. APPLE CO. 

MANUFACTURING 
JEWELER 

CLASS PINS & JEWELRY PRIZE CUPS, 

FRATERNITY JEWELRY MEDALS 

120 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 

DR. S. J. HEINDEL & SON 

DENTIST 

Out-of-Town Friday each week 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

HEADQUARTERS FOR MAGAZINES 

Subscriptions and Counter Sales 

Best Display in County 

THE ROOT MAGAZINE AGENCY 

121 W. High Street Elizabethtown, Pa. 



lOOOQQOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOGQOOOOOOOOOOOOOc 

FOR PHOTOGRAPHS 

CALL AT BISHOP'S 

New and Modern Studio 

Elizabethtown, Penna. 
We Guarantee All Work 

See us before having your diploma or those pictures framed. 

AMATEUR FINISHING SOLICITED 

EASTMAN LINE OF KODAKS AND FILMS FOR SALE 



'OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO* 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



CHAS. B. DIEROLF 

DRUGGI ST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



Franklin & Marshall College 

LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 

Offers Liberal Courses in Arts and Sciences 

Campus of 54 acres with ten building 
including Gymnasium and complete Ath- 
letic Field. 

For Catalogue apply to 
HENRY H. APPLE, D.D., LL.D., Pre.. 

GO TO 

HORSTS 

CENTRE SQUARE 

for 

Oysters, Ice Cream, Confectionery 

GANSMAN'S 

Corner North Queen and Orange Streets 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



Men's Reliable Outfitters 

Suits To Order From 
Thirty To Sixty Dollars 



Mfgrs. of Plain Clothing for 39 years 
ONE PRICE — Always the Lowest 



THE BEST THERE IS IN 

HARDWARE 

At the Lowest Possible Price 

BOGGS' QUALITY HARDWARE STORE 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



GO TO 



GUY The BARBER 

HE'S ON THE SQUARE 

Waterman Fountain Pens 

— AT— 

Ream's Book Store 

Y. M. C. A. BUILDING 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



H. H. GOOD 

Gentral Meat Market 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 

Bell Phone 31R4 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

LANCASTER SANITARY MILK CO. 



PASTURfZED MILK 

AND 
CREAMERY BUTTER 



PURITY ICE CREAM 

North and Frederick Sts. 
BOTH PHONES, LANCASTER, PA. 

CLOTHING FOR THE MAN OR BOY 

Complete line of 

SUITS & OVERCOATS 

Suits made to your measure. Men's 

furnishing a specialty. Best make of Shoes 

of all kinds for Men, Ladies and Children. 

Agent for first-class Laundry 



J. N. OLWEILER 
Near Centre Square Elizabethtown 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



EAT 

GiinzenhaiisBr's" Bread 

Delivered by 

E. C. HEILMAN 

Opposite P. R. R. Station Elizabethtown 
Save Your Money by Bringing Your Shoes 

to 

E. W. MILLER 

DEALER IN SHOE FINE 

All Kinds of 

Old Shoe Repairing Neatly Done 

221 South Market Street 

ELIZABETHTOWN, :-: :-: PENNA. 



LUMBER 

AND 

MILL WORK 



We saw timbers 80 ft. and longer and 
deliver a barn complete in a couple weeks. 



B. F. Hiestand & Sons 



MARIETTA, 



PENNA. 



When In Need Of 

HOES 

WHICH WILL GIVE YOU EXTREMELY LONG WEAR COME TO 

The W. A. Withers Shoe Co. 

OLD M4RKET HOUSE BLDG. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 




Prompt, Carelul Attention Given To Mail Orders 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



27 



QUALITY 

LEBANON 

BOLOGNA 

Made in the Most Modern and 

Sanitary Plant 
Manufacturing this Famous Product 



"MORRIS SUPREME" 

FOOD PRODUCTS 

Advertised and known over the 
Entire World 

THE LEBANON BOLOGNA 
and 

PROVISION CO. 

D. B. Buck, Secretary and Mgr. 

H. W. Buck, Distributor 



CLASS PINS AND RINGS 

For Colleges, High Schools, Sunday 
Schools, etc. Illustrated catalog mailed 
upon request. We are also Headquarters 
for Colleges and High School pennants. 
Let us know your wants. 

UNION EMBLEM CO. 
Dept. 89, Palmyra, Pa. 




Imade on honorhbuiltfor serviceI 



Base Ball and Lawn Tennis Goods 

Foot Ball and Basket Ball Goods 

Sporting Goods Of All Kinds 

Books, Stationery and Office 

Supplies 

DUTWEILERS 

813 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, :-: :-: PENNA. 



WHATEVER YOU NEED IN 

MERCHANDISE 

ALWAYS GO TO 

GREENBLATT'S DEPT. STORE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 
IT WILL PAY YOU 




28 OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Conducted on Sanitary Principles 

is the 

RALPH GROSS 

SHAVING PARLOR 

Agency for Manhattan Laundry 



It pays to follow one's best light 
— to put God and Country First, 
ourselves afterwards. 

G. C. Armstrong 



LEHMAN & WOLGEMUTH 

COM L. 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED and FLOUR 
BOTH 'PHONES ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



JOHN M. SHOOKERS 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 

Repairing a Specialty 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 



Kodaks & Films Stationery 

H. K. DORSHEIMER 

Confections Athletic Goods 



)°°°ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo < 

PIANOS-VICTROLAS 

Musical Instruments of Every Description 
Our Line Is Complete 



32 Makes of Pianos, 40 Styles 

Victor, Cheney, Star, Franklin and Solotone Phonograph 
Popular Sheet Music 9c a Copy 



CASH OR EASY PAYMENT PLAN 



KIRK JOHNSON & CO. 

16-18 W. King Street LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 

JOOOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOQ©^ 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



29 



DODGE BROTHERS MOTOR CARS 

R. H. FORNEY 

GARAGE AND REPAIR SHOP 

On North Market Street 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- -:- PENNA. 



Kwick-Lite 
Flashlights 



Kyanize 

Floor Finish 



Joseph H, Rider & son 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

FOR GOOD EATS 

CALL AT 

MornafiUs' Restaurant 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

OYSTERS IN SEASON 

ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 

IT WILL PAY YOU TO VISIT 

HIRSH & 

Centre Square, 



LANCASTER 



for 



Ready-Made and Made-to-Order 

Clothing tor Men and Boys 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

We are one of the largest manufacturers of 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

in the United States 
Strictly One Price To All 

Established in 1854 



KIEFFER & LANDIS 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

Real Estate 

Insurance Collections 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



BOOKS 



BIBLES 



STATIONERY 

Phonographs 



I. A. SHIFFER 



39 S. Market St. 



Elizabeth town 



COLLEGE. HILL DAIRY 

PURE MILK AND CREAM 

Delivered Daily 

S. G. GRAYBILL 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

H. H. BRANDT 

Dealer in all kinds of 
BUILDING MATERIAL 

SLATE AND 

ROOFING PAPER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PEXXA. 



CENTRAL 
MUSIC STORE 



Victrolas, Grafonolas, Records, Stringed 
Instruments, Stationery, Kodaks, Eastman 
Films, Waterman Fountain Pens and 
Greeting cards. 

Films Developed and Primed 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



H. C. Schock, President J. E. Longenecker, V. President 

H. N. Nissly, Cashier 

SECURITY PROGRESS 

UNION NATIONAL MOUNT JOY BANK 



MOUNT JOY, 



PENNA. 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus and Profits $264,000.00 

Deposits .• $1,324,871.00 

An Honor Roll National Bank, Being 421 in Strength in the United States and 

2nd in Lancaster County 

Resources $2,165,000.00 

All Directors Keep in Touch With the Bank's Affairs 

The Bank Board Consists of the Following: 

H. C. Schock Eli F. Grosh I. D. Stehman Christian L. Nissley 

J. E. Longenecker John G. Snyder J. W. Eshleman Johnson B. Keller 

T. M. Breneman Eli G. Reist Samuel B. Nissley S. N. Mumma 

Rohrer Stoner 

WE PAY 4% INTEREST ON CERTIFICATES AND SAVINGS 



SCHMIDT 
BAKERY 



Harrisbura, Pa. 



WHY PAY RENT 



When I can offer you any kind of a 
home from a small property to a 300-acre 
farm at a right price. The interest, taxes 
and insurance on a home will be far less 
than the amount of rent you are paying, 
so why not buy and buy now? If interested 
in buying or selling real estate it will be 
to your advantage to see me. 



JNO. E. SGHROLL 



Both Phones 



Mount Joy, Pa. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




What about the homeyow 
have promisedyourself 

build it NOW 1 



See us for FREE building helps- 
working plans and cost estimates 



We Are Manufacturers of 

Doors and Window Frames, Doors and Sash, Mouldings, Dressers, Shutters and 

Blinds, Porch Work and Columns, Screens and Storm Sash, Hotbed 

Sash, Stair Work and Interior Finish 

And Dealers In 

Rough Lumber, Flooring and Ceiling, Fir Porch Flooring, Building Lime, Sand, 

Plaster, White Finish, Hydrated Lime, Brick, Cement, Asbestos, 

Asphalt, and Roll Roofing, Slate, Wall Board 

WE SPECIALIZE IN THE MANUFACTURE OF 

Shipping Cases and Tobacco Shooks 



We solicit your business and aim to give you prompt and satisfactory ser- 
vice on short notice. It is not necessary that we build for you in order to 
sell you the material; call to see us or 'phone when in the market for any- 
thing in our line and we shall be only too glad to give you our best service. 

Ask for our suggestions and we will cheei-fully help you in planning your 
new buildings or remodeling your old ones. 

ELIZABETHTOWN PLANING MILL 

HOFFER BROS., Proprietors 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



Bell Phone 3R5 
Independent 646A 

)QOOOQQQQQQOQOOOOOOQQQQOQQOQOQOQOQQQOQOOOQGQQOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOO* 



32 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Hertzler's Department Store 

N. E. CORNER CENTRE SQUARE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 




Always Ready to Supply Your Needs Satisfactorily in 
DRY GOODS, STAPLE AND FANCY NOTIONS, BEST GROCERIES, FRUITS, 
SWEETMEATS, SHOES, WINDOW SHADES, QUEENSWARE, MEN'S 
WOMEN'S, BOYS' AND GIRL'S CLOTHING, OIL CLOTH, LINO- 
LEUM, CARPETS, RUGS, ETC. 

Goods displayed on three floors and separate carpet store, three doors 
east of Post Office. 

Agents for made to measure clothing — International Tailoring Co. of New 
York. 

We carry full stocks notwithstanding the great difficulty in obtaining 
goods at these high prices. 

Long experience in merchandising goe with prices of goods purchased here. 

HERTZLER BROS. 

O 

> OOOOOOOCK300CKXXX>0©OOCXX>©©OCK^^ 



J. Hoffman Garber 



Benj. F. Garber 



GARBER GARAGE 



Bell Phone 43R2 

AUTHORIZED 

SALES 

AND 

SERVICE 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 




Ind. Phone 60SA 

GENUINE 

FORD 

PARTS 

ACCESSORIES 



Our Repair Department Is Complete with the Latest Ford Approved Machinery 
Ford Prices Used All Work Guaranteed 

XXXX)OC>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOGOOO'0000000000000000000000000000 



KLEIN'S 

Milk Chocolate 

Almond Bars 



"The Milkiest Kind of Milk Chocolate" 



00000000000000000000000000009000000000000000000000000000 

MUTH BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN 

Coal, Flour, Feed and Lumber 

Our Special Domino Feed 

We aim to give a square deal that will merit 
your trade and friendship 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENNA. 

) 000000000000000 00000000000006 



Elizabethtown College 

The Homelike School 

Stands For 

HIGHER THINKING 

BETTER LIVING AND GREATER SERVICE 



High 
Ideals 

Excellent 
Christian 

Atmosphere 

All Virtues 
At a Premium 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Nov. 13, 8 P. M. College Chapel 
FOUNDER'S DAY 



Nov. 19, 8 P. M. 

Town Market House Hall 

Dr. Herbert Cope's Great Lecture 



Strong 
Faculty 

Best 
Modern 
Methods 

Low 
Rates 



UPRIGHTNESS AND THOROUGHNESS REQUIRED 



OUR MOTTO 



u 



EDUCATE FOR SERVICE' 



If you are looking for a life-work or calling, if you are eager to be of the 
greatest service possible, don't fail carefully to consider the opportunities for 
service in the teaching profession. The touch of the teacher is eternal. The 
teaching profession is calling loudly for worthy young men and women to 
enter this depleted and yet greatest of professions. Elizabethtown College 
offers courses that prepare teachers for the Public Schools, High Schools, 
Colleges, Commercial High Schools, Business Colleges, Mission Fields, Music 
Fields, Bible and Religious Education. 

A TEACHERS' COLLEGE UNDER CLOSE AND CAREFULL CHRISTIAN 

SUPERVISION. 



ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

>CKK>OOOO0O0O0O0O0OOOO0OCXXX>OC>OOOOOOOOOOO000OC)00000OO0OOOOO0OO( 



OOOOCK)OOOOOCX}OOOOOCXX)OOOOOC}OOOCXX}OOOOOOOCXXXXXXX}OOOGOOOCOOCOOO 



The Happy -Healt hful Life 




o 



BUILD A HOME 
OF YOUR OWN 

See us for FREE building helps, 
plans and cost estimates 



We Are Manufacturers of 

Doors and Window Frames, Doors and Sash, Mouldings, Dressers, Shutters and 

Blinds, Porch Work and Columns, Screens and Storm Sash, Hotbed 

Sash, Stair Work and Interior Finish 

And Dealers In 

Rough Lumber, Flooring and Ceiling, Fir Porch Flooring, Building Lime, Sand, 

Plaster, White Finish, Hydrated Lime, Brick, Cement, Asbestos, 

Asphalt, and Roll Roofing, Slate, Wall Board 

WE SPECIALIZE IN THE MANUFACTURE OF 

Shipping Cases and Tobacco Shooks 

We solicit your business and aim to give you prompt and satisfactory ser- 
vice on short notice. It is not necessary that we build for you in order to 
sell you the material; call to see us or 'phone when in the market for any- 
thing in our line and we shall be only too glad to give you our best service. 

Ask for our suggestions and we will cheerfully help you in planning your 
new buildings or remodeling your old ones. 

MILL 



ELIZABETHTOWN PLANING 

HOFFER BROS., Proprietors 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



Bell Phone 3R5 
Independent 646A 



QOQQQOQQOQQQQOOQQQ<ZQQQQQQQQQQOQQQOQQQQQQQGQQQQGQQCQQGQC<)QQQQQ9 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



W. S. SMITH, President PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MaRTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

ELIZABETHTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL $100,000.00 

SURPLUS & PROFITS 144,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited Interest Paid On Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent 

DIRECTORS: 

W. S. Smith Elmer W. Strickler Peter N. Rutt 

F. W. Groff J. S. Risser B. L. Geyer 

E. C. Ginder Amos P. Coble E. E. Coble 

^OQQQOOOQQQOOQQOQQQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQQQQOOOOOOOOOOOQf 



oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 

I ELIZABETHTOWN EXCHANGE BANK 1 



J Now Occupies Its New Bank Building { 

> Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent c 

| Fays Interest on Time Deposits | 

I « 

! OFFICERS i 

> ( 

| A. G. HEISEY, President ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. \ 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier i 

; I. H. STAUFFER, Asst. Cashier C. A. COBLE, Teller \ 

\ DIRECTORS 

I A. G. Heisey H E Landis B. H. Greider | 

I Allen A. Coble n t^ x, M. K. Forney ( 

! H. J. Gish Geo.D.Boggs W . A. Withers 

! Jos. G. Heisey E - E - Hernle y A. C. Fridy 

I oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooc ( 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



PLAIN 
CLOTHING 



WATT & SHAND 



Centre Square 



LANCASTER, PA. 



GEORGE S. DAUGHERTY GO. 

N. York-Chicago-Pittsburg 



Quality No. 10* fruits and vege- 
tables in No. 10 tins. 



DODGE BROTHERS MOTOR CARS 

R. H. FORNEY 

GARAGE AND REPAIR SHOP 

On North Market Street 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- -:- PENNA. 



PATRONIZE 

OUR 

ADVERTISERS 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SINCE THE DAYS OF THE GOLDSMITHS 

The goldsmiths of olden times, with whom banking had its be- 

< ginning, undertook only to safeguard money and valuables en- 

< trusted to their care. 

Banks have increased their activities since that time until they 

< have become an indipensable factor in the finance and commerce 

< of all civilized nations. 

The modern business man and woman who make full use of 

< their bank looks upon it as an institution dealing in business in- 

< telligence as well as money and credit. 

We invite business men and women to make use of all our fa- 
\ cilities for service. 

The Farmers' National Bank 

LITITZ, PENNA. 

\ S. W.-Buch, President J. H. Breitigan, Cashier. 

'QOGGOOOQOOQOOQQQQOOQOOQQQQOOQOQQOGQQOOQOGOQQOOQOQOOOOOOOOOOO^ 



|OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCKXXXXXXXKXXXK>OOOOOOOOOOOCX>000^ 

KEYSTONE NATIONAL BANK 

MANHEIM, PENNSYLVANIA 

CAPITAL $ 125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS 165,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 1,500,000 

FOUR PER CENT. INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS 
ACCOUNTS LARGE OR SMALL SOLICITED 

J OFFICERS 

John B. Shenk, President 
H. M. Beamesderfer, Vice-President H. A. Merkey, Teller 
J. G. Graybill, Cashier Norman Weaver, Clerk 

Clair H. Keen, Asst. Cashier Anna Shollenberger, Clerk 

| DIRECTORS 

H. M. Beamesderfer ■ l o u •. R. O. Diehl 

Jacob ti. Hershey 
John R. Cassel John B. Hossler 

Morris B. Ginder J ' B * Shenk W. W. Moyer 



OUR TRUST DEPARTMENT CAN SERVE YOU AS 

Executor, Administrator, Assignee, Receiver, Guardian 
Agent, Attorney in Fact, Registrar 
OF STOCKS AND BONDS, ETC. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



McLaughlin Bros. 
DRAYMEN 


Trimmer's Great 
Bargain Emporium 


LOCAL, LONG DISTANCE HAULING 
26 Washington Street 


On the Square 


ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
BELL PHONE 39-R2 


ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 


MARTIN 

READY-MADE AND MADE -TO-ORDER 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 

CLOTHING 


Elizabethtown Roller Mills 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 
FLOUR, CORN MEAL AND FEED 


FURNISHINGS AND SHOES 


J. V. BINKLEY, Propr. 


ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 


402-404 South Market St. 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Pa. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MOUNT JOY, PA. 



Thomas J. Brown 
Jacob S. Carmany 
H. H. Myers 
Abraham L. Nissley 



directors: 

Gabriel Moyer 
Jos. B. Hostetter 
B. S. Stauffer 
Jno. W. Newcomer 
Amos N. Musser 



H. Roy Nissley 
Jacob N. Hershey 
E. S. Gerberich 
Henry H. Eby 



Capital $125,000.00 



Surplus & Profits $150,000.00 



officers: 

THOMAS J. BROWN, President J. S. CARMANY, Vice President 

R. FELLENBAUM, Cashier 

4% Paid on Savings Accounts and Time Certificates. Resources $1,600,000 



^ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooocxxxx$ooooocxx>ooooooc 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SOUTH END GROCERY 

FRESH, FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES, CANDIES AND LUNCH GOODS 
"The little store with big business" 

Levi C. Hershey 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



A. W. CAIN 

DRUGGIST 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 

THE BETTER REPAIRING OF THE 

BARNES SHOE SHOP 

WILL GRATIFY YOU 

It's Real Economy 

43 South Market St ELIZABETHTOWN 

NISSLEY'S LUNCH & DINING ROOMS 

David D. Clare, Proprietor 

14-16 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER. PENNA, 



LANCASTER SCHOOL SUPPLY CO. 

L. B. Herr & Son 
Booksellers 

Stationeries 

Printers 

46-48 W. King St. LANCASTER, PA. 

THE GROSS 
CONFECTIONERY 

122 S. Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



BARD-BLANKENMYER CO., Inc. 

plumbingTheating 

and SHEET METAL WORK 



118 South Queen Street, 



LANCASTER, PA. 



GUNSMITH 



LOCKSMITH 



DOMN1TZ BROS. 

If it's a (LOCK) key, we have it 
222^ N. Q. St. LANCASTER, PA. 



A, C. McLANACHAN 
BARBER 

21 E. High St 

Second Door From Post Office 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



BUCH MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



WE BUILD THE FOLLOWING GOODS IN 

THE COLLEGE TOWN 



Wheelbarrows, Corn Shelters, Wood Saws, 
Land Rollers, Pulverizers, Water Troughs 



HENRY L. GISE 



Notary Public, Surveyor and Conveyancer 

Insurance of all Kinds 

Agent for 

State Capital Savings and Loan 

Association 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



J. W. G. Hershey, Pres. 

J. Bitzer Johns, V. Pres. 

Henry R. Gibbel, Sec. & Treas. 



The Lititz Agricultural 

Mutual Fire 

Insurance Company 



PHONOGRAPHS 

We handle only one make and that is the 



EDISON 



WHY ? 
Call at 



Insures against Lightning, Storm and Fir* 

Insurance in force $39,000,000 
Issues both Cash and Assessment Policies 



FISHER'S 

8 Centre Square 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



EBY SHOE COMPANY 

Incorporated 
Manufacturers of 

MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S 

FINE WELT AND TURNED 

SHOES 



13 EAST MAIN STREET 
LITITZ, PENNA. 



LITITZ, 



PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



HEATING and PLUMBING 




Miller Pipeless Furnaces 

and 
Leader Water Systems 



KOB 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

0O0O0000O0OOO00O0OOOOO0O0O0O0( 



J. W. ZMRP088 


CHAS. K. MUSSER 


GENERAL HARDWARE 

Sporting and Housefurnishing 
Goods 


Electrical 
Contractor 




All Kinds of 




Electrical Supplies and Fixtures 


ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 


HOUSE WIRING A SPECIALTY 


POTTS DEPARTMENT STORE 


The Ephrata Review 


"EPHRATA'S BIGGEST BEST STORE" 


$1.50 A YEAR 

Best Job Printing 


EBERLY BROTHERS 


SHOES COAL 


YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 


Main & State S. State St. 








Ephrata, Pa. 


Chas. S. Yeager, Propr. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



HIVE 




HIVE 



DEPARTMENT STORE 



OUR CREED 



We believe in the goods we are selling in our ability 
to get results. We believe that honest goods can be sold 
to honest people by honest methods. We believe in work- 
ing, not wasting; in laughing, not crying; in boosting, 
not knocking; and in the pleasure of doing business. We 
believe that a man gets what he goes after; that a cus- 
tomer today is worth two customers tomorrow; and that 
no man is down and out until he has lost faith in himself. 
We believe in courtesy, in kindness, in generosity, in good 
cheer, in friendship, and in honest competition. We be- 
lieve in increasing our business, and that the way to do 
it is to reach for it. 



WE ARE REACHING FOR YOURS 



A. A. ABELE 

ELIZABETHTOWN. 

>OOOOOOOOOCXXXXXX>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOI 



EVERY MAN IN HIS HUMOR. 



I'm forever counting money— Miss 
Grosh. 

Everybody knows John Bechtel 
by his walk. 

Who can make baked beans like 
Kathryn, the cook? 

Mr. Liskey goes home every week 
end to help his father? ? ? 

When you hear "Now then, boys" 
you can be sure Dan is around. 

No one can look half so blank as 
Miss Hershey upon "certain" occa- 
sions. 

Are there sounds of merry laugh- 
ter? Look around and you will see 
Miss F. Moyer. 

He is never happy unless he is 
teasing some one. Who could it be 
but Mr. Sherman. 

When blue and in need of a good 
laugh, apply to Flavia Martz or 
Herbert Leon Cope. 

Do you ever hear any "loud" noi- 
ses? Then be sure Paul (with a 
glass eye) is around. 

Pats will have a good time, chap- 
eron or no chaperon, in the library 
or out, in Lititz or "Hard-to-tell." 
1 Getting her words mixed Miss S. 

Martz said that horses are more use- 
ful than men. Question : Does she 
| mean that? 

The most recent visitors who have 
registered are Messrs. Zendt and 
Edris. They report as being greatly 
pleased with the progress of the 
new buildings and the school in gen- 
eral especially the occupants of Al- 
pha Hall. 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Jacob S. Harley 

Associate Editor Florence T. Moyer 

Departmental Editor H. H. Nye 

Alumni Editor L. W. Leiter 

Religious News Editor Ezra M. Wenger 

^ Emma Ziegler 
School News ] 

( Stanley Ober 

Business Manager J. Z. Herr 

Circulation Manager E. G. Meyer 

Our College Times is published monthly during the Academic year of Elizabeth- 
town College. 

This paper will have to be discontinued as soon as the time of subscription expires 
as an action of the United States legislature. 

Please renew in time and report any change of address to the business manager. 

Subscription rates one dollar per year; fifteen cents per copy; six subscriptions 
$5.00 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



November 

A nurse with soft and tender touch 

Is gloomy eyed November 

She roams thru wood and meadow 

lands 
Where little flowers are peeping, 
She sings to them soft lullabies, 
And tucks them up for sleeping; 
She covers them with blanket white, 
With soft and fleecy lining 
Then whispers, "Little flowers, 

Goodnight," 
Till skies of spring are shining. 



Trifles make perfection — 
But perfection is no trifle. 



It is a comely fashion to be glad 
Joy is the grace we say to God. 
Jean Ingelon. 



It is a good thing to be rich, 
And a good thing to be strong, 
But it is a better thing to 
Be beloved of many friends. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



THE SIGNIFICANCE OF 
THANKSGIVING DAY 



HOW DIVINE THE HUMAN IS 



Year after year the chief execu- 
tive of these United States pro- 
claims a day of general thanksgiv- 
ing. The significance of this holi- 
day is that we recognize the hand 
of God throughout the centuries of 
or nation's history. When the 
American expeditionary forces 
went over-seas in the recent fight 
for freedom, He decreed the flag 
they bore should never touch the 
ground in defeat. In the darkest hour 
of the Civil War His omnipotent 
arm sustained the Union forces and 
hence the Confederate line wavered 
at Cemetery Ridge. He intervened 
at Princeton and shielded Washing- 
ton, as that intrepid general, amid 
a hail of bullets, rallied the little 
patriot band, the last hope and stay 
of independence, at a moment when 
they were all but overwhelmed. 
It was His hand that guided the 
Mayflower across the waters when 
the billows of the Atlantic had al- 
most crushed her trail timbers. 

The Pilgrim Fathers did well to 
institute this holiday as with rejoic- 
ing they gathered around their 
homely board and thanked God for 
his protection in every danger on 
that first Thanksgiving Day at 
Plymouth in 1621. Could Ameri- 
cans but appreciate his providence 
more fully and cling to Him more 
closely. From a hundred thousand 
pulpits all over this land let the 
warning voice ring out, let the true 
thanksgiving message be heard : 
"America, forget not thy God." 



Jesus Savior, 

Friend most dear, 
Dwell thou with us 

. Daily here ; 
By thine own life teach us this 
How divine the human is. 

The above lines by Lucy Larcom 
are a sweet and holy prayer. He 
who lived in a Galilee village and 
mingled with the wayfarers on sea 
and land to show us how divine the 
human is, still moves about daily 
here on earth in the life of many a 
mortal, teaching us the same golden 
lesson. On every hand in nature we 
may see the impress of the divine, 
but nowhere so clearly as in the 
inner spirit of a man or woman. 
And who will say that sin and de- 
basement are not merely the dross 
concealing the luster of the gem, 
the tarnish covering the sparkle of 
the divine which is present in every 
immortal soul? What a revelation, 
could we but see into a human heart 
and read there clearly the aspira- 
tions, the purified impulses, the vi- 
sions of something glorious, the no- 
ble strivings against odds of hered- 
ity and environment! Each man in 
his better moments is a god ; and 
we find man at his best when we ap- 
peal to that which is regal within 
him. Then, as in a flash, as in a 
dream of delight, comes the re- 
sponse which reveals to us "how 
divine the human is." 



Not what we gain, but what we 
give measures the worth of the life 
we live. 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Literary 



The Honor System 



The Honor System was started by 
Thomas Jefferson in 1825. He in- 
corporated the ideals of the honor 
system into the foundations of the 
University of Virginia at the time 
that it was founded. He made the 
pupils that were under the system 
sign a paragraph to their papers 
that ran like this : 

I, A. B., do hereby certify that I 
have derived no assistance during 
the time of this examination from 
any source whatsoever, whether 
oral, or written, or in print, in giv- 
ing the above answers. 

This was later shortened to : 

I hereby certify that I 
have received no assistance in this 
examination. 

The honor system can be made to 
work wonders for a school, or it 
may be almost a detriment if it is 
not managed properly. 

The honor system consists in put- 
ting the reins of government into 
the hands of the people that are to 
be governed. They are put on their 
honor that they will do what is 
honorable and only that. Under 
the old regime the pupil was ex- 
pected to cheat if he could get 
away with it, or why would they 
have men there to see that they did 
not cheat and crib. This was the 
way students, or at least many of 
them, did; if they could get away 
with cribbing when the professor 
was there to see that they did not 
crib, it was perfectly legal. Then 
with the coming honor system this 



idea was changed in the heads of 
many of the students, and greatly 
for the better. They got a new con- 
ception of the relation of the stu- 
dent to the professor. Under the 
new system it was not honorable to 
cheat. 

Student honor is now regarded 
only in part the relation to the 
ethical side of the student. Former- 
ly the student was appealed to his 
ethical side, now they appealed to 
the pride, and conscience of the 
student. 

The honor of the student is now 
appealed to mainly in examinations 
and in athletics. This is a deplor- 
able fact because every one should 
be honorable in all things that he 
undertakes. The student honor 
should be given neither praise nor 
blame, but recognition, enlighten- 
ment, and cooperation. 

This code of honor has been tried 
in many large schools and they all, 
with the exception of Harvard, say 
that it is a wonderful thing. Har- 
vard's objection to it is that it 
trains the minds of the students in 
such a way that they resent the 
supervision of anybody in after life. 
But, the honor system teaches the 
things that we may never get in 
after life while we are able to learn 
that some men must be in super- 
vision over us. 

The schools that have tried the 
honor system report that without 
the honor system cheating and crib- 
bing invariably resulted. With the 
honor system the pupils very seldom 
go over the bounds of the promise 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



they made by signing their 
names to the pledge as given. Of 
course you will always find some 
students that will cheat whether 
they are under the honor system or 
not. These are few and far between, 
and can not be stopped by any 
means. Such cases as these are 
generally dealt with by the student 
body that is governing, and the re- 
sult is generally that the student is 
expelled or suspended. 

Princeton is a very good example 
of the tryout of the honor system. 
Up to the time that the honor sys- 
tem began to be used the students 
were continually cheating. It was a 
fact that three men were not able 
to keep a class of fifty from cheat- 
ing, and that cheating went on 
under the very eyes of the profes- 
sors. 

In conclusion, the honor system is 
a good thing for a school ; firstly, 
because it develops in the student 
an idea of fair play, not only in 
athletics, but in all the activities 
that a student participates in ; and, 
secondly, because it develops a sense 
of being able to take care of ourself 
and to control oneself without the 
need of somebody overseeing ev- 
erything that he does and taking 
away all his initiative. A. T. M. 



The God of Nature 

Look where you will, every- 
where, in everything you see God 
thru his work in Nature. To the 
primeval men everything about 
them was an emblem of the God- 
like, of some God. If you cannot 



God today when you see the beauti- 
ful flowers or the smallest blade of 
grass, then you do not really know 
the true God at all. You may not 
be able to express your thoughts 
and feelings as the painter or poet, 
but it is a proof, Carlyle says, of 
your appreciation of that supreme 
Being if you see that every object 
has in it some divine beauty. The 
eye is merely a window thru which 
we may see in some measure the 
infinitude itself. 

Today, Carlyle says again, we 
have to be taught thru a Prophet or 
Poet to appreciate nature ; but in 
the time of the primeval man, they 
worshipped nature and saw for 
themselves the wonderful and mar- 
velous power back of it all. They 
tried to express this feeling of 
reverence and admiration by wor- 
shiping their gods, which were per- 
sonifications of the forces of na- 
ture. The world was divine to these 
earnest people, and we believe that 
their worship of nature was as 
sacred to them as the Christian 
religion is to us. We can learn 
from them true reverence and wor- 
ship. 

As we look at nature and see God 
revealing himself to us through the 
external world, how forcibly it 
should remind us of the vital rela- 
tion existing between Him as the 
highest God and ourselves the 
crowning point of his creation. It is 
our duty, nay rather, our privilege, 
to try in the best way possible to 
give back to him what is in our 
power to give, to give our lives for 
Him, and in His service. M. O. 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Personals 



Woe unto them that have ears 
and hear not. Miss Brubaker does 
not belong in this class for she was 
heard to say : "I heard him smile." 



What is still needed in the library 
is a box of pepper or snuff for Judy 
will surely come to grief if she does 
not get something to assist her to 
sneeze. 



Student (seeing Prof. Harley read 
ing a letter) "Prof, did you receive 
a love letter?" 

Prof. H. : "Well, don't you think 
it is about time?" 



Miss Ober translating French.: 
"An old pheasant (peasant) came to 
the house of an optician and asked 
for some glasses." 



Prof. M. too, makes mistakes 
sometimes as Miss Walker can tes- 
tify. His weakness is to get names 
mixed. 



While journeying thru the ladies 
dorm we came to the following pla- 
ces where refreshments may be had, 
if one comes when they are served : 
Tumble Inn, Hoboes Retreat, Dew 
Drop Inn and Pour Inn. 



Said Peggie: "The blackbird has 
black feathers in the library." 



Miss Brubaker found it impossible 
to sit still in school Management in 
Room E, while the harmonious 
strains of music of "I Love You" 
penetrating the walls as well as her 



heart, were sung by the great bari- 
tone soloist. 



Miss J. O. "Every class in the 
hand went up." 



Mr. Hornafius: "Suppose a man 
gives a note and before it matures 
he goes in the hole, what happens?" 



Prof. Herr: "If there are seventy- 
two inches in a fathom, how many 
feet in a fathom?" 

Miss Seiders: "Twenty." 



Prof. H. : "Give the reason for the 
decrease in the birth rate in the 
United States." 

Mr. Zug: "Poor people have sev- 
en and eight children and a dog. 



Mr. E. Meyer is an exceptional 
child as he is one of the few men 
who are gifted along the line of mu- 
sic. However we want to save him 
from an embarrassing situation. 
Ask him or the vocal music class for 
further information. 



Prof. Meyer: "Mr. Fasnacht, 
which of these ladies did best?" 

Mr. F.: "Well, Miss Oellig said 
the most." 



Prof. Meyer: "What about the 
number of questions?" 

Miss Kreider: "Why you should- 
n't ask so many." 



Miss J. Oellig in library: "Prof. 
Hoffer do you have the Old Ladies 
Home Journal?" 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



Departmental Notes 



ENGLISH. 

Classes in English have been or- 
ganized for the needs of our stu- 
dents in the college department and 
in the preparatory. One group are 
mastering the grammatical princi- 
ples which form the basis of correct 
speech. Others are practicing, un- 
der direction, the use of the mother 
tongue, striving to speak and write 
it with skill, and elegance. Still 
others are tracing the development 
of our literature from Anglo-Saxon 
times to the present, and are noting 
how each age in its peculiar way, 
enriched the store of permanent 
writings. And, lastly, a class is tak- 
ing up particular works of standard 
authors and endeavoring to see 
more fully and clearly in what their 
merit consists. It is hoped we can 
bring our students to realize that 
their native language is full of rich- 
est association ; that the genera- 
tions of mankind have furnished the 
world no nobler instrument for the 
transmission and preservation of 
thoughts of eternal truth and beau- 
ty. 



THE CHILD AND EDUCATION. 

The schools, the allies of our 
homes, are engaged in "raising 
children" and it is to the best inter- 
est of society to produce the finest 
type of child — strong of body, intel- 
ligent of mind, sweet and sincere 
of spirit. No child need ever "fail" 
in getting an education. All may 
flourish and succeed. The educa- 



tional process must aim to fit every- 
body. A sound, accomplished, beau- 
tiful body and an intelligent, sym- 
pathetic mind, a sweet sincere spirit 
and a magnanimous soul — these 
are the immediate ends in educa- 
tion. 

To attain these ends, through ed- 
ucation, we are requiring a careful 
study of the development of the 
child and the nature and needs of 
childhood. The supreme question 
for education is "What are the in- 
terests and latent instincts of child- 
hood?" The child is too unformed, 
too unripe, too immature to know 
what is best for him ox to be per- 
mitted "to do as he pleases." We 
need to train teachers whose heart 
is in their work, teachers who look 
upon education as growth, teachers 
who recognize in the immature 
child a richness of possibilities that 
craves for guidance and exercise. 



MATHEMATICS. 

The work in mathematics in the 
Preparatory Department, only, 
shall be considered here, a consider- 
ation of College Mathematics being 
postponed until a later time. 

Two ends should be sought in the 
teaching of Elementary Mathemat- 
ics — facility and accuracy in calcu- 
lation, and the development of the 
principles underlying the various 
mathematical processes. The first 
of these is secured, then painstaking 
drill and the constant insistence up- 
on high standards of work. The 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



second, the development of princi- 
ples, is reached through the use of 
a large number of illustrative ex- 
amples embodying the principles 
and their modifying phrases. The 
use of many examples to bring out 
a single principle is always in order 
in Elementary Mathematics. 

Arithmetic, Elementary Algebra, 
Plane and Solid Geometry are the 
subjects in Elementary Mathemat- 
ics now offered in our school. Two 
or three terms are devoted to Arith- 
metic, depending upon the ability 
of the student; one and one-half 
years is the normal minimum re- 
quired for the completion of Ele- 
mentary Algebra through Quadrat- 
ics; Plane and Solid Geometry re- 
quire an equal amount of time. In 
the Spring term, special classes in 
Arithmetic and Elementary Algebra 
will be formed for teachers who de- 
sire review and drill in these sub- 
jects. 



DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE 
AND COMMERCE. 

The New Era which we are about 
entering will be the great age of 
Commerce. Wealth will be multi- 
plied and the majority of men and 
women will engage in some form of 
business. What message is the 
church going to give to the business 
world? Will our one hundred and 
thirty Business Alumni assist in the 
proper guidance of business and 
lead our feet into the way of peace. 

Business is not a mean thing ex- 
cept to mean men. Christ himself 
went into business as a carpenter 



and his work became as noble as 
Himself. Work is an expression of 
personality. It is high or low as the 
man is noble or mean. After a 
time it makes a reputation and 
hands down a tradition. If the tra- 
dition is noble, good men seek to 
enter the profession, but if the tra- 
dition is bad it is left to bad men. 

We can be Christians in business, 
if we go to business as Christians, 
but not otherwise. 

The Church will never bring 
peace to the industrial world by 
meddling with rates of wages and 
hours of labor. It must strike at the 
root of the evil. It must take away 
gold as a selfish objective of mas- 
ters and men and turn its gold into 
an ideal of common service. The 
war has revealed the vast but la- 
tent store of goodness in! human 
nature. Class has vied with class in 
unselfish and heroic endeavor and 
no class has been more to the fore 
than those engaged in business and 
industry. Rich and poor have stood 
together in the deadly trench and 
have sacrificed themselves for the 
common good. We have seen this 
remarkable outburst of 'unselfish- 
ness because in place of gold and 
material prosperity, men had set 
before them an ideal worthy of the 
best that was in them. 



For good you are, and bad, and 
like to coins, 

Some true, some light; 

But everyone of you stamped 
with the image of the King. 

Tennyson. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

"Thank you for your most sweet 
voices." — Shakespeare. 

The many sweet voices on College 
Hill make the halls resound with 
beautiful melodies and rich harmon- 
ies. You can hear them at all hours 
of the day, for there are two score 
Voice and Piano students, one La- 
dies Quartet, three Male Quartets, 
two Glee Clubs and a Chorus Class, 
all doing their bit to make College 
Hill the abiding place of Polymon- 
ia. 

Forty-six per cent, of the students 
enrolled in the school are studying 
in one or more courses in music. 

The Quartets and Glee Clubs fur- 
nished the music for the Anniver- 
sary Program given November the 
thirteenth. 

The Chorus is at work on the 
Christmas Cantata entitled "The 
Wondrous Light," which will be giv- 
en ion Saturday night, December} 
the eighteenth at 8 o'clock in the 
College Chapel. The cantata is di- 
vided into two parts. The first part 
dealing with the Shepherds, the sec- 
ond part dealing with the Magi. 
Other numbers of the Christmas 
Musical will be Piano Solos, Duets, 
Trios, and Vocal Solos, and Quar- 
tets. 

We heartily invite everybody to 
this program for we have something 
worth the while to give to you. 



Look up! and not down; 
Out! and not in; 
Forward ! and not back ; 
And lend a hand. 



A Man and His Shoe 

How much a man is like his shoes, 

For instance, both a sole may lose. 

Both have been tanned, 

Both get left and right, 

Both are made to go on feet, and 

Both need a mate to be complete. 

They both need healing; oft are 
soled 

And both in time will turn to mold. 

With shoes the last is first, 

With men the first shall be last: 

And when the shoes wear out 

They're mended next, 

When men wear out 

They're men dead too. 

They both are trod upon, 

And both will tread upon 

Each other, nothing loathe. 

Both have their ties, ,and both in- 
cline 

When polished, in the world to 
shine. 

And both peg out, 

Now would you choose 

To be a man, or be his shoes? 



Go put your creed into your deed. 

Emerson. 



The best way out of difficulty is 
through it. 



The right way to live is as if each 
day were our best and last. 



Faith in God, Faith in man, 
Stand behind the words, "I can." 



Memory is the lever by which we 
make the engine of time run back- 
wards. 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Literary Society Notes 



KEYSTONE LITERARY SOCIETY. 

When one morning in Chapel the 
Faculty Committee on Literary So- 
cieties gave the plan for the found- 
ing of three new societies we real- 
ized that it marked the passing of 
the Keystone, founded twenty years 
ago. 

This society has had many varied 
programs during its existence. The 
last Hallowe'en program was spe- 
cially interesting and pleasing. The 
gymnasium was decorated with corn 
fodder and pumpkins; in one corner 
was the witches' trysting-place ; with 
the lights dimmed and the society 
members all seated on corn fodder, 
the wierdness of the occasion was 
felt. The program was very good, 
the subject of each feature pertain- 
ing to Hallowe'en. 

The last regular program was 
held in chapel as usual. The last 
feature of the program was the sing- 
ing of part of the K. L. S. song after 
which we adjourned, and now the 
Keystone Literary Society must ever 
be remembered as belonging to the 
past. 

Because of all the pleasant times 
spent in its activities, those who 
have in any way been connected 
with it should ever cherish and mem- 
ories of "Our Dear Old K. L. S." 

May the spirit of its motto, "Ex- 
celsior," live on. V. R. H. 



THE HOMERIAN SOCIETY. 

At the passing of the Key- 
stone Literary Society, three new 
societies sprang into existence of 
which the Homerian was one. This 
society was really not altogether 
new, for it was started nine years 
ago, but it had been dormant for the 
past two years. Some changes hav^e 
been made, however. The consti- 
tution has been revised, which was 
quite a lengthy and tedious task 
and almost cost the society their 
supper one night. Those eligible 
for membership in this society are 
"all students pursuing or having 
pursued a minimum of eight hours 
of work of college rank.'' All work 
done on the programs is put on a 
class room basis, the student receiv- 
ing credit for it on a course in Eng- 
lish. 

The motto is "Possunt, quia possi 
videntur." The colors are green 
and buff. 

The society was begun with a 
membership of forty. This will 
mean that each member will get the 
chance to serve on the program 
more frequently than under the 
Keystone system. We believe that 
this work will be a great benefit to 
its members, and will bring forth 
worth while results. So here's to a 
year of hard work and pleasure to 
the Homerians. E. Z. 



Those who bring sunshine to the 
lives of others cannot keep it from 
themselves. J. M. Barrie 



The most deluded people in the 
world are those who think happi- 
ness lies in a multitude of posses- 
sions. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



PENN LITERARY SOCIETY. 

The object of this society as set 
forth in our constitution is the men- 
tal, moral and social culture of its 
members. 

As we look from our western win- 
dows at the green wheat fields in the 
distance, and back of them, the gold 
of the sunsets which belong to the 
close of an Autumn day, we have 
before us our colors, green and gold. 

Although we know it will require 
hard work and continued interest 
on the part of every member to 
make our society worth while, and 
the best on the Hill, we know it can 
be done if we keep our motto in 
mind : 'Labor Conquers Everything.' 

E. K. Z. 



THE FRANKLIN KEYSTONE 
SOCIETY. 

The Franklin Keystone Society 
met in private session and elected 
the following officers: President, 
Daniel E. Myers; Vice President, 
Clarence H. Holsopple ; Secretary, 
Grace H. Ober; Treasurer, Henry 
G. Bucher; Chorister, Anna Enter- 
line; Critic, Elizabeth Meyer. 

The first public meeting was held 
November 19th, 1920. An interest- 
ing program was well rendered. It 
was well attended and interest man- 
ifested was splendid. 

All our friends who are interested 
in work of this kind, are heartily in- 
vited to attend all our public ses- 
sions. G. H. O. 



Thanksgiving Day 
John Kendrick Bangs 

For summer rain and winter's sun. 

For autumn's breezes crisp and 
sweet, 
For labors doing, to be done, 

And labors all complete ; 
For April, May and lovely June ; 

For bud and bird and berried 
vine, 
For joys of morning, night and noon 

My thanks, dear Lord, are Thine! 

For loving friends on every side, 

For country and for liberty, 
For all the blessed Heavens wide, 

And for the sounding sea ; 
For mountains, valleys, forests deep 

For maple, oak and lofty pine. 
For rivers on their sea'ward sweep 

My thanks, dear Lord, are Thine ! 

For light and air, for sun and shade, 

For children merry, and for cheer 
For music and the glad parade 

Of blessings through the year; 
For all the fruitful earths increase 

For home and life and love divine 
For hope and faith and perfect 
peace 

My thanks, dear Lord, are Thine ! 



Smile Awhile 
Smile awhile 
And while you smile, another 

smiles, 
And soon there's miles and miles of 

smiles, 
And life's worth-while, 
Because you smile. 



When the fight begins within 
himself a man's worth something. 

Browning. 



Kindness is a language that the 
Deaf can hear and the Dumb un- 
derstand. 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Religious Notes 



THE VISIT OF THE TRAVELING 
SECRETARY. 

C. H. Shamberger, the traveling 
secretary of the Student Volunteers 
came Sunday, November 14th. In 
the evening he addressed the Chris- 
tian Workers' meeting and also 
preached a short sermon on "Love.." 

On Monday and Tuesday his time 
was taken in personal interviews 
with students concerning plans for 
their life work. He also met with 
the Volunteer Band and discussed 
plans with them. Monday and Tues- 
day morning he conducted our 
Chapel services and gave messages 
to the student body. In these ad- 
dresses he showed to us our respon- 
sibility toward the making of a 
'new world.' 

"I have come to the conclusion 
that those people who say school 
life is something entirely different 
from 'life' do not understand what 
school life really is : for in school 
you meet just as real problems as 
in what they term 'life.' 

Some of the most vital problems 
which an individual has to solve he 
meets between fourteen and eight- 
een in many cases younger at their 
stage of his mental and spiritual 
development some of the greatest 
religious problems have to be met 
and mastered. The majority of mis- 
sionaries made their life decision 
during this period. 

The high note in the messages 
was the great necessity for deci- 
sions based on reason and God's will 



"Every college student should in 
his decision be sure that he has 
struck God's plan — that his will is 
in tune with the will of God.' 

"Every missionary on the foreign 
field represents twenty-five thous- 
and people in the homeland. May 
>>e God wants YOU on the foreign 
H-rld?" "Even tho God does not 
w ant all of us on the foreign field 
I et our wills must be just as fully 
\ielded to Him to serve here." 

The students could not help but 
be inspired when considering the 
bigness of the task ahead and their 
responsibility to it. These messa- 
ges brought to us shall surely be 
remembered by those who respond- 
ed to the challenge. V. H. 



STEVENS HILL. 

This outpost Sunday School is 
now in the midst of a revival meet- 
ing with Prof .Ezra Wenger as evan- 
gelist. The meetings began Novem- 
ber fourteenth with a fair attend- 
ance. Interest in the meetings is 
growing continually judging from 
the increased attendance and spirit 
of the meetings. 

A number of students directly in- 
terested in the saving of souls have 
banded themselves together into a 
prayer group holding their meetings 
every noon. These students have 
pledged themselves as personal 
workers to do whatever God calls 
them to do in these meetings. They 
fully believe that personal work 
done is the greatest part of the 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



meetings. For in no other way can 
souls be won for Christ so effective- 
ly as thru personal work. 

This work will not only be help- 
ful to the people of that community 
but the personal workers them- 
selves, for they will be 'revived' and 
drawm nearer to God. 

Means for transportation are pro- 
vided for the workers so that every 
evening a part of the group are at 
the meeting. 

A prayer service is conducted in 
the Sunday School room every even- 
ing before the church service. 

We shall not attempt to tabulate 
results as yet but thru 'prayer' w T e 
know God will send the results in 
His own way and in His own time. 

V. H. 



Alumni Notes 



Self mastery is the essence of 
Heroism. 



You cannot do w r rong without 
suffering wrong. 



Faithful following of Christ is 
Faith. Dr. Grenfell. 



Progress is the law of life. 
Man is not man as yet. 

Browning 

We are gratified with the splend- 
id record made by these alumni : 
We congratulate them! Our good 
wishes are with them for continued 
success and larger service to their 
fellowman. 



Isaac J. Kreider, '16, is Principal 
of the Denver High School, Denver, 
Pa. 

Jacob H. Gingrich '17, is engaged 
in teaching expression in Bethany 
Bible School, Chicago, 111. 

E. M. Crouthamel '11, has re- 
turned to Butler, Pa., where he has^ 
charge of the Department of Math- 
ematics in the High School. 

Francis L. Olweiler '11, is engag- 
ed in business in the W. A. Withers 
Shoe Co., Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Owen Hershey '15, is assisting the 
firm, Hershey & Gibbel, Lititz, Pa., 
and reading law under the direction 
of Mr. Kready, a well known lawyer 
of Lancaster, Pa. 

Linaeus B. Earhart '10, is in 
charge of the General Science of the 
Philadelphia High School. He is 
likewise pursuing work at the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 

Holmes S. Falkenstein '10, is an- 
other representative of our College 
on the Faculty of the Philadelphia 
High School. He is teaching Eng- 
lish. 

Henry K. Eby '09, is continuing 
his work as Principal of the Holli- 
daysburg High School, Hollidays- 
burg, Pa. 

Alice Gertrude Newcomer, '08. 
has again resumed teaching after 
a vacation of a few years. She has 
charge of a school near Quincy, Pa. 

Jacob E. Myers, '11, is teaching 
in the High School of Hanover, Pa. 
He is likewise serving in the minis- 
try. During the past Summer he 
conducted a successful evangelistic 
service in the Shady Grove church. 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



College Hill Chronicle 



Thanksgiving 

For the earth and all its beauty, 

The sky and all its light; 
For the dim and soothing shadows 

That rest the dazzled sight; 
For unfading fields and prairies 

Where sense in vain has trod; 
For the world's exhaustless beauty 

I thank Thee, O my God. 



That Hike! 



On Nov. 6 the great Fall Outing 
of the entire student body and 
teachers was held. The day was 
spent at Conewago exploring the 
ravine and roaming the hills. The 
natural landscape was gorgeous 
with its rocks, stream and brilliant- 
ly colored trees. A lunch was eaten 
in the out-of-doors displaying very 
healthy appetites on the part of all. 
The caliber of our students was 
shown in the fact that all but two 
of the sixty eight on the outing, 
walked from Conewago to College 
Hill, arriving here thoroughly tired 
but satisfied that a glorious day of 
recreation had been very enjoyably 
spent. 



Now Is The Time To — 

Recuperate from Exams. 
Crack the Winter nuts 
Sharpen those skates 
Challenge Jack Frost 
At 6:00 A. M. 
Grow strong on 
Potatoes, beans and prunes. 
Begin the Winter Term aright. 
Smile awhile ! 



Dr. Herbert Leon Cope 

All who heard Dr. Cope on the 
evening of Nov. 19 will agree that 
he was a splendid nerve tonic. Mar- 
ket House Hall resounded with 
healthy wholesome laughter, and 
its spirit was carried away by all 
who heard him in the days which 
followed. Dr. Cope lectured on 
"The Religion of Laughing." He 
said laughing was a soul quality, 
because man was the first animal to 
possess a soul and the first animal 
to laugh, probably because the 
animals never before had anything 
at which to laugh. "God himself en- 
joys a joke or some of us would 
never have been created." "Laugh- 
ter and tears are governed by the 
same impulse and muscles. An art- 
ist can convert a teary face into one 
of laughter by a single stroke; my 
mother also, although she was no 
artist, had the power to change my 
face from laughter to tears by a 
single stroke." In spite of the light 
jovial manner in which this lecture 
was delivered, there was a serious 
message at the heart of it and Dr. 
Cope gave each of us a new idea 
of the humor and joy in life, a 
greater love and regard for our 
fellowmen, a trust in God, and the 
heart message of appreciation of 
the "melody of Childhood, That's 
upward from the heart." 



Prof. B "What part of speech is 
potential?" 

Mr. Mohr: "Possibility." 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



Play the Game! 

During the latter part of Octo- 
ber baseball was abandoned and 
three vigorous soccer teams were 
organized. They are divided into 
sections A, B and C and are under 
the leaderships of Zendt, Myers and 
Raffensberger respectively. 

The games played thus far were 
intensely interesting and full of 
"pep," and hard kicking was fre- 
quented by some of the heavy 
players Holshopple and Weaver. 

The teams in general displayed 
fine team work, team B having the 
honor of winning every game in 
which it participated with the ex- 
ception of one in which there was 
a tie score. 

At times when the weather did 
not permit soccer playing the boys 
exercised by practicing basket ball 
for the coming season. There are 
bright prospects of having a lively 
basketball season with the organ- 
ization of quite a few teams which 
will keep E. C. humming during the 
winter months. 

Basket ball is quite loud, you tell 
'em, 

Tennis is ditto; 
Soccer is quite interesting, 

But Basket Ball? Let's go! 



Next! 

The farmer told a funny yarn 

I think it was a lie 
He said he bent his cornstalks down 

To let the moon go by. 



He is happy whose circumstances 
suit his temper; but he is more ex- 
cellent who can suit his temper to 
any circumstance. 



The darkest hour in the history 
of any young man is when he sits 
down to study how to get money 
without honestly earning it. 



Humor 



It was the first time little Mary 
had ever seen a peacock. Running 
into the house she cried "O granny, 
come out and see!" "One of your 
chickens is in bloom." 



Don't put off for tomorrow what 
can be done today. 



All the rust of life ought to be 
scoured of by mirth. 

O. W. Holmes 



AH Too True 

Chatter, chatter book room Bill 
How I wish you would keep still. 



Ill deeds are 
evil word. 



doubled with an 
Shakespere. 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Campaign Notes 



From the Field. 

The month of November proved 
to be a busy one for the solicitors. 
After their return from the District 
meeting of Southern Pennsylvania 
a trip was made to the Mechanic 
Grove Congregation in the southern 
part of Lancaster County. Elder 
Rufus Bucher, one of the first stu- 
dents at Elizabethtown College, has 
charge of this congregation. He 
served as pilot in one part of the 
congregation. Brother U. C. Fas- 
nacht piloted Elder I. W. Taylor in 
another part of this church. This 
congregation believes in Christian 
education. A number of its students 
are at present enrolled in the Col- 
lege. The members contributed 152 
per cent, of their quota, with some 
homes to be heard from a little 
later. 

Soliciting was a pleasure in the 
Chiques Congregation. Many grad- 
uates and students of the Col- 
lege have come from this church. 
Hardly a year passes without a num- 
ber of students from this church. 
There are more children in the 
church in this congregation in pro- 
portion to the membership, than in 
any congregation in Eastern and 
Southern Pennsylvania. This church 
is alive in all phases of church work. 
Brethren Geib, Stauffer, Shearer 
and Eshleman served as pilots and 
so planned the work that the entire 
church was solicited in a week. El- 
ders H. B. Yoder, I. W. Taylor, J. G. 
Meyer and Ralph W. Schlosser did 
the soliciting. The congregation 



contributed nearly eleven thousand 
dollars — 110 per cent, of their quo- 
ta. 

From the Chiques church the 
workwas begun in the East Fairview 
Congregation. Elder George Wea- 
ver and Allen Becker directed the 
solicitors in this church. A healthy 
school sentiment prevailed among 
the members of this congregation. 
The quota was reached within a few 
hundred dollars. Elder H. B. Yo- 
der assisted Professor Schlosser in 
this congregation. 

On Monday, November 15, Elder 
John Herr and Professor Schlosser 
started soliciting in the White Oak 
Congregation. They piloted their 
way from home to home in this large 
congregation of four hundred and 
fifty members. The work was plea- 
sant but consumed about two weeks 
on account of working in one team 
only. At the present writing the 
work is not quite completed, but 
the quota will be nearly reached. 
Elder H. B. Yoder also assisted in 
this church. This congregation is 
supporting Brother W. E. Glas- 
mire on the Denmark field. Brother 
Glasmire is a graduate of Elizabeth- 
town College in several courses. This 
church is awakening to the need of 
Christian education for her young 
people. 

Three congregations now remain. 
East Petersburg, West Green Tree, 
and Elizabethtown. By the end of 
the year we are hoping to complete 
our task. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



THE CHRISTIAN COLLEGE. 

Christianity is salt, life, light, and 
it must express itself intentionally 
and powerfully in saving, lifting, 
and enlightening. It is true that 
Christianity can exist without active 
ly engaging in education, just as it 
can exist without actively engaging 
in the missionary propaganda; it 
can exist without the Christian Col- 
lege or the Christian program of 
missions, but unprogressively and 
unfaithfully. 

Christianity needs the Christian 
College to keep pure its deposit of 
truth. Christianity is charged with 
certain definite revelations from 
God. It is charged with the custody 
of the Scriptures, the Christian facts 
— the phophecies, the miracles, and 
the great revelations. Its first obli- 
gation is to preach and preserve the 
gospel of Jesus Christ to all men 
and nations, and to apply and en- 
force the saving, restraining, and 
constraining power of Christ in hu- 
man society. 

It is not a matter of indifference 
whether Christianity keeps true to 
the New Testament. It has no ground 
on which to stand if the Christian 
facts are held lightly and maintain- 
ed feebly. The simplicity toward 
Christ which the Apostle Paul pro- 
tested is the only principle on which 
Christianity can preserve in power 
its message for mankind. The 
Christian College is the educational 
bulwark for a simple and conquer- 
ing faith in the land. 

If it is important to have Chris- 
tianity healthy and vigorous and to 
hold secure that good thing which 
was delivered to it by the Holy Spir- 



it, the Christian College is indispen- 
sable. Out of the College comes 
the Christian leadership — the teach- 
ers, the writers, the thinkers; and 
if the college is secular, doubtful, 
or indifferent, the thought and feel- 
ing of the Christian church will fol- 
low that spirit as night the day. 

If the Christian Colleges were 
withdrawn from the field, the oppor- 
tunity for a college education in this 
country would be almost contempti- 
ble in comparison with the demand 
for it. This fact would be enough 
of itself to exact much more consid- 
eration for the Christian College 
than the leaders of secular educa- 
tion have been accustomed to give, 
— as, for instance, when the presi- 
dent of the Carnegie. Foundation, 
ruling out denominational colleges 
from its benefits, allows with scant 
respect that they have a proper 
place in the machinery of educatino- 
aj propagandism. 

The value of Elizabethtown Col- 
lege to hundreds of young men and 
women in the Church of the Breth- 
ren is beyond estimate. It cannot 
be measured with any dollar rule. 
Neither can you begin to measure in 
terms of dollars, the value of its 
work as demonstrated in the lines 
of its graduates sent out to serve in 
church and state. But while the 
value of such preparation and in- 
spiration may not be estimated and 
in some communities may not be 
much appreciated, it is nevertheless 
a fact that the future of the church 
of the Brethren depends absolutely 
upon the training for service she is 
giving her young people today. The 
strength and efficiency of the future 
church may be measured by the en- 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



thusiasm she is putting into her edu- 
cational work and by the sacrifice 
she is making for it today. The 
church that neglects her colleges is 
blind to her possibilities; is blind 
to her opportunity to serve her Mas- 
ter efficiently. If the Church of the 
Brethren desires to have a future, 
she must educate her young people. 
Properly to plant and nourish a 
Christian College is one of the high- 
est privileges of Christian men and 
women. If blessed is the man who 
plants a tree, then a hundred fold 
more blessed is he that planteth a 
College, for there is no soil so pro- 
ductive as mind, and no seeds so 
fruitful as ideas. He who wishes to 
do the greatest possible good, and 
for the longest possible time, should 
nourish the fountains of learning, 
and help thirsting youths to the wa- 
ter. Beating hearts are better than 
granite monuments. 



The Test 

"But father, it's not wrong." 

"No," said the man slowly, "it's 
not." 

"Then I may go!" exclaimed the 
boy happily. "It will be loads of 
fun!" 

"Son, you are old enough to de- 
cide for yourself, and I won't say 
you may or may not go. I would 
rather leave the decision entirely 
with you." 

"But you don't want me to go?" 
said the boy reluctantly. 

"You've heard my objections, 
but, as you say, it's not wrong, and 
you are to decide for yourself." 

"I wish you would not put it that 
way. I want to go so much ; it will 



be such a jolly crowd and they will 
have a splendid time. Please say 
you think it will be all right." 

"Son, I don't want to preach to 
you, and I don't want to prejudice 
you in your decision, but I want to 
remind you of one thing : This is 
not a question of good or bad ; it is 
a decision between good and best. 
If it was the question of right or 
wrong, I know you wouldn't hesi- 
tate ; in fact, I think there would 
only be a little temptation for you. 
It is in choosing the best that the 
test comes. 

"So many of us are satisfied if we 
just crawl out of the muck of 
wrong, and don't try to climb up to 
the hills of better and best. The 
world, as a rule, is satisfied with 
the merely good. So the sacrifice — 
for in choosing the best we usually 
have to make some sacrifice — seems 
to be unnecessary. But every time 
you have a chance to choose, and 
you choose the best, your character 
grows a little stronger and higher. 
And when you decide that the 
merely good is sufficient, your char- 
acter softens a little. 

"Sometimes men are made 
famous in a moment by the hard 
choice of the best; famous men 
have been ruined by failing to take 
the highest way. The law may make 
you choose the good, but only with 
the help of God can you choose the 
best." 

There was silence in the room for 
a few minutes; then the boy heard 
the shrill whistle of his chum, and 
hurried out to answer it. 

The man sat and wondered; but 
the boy did not go. The Youth's 
Companion. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



27 



Red Letter Events 
November 



1 — And the next day it rained. 
2 — Presidential election, who will 
win? Woman's Suffrage, 
on College Hill. 
3 — A number attended Ministerial 

meeting at Palmyra. 
4 — Nothing to breathe but air. 
5 — One of the first frosts. 
6 — A great day; All day chestnut 
outing, minus the chestnuts, 
at Conewago. 
7 — Communion services. 
8 — Girls play base ball ; great 
game, 6-6. 
9 — Elder S. R. Zug gave a short 
and inspiring chapel talk. 
10 — Some students hear Schuman- 

Heink. 
11 — Armistice Day. 
12— A taste of Winter. B. W. A. 

banquet. 
13 — Founders' Day. E'town 20 

years old. 
14 — Steven's Hill revival services 
begin. Newville Chidren's 
Day service. 
15 — The first snow fall. Mr. Sham- 

berger visits the school. 
16 — Rain, rain, rain. See Rabbits 

in Physical Culture. 
17 — Sunshine on the Hill. 
18 — School Management class and 
soloist testing volume of their 
voices. Prof. J. I. Baugher 
moves to new home. 
19 — Lecture by Herbert Leon Cope, 

Let's laugh ! ! ! 
20 — First meeting of the revived 
Homerians. 



21 — Students attend Stevens Hill re- 
vival, mostly girls. 

22 — Still moving. Prunes for break- 
fast. 

23 — Turkeys go up ten cents a lb. 

24 — Preparation Day. Student 
Exodus. 

25 — Oh. that Thanksgiving dinner! 
Welcome Prof. H. K Ober. 

26 — Boys cleaned their rooms! ! ! 

27 — Not much doing. 

28 — At rest. 

29— New life! College Hill sees 
Japan through Prof. Ober's 
glasses. 

30 — Hail December. 



WANTED. 



More pep — Juniors. 

More room — The boys. 

Longer nights — Night Owls. 

Society Halls — New Societies. 

More ice cream — Students. 

Faster mail trains — most of 'em. 

More social privileges — Dan. 

A seedless peach or a lolly-pop — 
O. M,. the poet. 

A tonic for bashful boys — J. Lot- 
tie. 

Some one to remove the posts 
from the "gym" — Basket ball stars. 

A medicine chest in the library 
for those "coughers." — Harriet M. 
D. 

A good industrious worker to 
rake up the fallen leaves. — Eliza- 
bethtown College. 



28 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Darby Brand Canned Foods Are Quality 
Packed. Packed Exclusively For 

Comly, Flanigen & Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 

118 & 120 So., Delaware Ave., Phi la. 

Ask Your Dealer For Darby Brand 
A Trial will convince 



A. B. DRACE 
PAINTER 

AND 

PAPER HANGER 



S. Market St. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



20LLEGE JEWELRY OF THE BETTER 
SORT 

J. F. APPLE CO. 

MANUFACTURING 
JEWELER 

CLASS PINS & JEWELRY PRIZE CUPS, 

FRATERNITY JEWELRY MEDALS 

120 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 

DR. S. J. HEINDEL & SON 

DENTIST 

Out-of-Town Friday each week 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

HEADQUARTERS FOR MAGAZINES 

Subscriptions and Counter Sales 

Best Display in County 

THE ROOT MAGAZINE AGENCY 

121 W. High Street Elizabethtown, Pa. 



FOR PHOTOGRAPHS 

CALL a BISHOP'S 
New and Modern Studio 

Elizabethtown, Penna. 
We Guarantee All Work 

See us before having your diploma or those pictures framed. 

AMATEUR FINISHING SOLICITED 

EASTMAN LINE OF KODAKS AND FILMS FOR SALE 



>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOGQQOOGOQOQOQOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOQOOQOGOOQOGOOOOOO ( 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



29 



CHAS. B. DIEROLF 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 

Franklin &> Marshall College 

LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 
Offers Liberal Courses in Arts and Sciences 

Campus of 54 acres with ten building 
including Gymnasium and complete Ath- 
letic Field. 

For Catalogue apply to 
HENRY H. APPLE, D.D., LL.D., Pre.. 

* 

GO TO 

HORSTS 

CENTRE SQUARE 

for 

Oyslers, Ice Cream, Confectionery 



GANSMAN'S 

Corner North Queen and Orange Streets 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



Mens 
Reliable Outfitters 

Suits To Order From 
Thirty To Sixty Dollars 



Mfgrs. of Plain Clothing for 39 years 
ONE PRICE — Always the Lowest 



Waterman Fountain Pens 



-AT— 



Ream's Book Store 



Y. M. C. A. BUILDING 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 

H. H. GOOD 

Gentral Meat Market 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 



Bell Phone 31R4 
ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

LANCASTER SANITARY MILK CO. 



PASTURIZED MILK 

AND 
CREAMERY BUTTER 



PURITY ICE CREAM 

North and Frederick Sts. 
BOTH PHONES, LANCASTER, PA. 

CLOTHING FOR THE MAN OR BOY 

Complete line of 

SUITS & OVERCOATS 

Suits made to your measure. Men's 
furnishing a specialty. Best make of Shoes 
of all kinds for Men, Ladies and Children. 

Agent for first-class Laundry 



J. N. OLWEILER 
Near Centre Square Elizabethtown 



30 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



EAT 

GUnzenhaUser's Bread 

Delivered by 

E. C. HEILMAN 

Opposite P. R. R. Station Elizabethtown 

Save Your Money by Bringing Your Shoes 

to 

E. W. MILLER 

DEALER IN SHOE FINE 

All Kinds of 

Old Shoe Repairing Neatly Done 

221 South Market Street 

ELIZABETHTOWN, :-: :-: PENNA. 



LUMBER 

AND 

MILL WORK 



We saw timbers 80 ft. and longer and 
deliver a barn complete in a couple weeks. 



B. F. Hiestand & Sons 



MARIETTA, 



PENNA. 



When In Need Of 

SHOES 

§ WHICH WILL GIVE YOU EXTREMELY LONG WEAR COME TO 

The W. A. Withers Shoe Co. 

OLD MARKET HOUSE BLDG. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Prompt, Careful Attention Given To Mail Orders 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



31 



QUALITY 

LEBANON 

BOLOGNA 

Made in the Most Modern and 

Sanitary Plant 
Manufacturing this Famous Product 



"MORRIS SUPREME" 

FOOD PRODUCTS 

Advertised and known over the 
Entire World 

THE LEBANON BOLOGNA 
and 

PROVISION CO. 

D. B. Buck, Secretary and Mgr. 

H. W. Buck, Distributor 



CLASS PINS AND RINGS 

For Colleges, High Schools, Sunday 
Schools, etc. Illustrated catalog mailed 
upon request. We are also Headquarters 
for Colleges and High School pennants. 
Let us know your wants. 

UNION EMBLEM CO. 
Dept. 89, Palmyra, Pa. 




HWHR 

fouIkImnIpen 



Imade on honor-builtfor service! 

Base Ball and Lawn Tennis Goods 

Foot Ball and Basket Ball Goods 

Sport'ng Goods Of All Kinds 

Books, Stationery and Office 

Supplies 

DUTVVEILERS 

813 Cumberland S'.reet 
LEBANON, :-: :-: PENNA. 



WHATEVER YOU NEED IN 
MERCHANDISE 

ALWAYS GO TO 

GREENBLATT'S DEPT. STORE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 
IT WILL PAY YOU 



JOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXX>00000000000000000( 

DEMY & DETRA 

Dealers in 

FARM IMPLEMENTS AND REPAIRS, HUBER TRACTORS, GASOLINE AND 
OIL ENGINES, HAND AND POWER PUMPS 



REPAIRING A SPECIALTY 



Be1l P p h h o n ne 6 63-R2 ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

)0OO0O0OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO00OO0OO00O0000O00OO0OOOOOOOO0O0000O00< 



32 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Conducted on Sanitary Principles 

is the 

RALPH GROSS 

SHAVING PARLOR 

Agency for Manhattan Laundry 



THE BEST THERE IS IN 

HARDWARE 

At the Lowest Possible Price 
BOGGS' QUALITY HARDWARE STORE 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



LEHMAN & WOLGEMUTH 
COAL 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED and FLOUR 
BOTH 'PHONES ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



JOHN M. SHOOKERS 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 

Repairing a Specialty 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 



Kodaks & Films Stationery 

H. K. DORSHEIMER 

Confections Athletic Goods 



^oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo^ 

PIANOS-VICTROLAS 

Musical Instruments of Every Description 
Our Line Is Complete 



32 Makes of Pianos, 40 Styles 

Victor. Cheney, Star, Franklin and Solotone Phonograph 
Popular Sheet Music 9c a Copy 



CASH OR EASY PAYMENT PLAN 



KIRK JOHNSON & CO. 

16-18 W. King Street LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 

iooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooe 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



33 



GO TO 



GUY The BARBER 

HE'S ON THE SQUARE 

Kwick-Lite, Flashlights 

Kyanize, Floor Finish 



Joseph H. Rider 4 Son 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



FOR GOOD EATS CALL AT 

Hornafiifs' Restaurant 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

OYSTERS IN SEASON 

ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO VISIT 

HIRSH & BR0. 

Centre Square, LANCASTER 

for 

Ready-Made and Made-to-Order 

Clothing tor Men and Boys 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS 



We are one of the largest manufacturers of 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

in the United States 



Strictly One Price To All 

Established in 1854 



KIEFFER & LANDIS 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

Real Estate 

Insurance Collections 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



BOOKS 



BIBLES 



STATIONERY 

Phonographs 



I. A. SHIFFER 



39 S. Market St. 



Elizabethtown 



COLLLGF KILL DAIRY 

PURE MILK AND CREAM 

Delivered Dail^ 

S. G. GRAYBILL 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

H. H. BRANDT 

Dealer in all kinds of 
BUILDING MATERIAL 

SLATE AND 

ROOFING PAPER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



CENTRAL 
MUSIC STORE 



Victrolas, Grafonolas, Records, Stringed 
Instruments, Stationery, Kodaks, Eastman 
Films, Waterman Fountain Pens and 
Greeting cards. 

Films Developed and Primed 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- -:- PENNA. 



34 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



H. C. Schock, President J. E. Longenecker, V. President 

H. N. Nissly, Cashier 

SECURITY PROGRESS 

UNION NATIONAL MOUNT JOY BANK 



MOUNT JOY, 



PENNA. 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus and Profits $264,000.00 

Deposits $1,324,871.00 

An Honor Roll National Bank, Being 421 in Strength in the United States and 

2nd in Lancaster County 

Resources $2,165,000.00 

All Directors Keep in Touch With the Bank's Affairs 

The Bank Board Consists of the Following: 

H. C. Schock Eli F. Grosh I. D. Stehman Christian L. Nissley 

J. E. Longenecker John G. Snyder J. W. Eshleman Johnson B. Keller 

T. M. Breneman Eli G. Reist Samuel B. Nissley S. N. Mumma 

Rohrer Stoner 

WE PAY 4% INTEREST ON CERTIFICATES AND SAVINGS 



SCHMIDT 
BAKERY 



Harrisburg, Pa. 



PRINTING 



For Schools, Colleges, Etc. is our hobby. 
The fact that we have a city equipped 
printing office in a country town, is suf- 
ficient evidence that we can do satis- 
factory work and last but not least, our 
prices are right. At present we are print- 
ing many monthlies for schools thruout 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This book- 
let is the product of our office. If the work 
appeals to you, get our price on your 
publication. 



The BULLETIN 

Jno. E. Schroll, Propr. 

MOUNT JOY, PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



35 



THE WILLEY COMPANY INC. 

Superior Laundry Machinery 



FACTORY COLUMBIA, PENNA. 



OFFICE PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



109 East King Street 




Lancaster, Penna. 



JACOB FISHER 

8 Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
WATCHMAKER & JEWELER 
With you for 40 years that's all 
From 10 to 20 per cent, lower than the 
lowest for the same grade of make. 




Seller's Kitchen Cabinet, the best ser- 
vant in your house. I have just received 
a half car load of above cabinets, which I 
will sell at Special reductions during Octo- 
ber and November. Call and see the Cabi- 
net, and get prices. 



H. S. HOTTENSTEIN, 
R. D. 2 ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



HERSHEY TRUST CO. 

HERSHEY, PENNA. 
Capital, Surplus and Profits $425,000.00 
Resources $3,500,000.00 
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 
M. S. Hershey, President 
W. H. Lebhicker, V. Pres. 
Ezra F. Hershey, V. Pres. 
S. C. Stechon, Treas. 
John A. Landis U. G. Risser, M.D. 

J. B. Leithiser John E. Snyder 

Wm. F. R. Murrie A. W. Stauffer 

Commercial Banking Department 
Saving Department Trust Department 

LARGEST CIRCULATION AND 
ADVERTISING PATRONAGE 

Elizabethtown Chronicle 

Fifty-one Years Old and Still Young 



Garrett, Miller & Co. 



Electrical 
Supplies 



N. E. Cor. Fourth & Orange St«. 
WILMINGTON, -:- -:- DELAWARE 



36 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



OOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC500000* 

Hertzler's Department Store 

N. E. CORNER CENTRE SQUARE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 




Always Ready to Supply Your Needs Satisfactorily in 

DRY GOODS, STAPLE AND FANCY NOTIONS, BEST GROCERIES, FRUITS, 

SWEETMEATS, SHOES, WINDOW SHADES, QUEENSWARE, MEN'S 

WOMEN'S, BOYS' AND GIRL'S CLOTHING, OIL CLOTH, LINO- 

LEUM, CARPETS, RUGS, ETC. 

Goods displayed on three floors and separate carpet store, three doors 
east of Post Office. 

Agents for made to measure clothing — International Tailoring Co. of New 
York. 

We carry full stocks notwithstanding the great difficulty in obtaining 
goods at these high prices. 

Long experience in merchandising goe with prices of goods purchased here. 

HERTZLER BROS. 



>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC( 



COOOOOOO<X}OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXX>OOCXXXXXXXXXXX>000000000 

J. Hoffman Garber Benj. F. Garber 

GARBER GARAGE 



Bell Phone 43R2 

AUTHORIZED 

SALES 

AND 

SERVICE 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 




Ind. Pbone 605A 

GENUINE 

FORD 

PARTS 

ACCESSORIES 



Our Repair Department Is Complete with the Latest Ford Approved Machinery 
Ford Prices Used AH Work Guaranteed 

XXXXX)OOOOOOOOCOOOOOOOOOOOOO , 0000000000000000000000000000 



KLEIN'S 

Milk Chocolate 

Almond Bars 



"The Milkiest Kind of Milk Chocolate" 




OOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOGOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

MUTH BROTHERS 



DEALERS IN 

Coal, flour, Feed and lumber 

Our Special Domino Feed 

We aim to give a square deal that will merit 
your trade and friendship 




Elizabethtown College 

The Homelike School 

Stands For 

HIGHER THINKING 

BETTER LIVING AND GREATER SERVICE 



IMPORTANT! 



High 




Ideals 


JAN. 4-10 BIBLE INSTITUTE 




«„.„!,„«, / A. C. Weiand 
Teachers ( WUbur stover 


Excellent 


JAN. 10-21 


Christian 


SPECIAL TRAINING SCHOOL 


Atmosphere 


fr«««i,«y. D / A. C. Weiand 
Teacher 8 ( EzraPlory 


All Virtues 


JAN. 10, 8 P. M. 


At a Premium 


Dr. Russell ConweM's Great Lecture 
•'ACRES OF DIAMONDS" 



Strong 
Faculty 

Best 
Modern 
Methods 

Low 
Rates 



UPRIGHTNESS AND THOROUGHNESS REQUIRED 



OUR MOTTO 



a 



EDUCATE FOR SERVICE" 

If you are looking for a life-work or calling, if you are eager to be of the 
greatest service possible, don't fail carefully to consider the opportunities for 
service in the teaching profession. The touch of the teacher is eternal. The 
teaching profession is calling loudly for worthy young men and women to 
enter this depleted and yet greatest of professions. Elizabethtown College 
offers courses that prepare teachers for the Public Schools, High Schools, 
Colleges, Commercial High Schools, Business Colleges, Mission Fields, Music 
Fields, Bible and Religious Education. 

A TEACHERS* COLLEGE UNDER CLOSE AND CAREFULL CHRISTIAN 

SUPERVISION. 



ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

JOOOQOQOOOOOQOOOOQOOQCiOOOCHiOQQOOOOOOQQOQGOOOCKK)0(y3QOQ)0000000< 



0<XX>OQOOOQOQOOOOGQQQQOQQQGGC<iZGQQf&QGQQQQQQGGQQGQQQQQQQGQQQQQQ 

o 




Q 



See us for FREE Building Helps— Plans and Estimates 



We Are Manufacturers of 

Doors and Window Frames, Doors and Sash, Mouldings, Dressers, Shutters and 

Blinds, Porch Work and Columns, Screens and Storm Sash, Hotbed 

Sash, Stair Work and Interior Finish 

And Dealers In 

Rough Lumber, Flooring and Ceiling, Fir Porch Flooring, Building Lime, Sand, 

Plaster, White Finish, Hydrated Lime, Brick, Cement, Asbestos, 

Asphalt, and Roll Roofing, Slate, Wall Board 

WE SPECIALIZE IN THE MANUFACTURE OF 

Shipping Cases and Tobacco Shocks 



We solicit your business and aim to give you prompt and satisfactory ser- 
vice on short notice. It is not necessary that v/e build for you in order to 
sell you the material; call to see us or 'phone when in the market for any- 
thing in our line and we shall be only too glad to give you our best service. 

Ask for our suggestions and we will cheerfully help you in planning your 
new buildings or remodeling your old ones. 



ELIZABETHTOWN PLANING MILL 



Bell Phone 3R5 
Independent 646A 



HOFFER BROS., Proprietors 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



8 

qqqQQQQQQQOCQQQQOQQOQQGQQQOQQQQQGQQGQQQQQCQQQQQQQQQQQGGQQQOQQQ 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



W. S. SMITH, President PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MaRTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

ELIZABETHTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL $100,000.00 

SURPLUS & PROFITS 144,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited Interest Paid On Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent 



W. S. Smith 
F. W. Groff 
E. C. Ginder 



DIRECTORS: 

Elmer W. Strickler 
J. S. Risser 
Amos P. Coble 



Peter N. Rutt 
B. L. Geyer 
E. E. Coble 



ELIZABETHTOWN EXCHANGE BANK 



Now Occupies Its New Bank Building 
Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 

Pays Interest on Time Deposits 

OFFICERS 

A. G. HEISEY, President ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier 
I. H. STAUFFER, Asst. Cashier C. A. COBLE, Teller 



A. G. Heisey 
Allen A. Coble 
H. J. Gish 
Jos. G. Heisey 



DIRECTORS 

Henry E. Landis 
Geo. D. Boggs 
E. E. Hernley 



B. H. Greider 
M. K. Forney 
W. A. Withers 
A. C. Fridy 



)oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo< 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



■ 



PLAIN 
CLOTHING 



■ 



i 

i 



WATT & SHAND 



Centre Square 



LANCASTER, PA. 



■ ■ 



GEORGE S. DAUGHERTY CO. 

| N. York-Chicago-Pittsburg 



Quality No. 10 fruits and vege- 
tables in No. 10 tins. 



DODGE BROTHERS MOTOR CARS 

R. H. FORNEY 

GARAGE AND REPAIR SHOP 

On North Market Street 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- -:- PENNA. 

CHAS. B. DIEROLF 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



PATRONIZE 

OUR 

ADVERTISERS 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SINCE THE DAYS OF THE GOLDSMITHS 

t The goldsmiths of olden times, with whom banking had its be- 

\ ginning, undertook only to safeguard money and valuables en- 

\ trusted to their care. 

I Banks have increased their activities since that time until they 

I have become an indipensable factor in the finance and commerce l 

I of all civilized nations. 

\ The modern business man and woman who make full use of 5 

\ their bank looks upon it as an institution dealing in business in- s 

I telligence as well as money and credit. 

\ We invite business men and women to make use of all our fa- l 

I cilities for service. " I 

The Farmers' National Bank 

LITITZ, PENNA. 

\ S. W. Buch, President J. H. Breitigan, Cashier, j 

>ooooocxxxx>oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo< 



KEYSTONE NATIONAL BANK 

MANHEIM, PENNSYLVANIA 

CAPITAL $ 125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS 165,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 1,500,000 

FOUR PER CENT. INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS 
ACCOUNTS LARGE OR SMALL SOLICITED 

OFFICERS 
John B. Shenk, President 
H. M. Beamesderfer, Vice-President H. A. Merkey, Teller 
J. G. Graybill, Cashier Norman Weaver, Clerk 

Clair H. Keen, Asst. Cashier Anna Shollenberger, Clerk 



H. M. Beamesderfer 
John R. Cassel 
Morris B. Ginder 



DIRECTORS 
Jacob G. Hershey 
J. B. Shenk 



R. O. Diehl 
John B. Hossler 
W. W. Moyer 



OUR TRUST DEPARTMENT CAN SERVE YOU AS 

Executor, Administrator, Assignee, Receiver, Guardian 
Agent, Attorney in Fact, Registrar 
OF STOCKS AND BONDS, ETC. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Trimmer's Great 
Bargain Emporium 

On the Square 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



Eiizabethtown Roller Mills 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 
FLOUR, CORN MEAL AND FEED 



J. V. BINKLEY, Propr. 

402-404 South Market St. 

Bell Phone Eiizabethtown, Pa. 



McLaughlin Bros. 
DRAYMEN 



LOCAL, LONG DISTANCE HAULING 
26 Washington Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
BELL PHONE 39-R2 

MARTIN 

READY-MADE AND MADE-TO-ORDER 
MEN'S AND BOYS* 

CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS AND SHOES 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



lOOOOOOOOQOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOGOGQOQOOQOOOOOOOGOOOGGOOOOOOOQS 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MOUNT JOY, PA. 



Thomas J. Brown 
Jacob S. Carmany 
H. H. Myers 
Abraham L. Nissley 



directors: 

Gabriel Moyer 
Jos. B. Hostetter 
B. S. Stauffer 
Jno. W. Newcomer 
Amos N. Musser 



H. Roy Nissley 
Jacob N. Hershey 
E. S. Gerberich 
Henry H. Eby 



Capital $125,000.00 



Surplus & Profits $150,000.00 



officers: 

THOMAS J. BROWN, President J. S. CARMANY, Vice President 

R. FELLENBAUM, Cashier 

4% Paid on Savings Accounts and Time Certificates. Resources $1,600,000 

Sooooooooooooooooooockxhxx^^ 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SOUTH END GROCERY 

FRESH, FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES, CANDIES AND LUNCH GOODS 
"The little store with big business" 

Levi C. Hershey 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



A. W. CAIN 

DRUGGIST 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 

THE BETTER REPAIRING OF THE 

BARNES SHOE SHOP 

WILL GRATIFY YOU 

It's Real Economy 

43 South Market St ELIZABETHTOWN 

NISSLEY'S LUNCH & DINING ROOMS 

David D. Clare, Proprietor 

14-16 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER. PENNA, 



LANCASTER SCHOOL SUPPLY CO. 

L. B. Herr & Son 
Booksellers 

Stationeries 

Printers 

46-48 W. King St. LANCASTER, PA. 

THE GROSS 
CONFECTIONERY 

122 S. Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



BARD-BLANKENMYER CO., Inc. 

plumbingTIieating 

and SHEET METAL WORK 



118 South Queen Street, 



LANCASTER, PA. 



GUNSMITH 



LOCKSMITH 

DOMNITZ BROS. 

If it's a (LOCK) key, we have it 
222^ N. Q. St. LANCASTER, PA. 



A. C. McLANACHAN 
BARBER 

21 E. High St 

Second Door From Post Office 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



BUCH MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



WE BUILD THE FOLLOWING GOODS IN 

THE COLLEGE TOWN 



Wheelbarrows, Corn Shelters, Wood Saws, 
Land Rollers, Pulverizers, Water Troughs 



HENRY L. GISE 



Notary Public, Surveyor and Conveyancer 

Insurance of all Kinds 

Agent for 

State Capital Savings and Loan 

Association 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

J. W. G. Hershey, Pres. 

J. Bitzer Johns, V. Pres. 

Henry R. Gibbel, Sec. & Treas. 



PHONOGRAPHS 

We handle only one make and that is the 



EDISON 



WHY ? 
Call at 



The Lititz Agricultural 

Mutual Fire 

Insurance Company 



Insures against Lightning, Storm and Fire 

Insurance in force $39,000,000 
Issues both Cash and Assessment Policies 



13 EAST MAIN STREET 
LITITZ, PENNA. 



FISHER'S 

8 Centre Square 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



EBY SHOE COMPANY 

Incorporated 
Manufacturers of 

MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S 

FINE WELT AND TURNED 

SHOES 



LITITZ, 



PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO{ 

HEATING and PLUMBING 



Miller Pipeless Furnaces 

and 
Leader Water Systems 



LEO KOB 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



J. W. ZARP088 


CHAS. K. MUSSER 


GENERAL HARDWARE 

Sporting and Housefurnishing 
Goods 


Electrical 
Contractor 

All Kinds of 


ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 


Electrical Supplies and Fixtures 

HOUSE WIRING A SPECIALTY 

• 


POTTS DEPARTMENT STORE 
"EPHRATA'S BIGGEST BEST STORE" 


The Ephrata Review 

$1.50 A YEAR 

Best Job Printing 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 


EBERLY BROTHERS 
SHOES COAL 

Main & State S. State St. 






Ephrata, Pa. 


Chas. S. Yeager, Propr. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOO< 



HIVE 



o 




HIVE 



DEPARTMENT STORE 



OUR CREED 



We believe in the goods we are selling in our ability 
to get results. We believe that honest goods can be sold 
to honest people by honest methods. We believe in work- 
ing, not wasting; in laughing, not crying; in boosting, 
not knocking; and in the pleasure of doing business. We 
believe that a man gets what he goes after; that a cus- 
tomer today is worth two customers tomorrow; and that 
no man is down and out until he has lost faith in himself. 
We believe in courtesy, in kindness, in generosity, in good 
cheer, in friendship, and in honest competition. We be- 
lieve in increasing our business, and that the way to do 
it is to reach for it. 



WE ARE REACHING FOR YOURS 



A. A. ABELE 



ELIZABETHTOWN. 

)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXX>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXX>OeX>OOCXX30000CX30000i 



What Would Happen If? 

The new apartment house were 
finished? 

Miss Eberly couldn't go home ev- 
ery week or every two weeks at 
least? 

E. G. Meyer would forget how to 
laugh? 

Miss Hackman could not hurry? 

Dad would refuse to send the 
money? 

All the restaurants in town would 
be closed? 

Miss Martz Jr., could not tell 
any more stories? 

Some morning the cooks would 
forget to get up? 

There would be no more social 
privileges granted? 

Esther T. would awake some 
morning to find herself grown 
"Tiny." 

Mr. Fasnacht would talk in 
class? 

The sun would rise in the west 
and set in the east? 

Suggestion should lose its 
power? 

The boys should lose their ath- 
letic director? 

The office force would be a minus 
quantity? 

Their were no "Seniors?" 

There would be no Christmas va- 
cation? 

L. L. L., "the handy man," would 
go on a strike? 

Prof. Meyer would not give any 
reference work? 

E. Z. S. O 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 















:'.•• ■"".■'SSj!' 




"if •>'-,. c : ^ ■' = ■ '■-:■-■■-* '^^fc 


L % 


w%S*f+s '■ '••*i 






' VW-VS}"' 




»■•.*' ■ • ■■ ''jX^v^-y-.:-' ■ z--' " • '.•.".".-'■ -'•:*. ,'.. : -^^ 


^ • -. .' * ■■ •/ 


•'••.'•./.'• ."•"" i 






• ,tl*..'. 


' !*- '.'''•' •'-'-^••'•'•^■*-*Vvi 


» -.. - s^p^F^ - ■>■- 


m.-' : '. -jt 


"^ji'ii *.»:"»■" 




• ' -.-■ 


' •¥■'■■'"■« 


■ • ..■ *.?:; :. *■.".'.'■.' * 


c.' '- - :_/^ ■.'■ '. * i"'**"' 1 * '." *••*' " •"••'•' / 


-Vc. •■ • 1 


* **•-.' .•' •• .* • '•'»*> 


yr *. * ? • • • ■ * 


' • *.• ' ■/•■'' . ■■. 


- ."■ ) M.'r T 


••'• .' ■'■'■'"•'■'.'•'■A 


fik/^ '' ""'-' 




■■'.'■■■'•: :- : 'gtf 




-.. ■'. . _ ; 


It 


'••■ :\' •"• •: ■' ■' ". '• • • ■ 


Tut" '••: •••.■■-'.■.'■'"' ;:•••'•'•'•.• "•'. .'-. 




'■ -^p- 


•'.•:•:•'.• ■' . •,.'• . 


•••■v^ 1 '. 


'' '-m-V- 




W^S^T- ■ 


.• ';"*.'>.'•" 


^JT: 




\ 


±Jf .^r 


pl^A 


- ^^jiliiiii 


••'iiii.--' 


??^^^P 


■C.' .' 'i ' -' '." V 








^Wm] 




n M 




( 





EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Jacob S. Harley 

Associate Editor Florence T. Moyer 

Departmental Editor H. H. Nye 

Alumni Editor L. W. Leiter 

Religious News Editor Ezra M. Wenger 

( Emma Ziegler 

School News -\ 

( Stanley Ober 

Business Manager J. Z. Herr 

Circulation Manager E. G. Meyer 

Our College Times is published monthly during the Academic year of Elizabeth- 
town College. 

This paper will have to be discontinued as soon as the time of subscription expires 
as an action of the United States legislature. 

Please renew in time and report any change of address to the business manager. 

Subscription rates one dollar per year; fifteen cents per copy; six subscriptions 
$5.00 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



This is the month and this the 
happy morn, 

Wherein the Son of Heaven's 
Eternal King, 

Of wedded maid and virgin mother 
born, 

Our great redemption from above 
did bring; 

For so the holy sages once did sing, 

That he our deadly forfeit should 
release, 

And with His Father work in a per- 
petual place. 



Then let every heart keep its 

Christmas within, 
Christ's pity for sorrow 
Christ's hatred of sin, 
Christ's care for the weakest 
Christ's courage for Right 
Christ's dread of the darkness 
Christ's love of the light, 
Everywhere, everywhere Christmas 

tonight. 

Phillips Brooks. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



The Bethlehem Babe and Hearts 



"Though Christ a thousand times in 

Bethlehem be born, 
If He's not born in thee, thy soul is 

still forlorn; 
The cross on Golgotha will never 

save thy soul, 
The cross in thine own heart alone 

can make thee whole." 
It is a striking fact that some 
heathen nations although they wor- 
ship false gods and know not the 
Saviour of mankind, yet observe 
some of the Christmas customs of 
Christian lands. But this fact is no 
more striking than what we see 
from year to year in our own Chris- 
tian country — now — Christian peo- 
ple everywhere trying to claim a 
part in the true Christian Christmas 
celebration. The Babe born in 
Bethlehem nearly two thousand 
years ago came as God's greatest 
gift to all mankind. But His pro- 
vision for our full appreciation of 
this Babe as a gift is that He must 
find a place and be born in our own 
hearts. In later years when the 
cross was borne to Calvary's brow 
and the redemption of the world 
was purchased by the blood of this 
Son, God's great gift, there were 
hearts who knew Him and felt His 
atoning power, but there were also 
hearts that knew Him not and could 
not comprehend the meaning of 
that wonderful act of redemption. 

In this beautiful sacred Christ- 
mas season contrast the heart in 
which the Babe of Bethlehem has 
been born, aglow with love and 
peace, with that heart which is 
empty and forlorn. 



May the bells of Heaven ring, 
the lights gleam and shimmer, and 
the morning stars sing anew of 
Glory to God in the Highest, the 
message of Peace and Good will to 
all men, and may they proclaim 
the birth of Christ in the heart of 
all mankind. 



Christmas 

The most cherished and the most 
sacred day of the year is Christ- 
mas Day — the birthday of Jesus 
Christ to whom the whole human 
family owes a sincere and over- 
flowing heart of love. 

The great star of the East should 
be shining forth with all its luster 
and brilliancy in our lives and our 
hearts enraptured with melody that 
bursts forth in strains of music 
"Glory to God in the Highest, and 
Peace on Earth, Good will toward 
men." These words resound in the 
hearts of men and women with 
neverdying endearment. 

Christmas brings forth thoughts 
that wander back through the ages 
and focus on the manger where the 
Babe, is lying wrapped in swad- 
dling clothes — the Babe upon 
whom rested the hope of salvation. 
This Babe and this day will gleam 
throughout the ages and give end- 
less rays of light to the world, as a 
costly gem scintillates through 
the unbroken darkness with its un- 
tarnished luster. 

Christmas Day renews the joys 
of the preceding years with gifts of 
fond memories and cheer and a 
sense of reverence that follows us 
throughout the coming year. 

F. H. B. 






12 



OUH COLLEGE TIMES 



Literary 



What is Christmas? 



Christmas in the Christian world 
is celebrated as the nativity of 
Christ. The time when it originated 
is uncertain, but some writers think 
it probably began during the reign 
of Emperor Commodus, 180-192 A. 
D. It seems altogether logical to 
think that the twenty-fifth of De- 
cember is not the exact date of the 
birth of Christ, for in December 
Palestine is subject to violent rain- 
storms and other unfavorable at- 
mospheric conditions under which 
the shepherds would hardly be 
watching their flocks, as they were 
at the time when according to 
biblical history the holy chiM was 
born. But December twenty-fif.'h 
was a convenient date b°rause J h? 
"Great Norse Yule-feast" was held 
at this time, and other nations held 
similar feasts and festivals which 
symbolized the spirit of Christmas. 
It was also the most impor f ant time 
of the year for the renewal of life 
and the revitalization and activity 
of the powers of nature. 

Christmas has become a uni- 
versal social and religious festival 
for young and old. Christmas is a 
happy time of the year, but it is also 
a serious time. Too often we are 
unmindful of its real meaning. Too 
o^ten we are so busy preparing ma- 
terial gifts that we fail to realize 
the significance of Christmas and 
t^e nature of that great spiritual 
gift which has made us all debtors 
Fow much better the world would 
be, and how much more we would 



enjoy Christmas if we would all 
give with a giving spirit to those 
who are in need, rather than to 
those from whom we expect a re- 
turn. L. B. 

Gifts for the King 

One clear, bright night the 
shepherds of Judea were guarding 
their sheep out on the hillside, 
when suddenly a wonderful glory 
illumined the heavens as the bright- 
ness of day. The shepherds were 
awestricken, and while they gazed 
towards the heavens a wonderful 
vision appeared. The angels of the 
Lord had come to bring them good 
tidings; a Savior had been born in 
Bethlehem. The shepherds arose 
immediately and hastened to the 
town of David to visit the new-born 
King. 

They arrived at Bethlehem; and 
now where should they seek the 
King? Would they find Him in a 
fine palace? No indeed! Here was 
a King whose praises the world 
would sing forever; yet no trumpet 
was heard, nor was there a royal 
heart stirred. Lo ! This was a King 
from heaven, but there was not 
even a room in the common inn — 
only a lowly stall and a manger for 
the Sovereign of the world ! 

It is a sad picture that the won- 
drous King, who gave the world it? 
Christmas morn and came to bless 
and fill the world with happiness, 
should be welcomed by so few. 

After Jesus had been born, the 
wise men from the East came to 
worship the King and to bring Him 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



presents. No doubt from this fact 
originated the custom of giving 
presents at Christmas time. What 
kind of presents do we bring the 
King? The gift. I desire to bring 
is to brighten some dark way or 
help to lift a heavy burden. Al- 
though we may not be able to bring 
royal treasures or gifts of gold, 
still we can point a weary heart to 
Hope's clear star, and awake new 
hope and love. Hearts won to love 
Jesus are precious gifts in His sight. 
The gift our Lord would like to re- 
ceive from us is a life of loyal ser- 
vice, that we may live to give a ray 
of sunshine, a word of cheer, a 
deed of kindness to make a 
shadowed pathway bright. What 
kind of gift do you resolve to bring 
the King this Christmas? One soul 
is worth more than the whole 
world ; therefore if we lead a soul 
to Christ we bring Him a very 
precious gift. S. M. W. 






"As the dead year is clasped by a 

dead December, 
So let your dead sins with your 

dead days lie. 
A new life is yours, and a new hope, 

remember 
We build our own ladders to climb 

to the sky. 
I tell you the future can hold no 

terrors 
For any sad soul while the stars re- 
volve, 
If he but stand firm on the grave 

of his errors, 
And instead of regretting, resolve, 

resolve." 

Ellen Wheeler Wilcox. 



The Spirit of the Christ Child 

It was a cold, stormy evening in 
December. The wind was blowing 
a gale, and to make matters worse, 
the snow was falling thick and fast. 
But in spite of all this the people 
were walking to and fro on the 
streets of a little mining town in the 
hills. But why all this hurrying- 
Christmas was coming, and people 
were doing their Christmas shop- 
ping. 

This was the evening on which 
the "True Blue Society were to 
meet. They were a body of young 
people who had banded together 
for the purpose of helping others. 
Their motto was, "Do unto others 
as you would be done by." Some 
of the members regretted that this 
was the regular night for meeting. 
How much more pleasant it would 
be to sit at home in the big arm 
chair and read that new book or 
play a quiet game with the rest of 
the family; but they must be true 
to the name of their society. The 
place for meeting was at the home 
of their worthy president, Grace 
Leland, and the thought of meeting 
in her home gave them inspiration 
and courage to face any kind of a 
storm. 

The first one to arrive was John 
Barton. Grace answered his knock, 
and exclaimed, "Good for you, 
John ! I was afraid you might be a 
slacker on such a stormy night." 
She took him into the library where 
a log was blazing in the fireplace 
and he already felt repaid for hav- 
ing come ; for what is more cheer- 
ing than to sit by a fireplace, watch 
(Continued on page 19) 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



School Notes, Personals, Humor 



The winter term opened Monday 
December the sixth. This was a 
day that had been giving students 
and teachers a great deal of con- 
cern. Because of the fact that the 
new building was not completed, 
the students rooms were in a 
crowded condition from the begin- 
ning of the fall term and a number 
had applied for entrance for the 
winter term. We were warned to 
expect anything, and we did not 
know whether we would be put on 
ropes and pulleys, hung up in our 
rooms on hooks, get double decker 
beds, sleep on the ledges, or what. 

The day finally came and with it 
an unusually large number of stu- 
dents. What to do with them? In- 
to practically all the rooms were 
put an extra cot, and with it went 
a student. The boys, however, 
could not all be accommodated in 
the dormitory, and, as the friends 
of the College in town were gener- 
ous and offered their homes for the 
use of students, a number of them 
consented to room in town. 

Forty-three new students were 
added to our number and we wel- 
come them to our school. Every- 
body is settled, reasonably com- 
fortable, and working with a will. 
These crowded conditions will no1 
exist long, as there are prospects of 
the new building being finished by 
January tenth. But even with these 
drawbacks, the students are mani- 
festing the spirit of the song en- 
titled," Smile, Smile, Smile." 



Waiter — I beg your pardon, sir. 
Your check doesn't include any- 
thing for the waiter. 

Old Man Grimm — Well why 
should it? I didn't eat one did I? 



Bright Boy — Say, dad, I can do 
something you can't do. 
Father— What is it? 
Bright Boy — Grow. 



Prof. — What is density ? 

Student — I can't define it but I 
can give a good illustration. 

Prof. — The illustration is good; 
sit down. 



We acknowledge with pleasure 
the gift of a twelve volume set of 
Putney's Law Library, a token of 
the continued good-will of Mr. 
James Breitigan, who donates the 
books to the College library. This 
is one of the many evidences of 
loyalty to their alma mater which 
Mr. Breitigan and others who have 
gone out from this school are show- 
ing. An institution is destined to 
flourish as long as it can awaken 
the enthusiasm of those who re- 
ceived their education within its 
walls. Not only are alumni and for- 
mer students encouraging the work 
here, but the unusually large enroll- 
ment at the present time, as well as 
the hearty response to the call for 
endowment from all parts of the 
territory we represent, gives as- 
surance of deepest devotion to the 
ideals for which the College stands. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



On Tuesday evening at 4 :15» 
o'clock our first public game of Bas- 
ket Ball was staged, which proved 
to be a "thriller" from whistle to 
whistle. 

The opposing teams, the Seniors 
and Juniors, were evenly matched. 
The passing and guarding of both 
teams featured, causing a nip and 
tuck from start to finish. 

Myers was the high scorer for his 
aggregation, he being the only 
man who could locate the basket, 
netting three from the field and 
eight from the fifteen-foot mark. 
Zendt led his fellow-classmates by 
tossing four from the field. 

The audience was an unusually 
large one, as all the "seating ac- 
commodations" were occupied and 
even standing room was at a premi- 
um. The spirit of the rooters ran 
high all thru the fray. The score: 

SENIORS 

Field Foul Total 

,Ober, F 

Zendt, F 4 8 

Moyer, C 1 2 

Sherman, G 

Raff 'ger, G .1 4 6 

Weaver, F 



16 



JUNIORS 

Field Foul Total 

Eshleman, F 

Myers, F 3 8 14 

Gingrich, C 

Reber, G 

Harshman, G 



Substitutions: Weaver for Ober. 
Referee, Hoffer. Scorer, Gettel. 
Timekeeper P. Brandt. Time of 
quarters, 10 minutes. 



The school has now been so far 
standardized as to grant the degree 
of A. M. to Miss Eberly, and of A. 
B. to Mr. Bechtel. 



Since the girls' rooms are so full 
some of the girls are using ward- 
robes for bed covers. Miss Whisler 
remarked, "I was lying on the bed 
covered up with the wardrobe." 



Miss F. Martz: "Did you hear 
about what happened the other 
night? Two boys and a girl had to 
stay in the garage all night." 

Miss Gibble: "Who were they?" 
Miss Martz: "Lizzie Ford and 
the Dodge Brothers." 



In laboratory work in Biology, 
while studying the Amoeba Mr. 
Brightbill became excited when he 
found one and said, "Oh, here is a 
big large one. 



Employ thy time well if thou 
meanest to gain leisure, and, since 
thou art not sure of a minute, 
throw not away an hour. 



Mr. Sherman in class meeting. 
"It has been moved and besecond- 
ed." 



14 



Our wish — A Joyous Christmas 
and a Happy New Year. 

E. Z. S. O. 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Departmental Notes 



Department of Biology 

Biology in recent years has be- 
come one of the very popular sub- 
jects in the school curricula. There 
are two reasons which largely ex- 
plain this attitude of keen interest 
on the part of so many students. 

In the first place it is a science 
that has not been extensively de- 
veloped. It is therefore one of the 
newer sciences, yet it is as old as 
.civilization itself. We have always 
been interested in life, seeking to 
explain the many activities of life. 
It however had never in develop- 
ment reached the point where it was 
regarded as deserving a place on a 
school curriculum until about a half 
century ago, or even less. Within 
the past twenty-five years, biology 
as a science has been developing by 
strides and with it all kindred sub- 
jects. We especially see this de- 
velopment in medicine, surgery, 
and dentistry. Students recognize 
it as a subject in which the best ef- 
fort of a life-time is more fully re- 
paid than perhaps in any other sub- 
ject. In the business world young 
men and women are eager for the 
position that offers opportunities 
for promotion. Biology is a science 
which offers such opportunities. 
The field is large and the competi- 
tion is comparatively small for the 
young man or woman who is well 
equipped for careful research 
work. 

The mass of students however 
are not interested in Biology from 
the view-point of an opportunity 



for advancement. Biology is a 
science that is most practical. As 
we review the trend of education 
in the past years we can easily un- 
derstand the situation as we find it 
relative to the interest in Biology. 
There was a time when education 
was regarded almost purely for its 
cultural value. At that time any 
practical science no matter how 
cultural it may have been took a 
secondary position in the curricula. 
Today as the pendulum in educa- 
tional activities is swinging away 
from the purely cultural ideal to 
that of practical value, Biology is 
finding a large place in the cur- 
ricula of our schools and colleges. 
Students are seeking the subjects 
which offer to them present as well 
as remote values. Biology is a sub- 
ject in which there is a very evident 
present practical value as well as a 
remote value. Biology is the science 
of life. We do not know what life 
is, nor shall we know until we know 
God as He is. However we do 
know and understand a great many 
activities and manifestations of life. 
Biology seeks to explain the life 
processes; to study life in action 
and to study it as related to the 
world in which we live. Biology 
seeks to understand the process of 
digestion, of circulation, of con- 
sciousness, of reproduction, of 
growth ; and in understanding these 
great processes we seek to under- 
stand the relation of that life to the 
world in which it lives. Through 
such a study we are better enabled 
to care for these bodies of ours, 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



thereby to maintain a higher de- 
gree of health. Through it we are 
able to prepare better foods, to 
grow larger crops, to check the 
ravages of insects, to battle more 
surely with disease of every type, 
to perform surgery more success- 
fully; in short, to promote health 
and happiness by being better able 
to adjust ourselves to the world in 
which we live and to understand 
health processes and those things-, 
which promote health. 

Bible 

The work in this department is 
going very well. A large percent- 
age of the students are taking one 
or more courses. This adds flavor 
to the work of the whole school. 

There are four courses given in 
which college credit may be ob- 
tained, viz : "Doctrines as Found in 
the Book of Acts;" "Life of Christ," 
"Training the Sunday School 
Teacher," and "College Missions." 
The other courses that are given 
are : "A Survey of Prophetic Litera- 
ture," "Bible Geography," and 
"Missions." Possibly there will be 
still another class organized later 
on. 

No attempt is made at present to 
offer any courses that usually ac- 
company Bible courses. This de- 
partment, at this time merely aims 
to get the student to appreciate 
more fully his Bible so that he will 
get a strong desire to study more of 
the Book later on; also to cause 
the student to see the Greatness of 
the characters as found in the Bi- 
ble, especially that of Jesus, so he 
may learn to know Him and live 
^with Him. 



Home Economics 

"Art for Art's sake" has been 
the literary creed of one school of 
literary men. Each art has always 
had some definite creed or standard. 
With the introduction of Home Eco- 
nomics we find a creed or standard 
of greatest value. This resolves it- 
self into "Art for the sake of Ser- 
vice," and truly there could be no 
art more applicable to the girl than 
that of Home Economics, for in this 
field she finds her true sphere of 
House-keeping and Home-making. 
The Sewing Department numbers 
eighteen. The quality and amount 
of work done in sewing this fall is 
very satisfactory. On Thursday af- 
ternoon, Dec. 16, an exhibit of the 
work was held in the Sewing Room 
in Memorial Hall. 

During the Fall Term a course in 
the study of "The House, House- 
keeping, and Home -making" was 
given. As a slightly unusual fea- 
ture in place of one class recitation 
— a visit was made to the home of 
Mrs. Fryer on Orange St., with the 
purpose of viewing a well planned 
and built home, tastily furnished 
and ornamented. 

"Practical nursing" is taking the 
place of "Household Management" 
this winter term. As a supplement 
to this work Miss Falch of the Red 
Cross Agency comes to College Hill 
once each week, and gives instruc- 
tion and demonstration in Personal 
Hygiene and care of the sick. 

The Home Economics work on 
College Hill is only in its infancy, 
but like true optimists we are en- 
couraged in the aspect that because 
it is so young it will have a chance 
to develop and grow. F. T. M. 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Literary Society Notes 



Homerian Society 

The Homerian Society started its 
work with a will. The first meeting 
was held on the evening of Decem- 
ber twentieth. One feature of this 
program was a discussion on "Edu- 
cation in India," by B. Mary Royer, 
a returned missionary from India 
who is attending our school and is 
a member of the Homerian Society. 
The question, "Resolved that faith- 
ful and constant effort in pursuing 
the study of any subject should be 
as important a factor in determin- 
ing a pupil's grade as any other," 
was debated affirmatively by 
Horace Raffensperger and Laura 
Hershey and negatively by John 
Sherman and Elizabeth Trimmer. 

The program of November twen- 
ty-seventh was a Thanksgiving pro- 
gram. A symposium, "Which is the 
more important as a holiday, 
Christmas, Easter or Thanksgiv- 
ing?" was very ably and interest- 
ingly discussed by Misses Kreider, 
Walker and Hackman. 

On December eleventh, a char- 
acterization program was rendered. 
The main features of this program 
were "Contrasted Soliloquies" by 
Chester Royer and Lois Falken- 
stein ; and a character contest in 
which Hamlet was portrayed by 
Ruby Oellig, and Macbeth by Alvin 
Brightbill. 

Great interest is manifested in 
the work of the society; the mem- 
bers fullfil their duties with spirit 
and enthusiasm. E. Z. 



Penn Literary Society 

The opening of the Winter Term 
brought to us a number of new 
members. Already they seem to be 
entering into the spirit of our so- 
ciety. We welcome them as so 
many more to help us keep up that 
spirit and to work with us toward 
the goal we have set before us. 

On Saturday evening, December 
fourth we rendered our first public- 
program, the big feature of which 
was the "Lecture" by Miss Flavia 
Martz. Her subject was "Econ- 
omy," a subject which, as she said, 
was interesting to all who were in- 
terested in the subject. It was help- 
ful to everyone present, even 
though some may have gotten only 
a good laugh from it. 

Other numbers on the program 
were : Reading by Miss LaRue Hart, 
Vocal Solo, "I Love You,"- by John 
Bechtel, Spelling Match, conducted 
by Mr. Emanuel Withers, Song by 
Girls' Chorus, and a Symposium in 
which splendid arguments were 
presented by the speakers. The 
question for discussion was, Re- 
solved, That the world is most 
largely benefited by the contribu- 
tions of 

1. The Educator — Mr. Bittinger 

2. The Manufacturer — Miss 
Leister. 

3. The Agriculturist — Mr. Lin- 
inger. E. K. Z. 



Many a woman wears an auto- 
mobile veil who does not own a 
car. 



, 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



The Franklin Keystone Society 

The members of the Franklin 
Keystone Society are very proud of 
the progress they are making. 
Twenty persons were admitted at 
the beginning of the Winter Term 
as active members. 

We are trying to reach the goal 
which our motto expresses, "On- 
ward and Upward.' 

On the evening of December 
seventeenth a public program de- 
voted to Christmas was rendered as 
follows: Music, A Christmas Song; 
Essay, Origin and Significance of 
Christmas, Mary Hykes; Select 
Reading, A Christmas Story, Ralph 
Garner ; Christmas Song, Society ; 
Symposium, Which is the Greatest 
Holiday: Thanksgiving, Mary Wol- 
gemuth ; Christmas, Lena Landis; 
Easter, Rudolph Zeigler; Inde- 
pendence Day, Amos Myer; Class 
in General Information on Christ- 
mas, Mary Crouse ; Song, Silent 
Night, Society. A. Z. 



The sole is a good fish for the 
shoemaker, the gold fish for the im- 
pecunious, and the whale for the 
bad boy. 



A clever man thinks he is super- 
ior to the girl. The clever girl does 
not disturb his egotism. 



Many a girl thinks her lover as 
sweet as molasses — and slower, too. 



Wisdom is knowing how ignorant 
we are and keeping the knowledge 
to ourselves. 



The Spirit of the Christ Child 

(Continued from page 13) 
the leaping flames, and hear the 
wood cracking as the fire consumes 
the log? Soon another member 
came, and yet another, until by and 
by, somewhat to the astonishment 
of Grace, they were all there, fif- 
teen in number. This was an im- 
portant evening, for Christmas was 
only several weeks in the future, 
and no plans had yet been made 
for it. 

These young people were not dif- 
ferent from young folks in general. 
They filled the room with their 
laughter. Some were chatting in 
groups ; some who were interested 
in music gathered around the 
piano. But there was business to be 
done, and Grace soon called them 
to order. 

"Now," she said, "You know that 
Christmas is not far off, and that 
we have made no plans for helping 
any one. We all know that in a 
town like ours there is unlimited 
opportunity for service. What shall 
we do to make Christmas happier 
for some one?" 

Margaret, who was always quick 
to suggest, said, "Let's go out sing- 
ing." 

"For shame, Margaret," spoke 
up W^alter, "Is that all you are will- 
ing to do? That is only a trifle, 
which we will do anyway, besides 
doing something more definite." 

Margaret was somewhat taken 
back, but her spirit would not be 
crushed, and quick as a flash she 
suggested another plan. 

"Why could we not have a big 
community Christmas dinner for all 
(Continued on page 21) 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Religious Notes 



Motives of Christian Missions 

The impulse that spurs Christian 
missions on to the "front line" 
against sin is not merely the obedi- 
ence to that last command of 
Christ "go ye." It does not arise 
from a sense of duty, in its broadest 
meaning. It does spring, however, 
from a deep love of the Christ, love 
of our neighbor, and from an ap- 
preciation of the promise of the in- 
valuable future. In short, Christian 
missions gets its greatest impulse 
from those who are made happy 
because they know they are saved. 
Those are the ones who really see 
the needs of humanity and are a 
real blessing to the world. Money 
alone does not convert the world ; 
nor any other one thing or group 
of things, if the name of Christ is 
left out of it. Some of these things 
have a tendency to change condi- 
tions, and to a certain extent for 
the better, but there is no substitute 
for Christ and all that he means in 
any movement for a better world. 

The real motives of Christian 
missions are (1) to propagate 
Christianity, (2) the salvation of 
souls, (3) the nationalization of 
Christianity in the non-Christian 
nations. There are some things that 
must not be confused with the real 
motives; such as, better social con- 
ditions, greater educational fa- 
cilities, greater industrial and com- 
mercial activities. Christianity is 
not merely a moral force. It is this 
and something vastly more — it is a 
spiritual force. All things that are 
for the highest good of mankind 



now and hereafter are all combined 
in the one influence of Christ. 
Therefore if the only motive for 
Christian missions would be the sal- 
vation of individuals and the Chris- 
tianizing of the nations it would 
strike to the bottom of all things 
that are worth while. As Dr. Speer 
puts it, it is "a force which will 
cut down to the roots, which deals 
with life in the name and by the 
power of God, which marches 
straight upon the soul and recon- 
structs character, which saves men 
one by one." Furthermore, our 
Christianity is measured by the con- 
cern we have about the welfare of 
our fellowmen, accepting Christian- 
ity implies accepting. Christian mis- 
sions. If any of us should doubt the 
worth of Christian missions let us 
examine the relation we have with 
Christ. If Christ is so dear to us why 
not then help our less fortunate 
brothers enjoy the same! Finally let 
us not labor simply to gain a few 
more stars for our crowns. We can- 
not earn those. Let us embrace the 
spirit expressed in Franklin's words 
— "Work as if you were to live a 
hundred years, pray as if you were 
to die tomorrow." R. M. 



Smile ! 
If you think you've missed the 

mark use a smile ; 
If your life seems in the dark why 

just smile. 
Don't give up in any fight 
There's a coming day that's bright, 
There's a dawn beyond the night 

if you smile! 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



Religious Notes 

In the recent series of revival 
meetings at Stevens Hill, many of 
the students played a very active 
part in personal work. To them is 
due the credit for the success of the 
efforts. Two souls came to Christ 
and many others were drawn closer 
to Him. 

Over the week-end, Dec. 3 to 5 
Professor J. I. Baugher and I. S. 
Hoffer conducted a Bible Institute 
in the Antietam Congregation at 
Welty's church. 

Over the week-end, Dec. 17 to 19 
Professors I. S. Hoffer and A. C. 
Baugher conducted a similar Insti- 
tute in the Little Swatara Congre- 
gation at the Ziegler House. 

E. W. 



Search others for their virtues 
ourselves for our vices. t 



Our strength grows out of our 
weakness. 



A great man is always willing to 
be little. 



Leave nothing for tomorrow 
which can be done today. 



Do the thing and you shall have 
power. 



Resolve to perform what you 
ought. 



Perform without fail what you 
resolve. 



The Spirit of the Christ Child 

(Continued from page 19) 

the poor children of the town?" 

The rest were almost staggered 
by the proposal. This was just the 
other extreme. 

Grace, who was known for her 
dependableness and good judg- 
ment, came to the rescue. 

"We dare not go beyond our 
means. There is a limit within 
which we must stay. As I see it, 
there is a happy medium that we 
must strike in this matter. For us 
to have a community dinner would 
mean a great deal of expense — 
more than we are able to meet. 
What we now want is a suggestion 
which will strike the middle point 
between these two extremes. 

John Barton now said, "I believe 
I have just the plan you want. The 
other day I found out that there is 
living a few doors below us a poor 
little woman, a dwarf. She is only 
thirty-four inches tall." 

Everyone in the room was all at- 
tention. Here was a new and inter- 
esting situation. 

"She lives in a basement," he 
went on, "in two rooms. However, 
she does not live alone, for she has 
a son, who is also quite small. Her 
husband is dead and there is no one 
to provide for them in their great 
need. Neither one of them is able 
to go out and work, and so they 
must depend on charity for all they 
get." 

"Good! Good!" said Mary, "Here 
we have just the thing. Poor little 
woman ! What can we do to help 
her?" 

"This looks to me as though we 
(Continued on page 27) 



•22 OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



The Week Before Christmas 



(With apologies to C. C. Moore) 

'Twas the week before Christmas, when all over the hill 

Everybody was packing fit to kill. 

The books were all piled on the table with care, 
In hopes that the jitney man soon would be there; 

The students were hurrying heels over head, 

While suit cases and traveling bags lay on the bed. 
And professors in relief and students grown slack, 
Had just settled their brains for a vacation's nap, 

When out on the campus there arose such a clatter, 

I sprang from my work to see what was the matter, 
Away to the window I flew like a flash, 
Tore open the curtains and threw up the sash. 

The sun on the breast of the new-fallen snow 

Gave a lustre of midday to objects below; 

When, what to my searching eyes should appear, 
But a Ford automobile (having served now a year) 

With a trusty good driver, so trusty and sure 

I knew all at once it was Mr. Shaeffer, 

More rapid than eagles his passengers came, 

And he whistled and shouted and called them by name: 

Now, Liskey ; now Hannah ! now, Lottie and Beth ! 

On, Judy! on, Billy! on, Harshman and Beck! 

To the top of the Ford, to the fenders don't fall ! 
Now dash away, dash away, dash away all! 

As dry leaves that before a wild hurricane fly, 

When they meet with an obstacle mount to the sky, 
So up to the Ford the passengers flew, 
With their arms full of packages and suit cases, too. 

And then in a moment I heard on the stairs 

The rushing of feet and noises of tears. 

AS I drew in my head and was turning around, 
Down the avenue went the jitney all with a bound. 

The driver was dressed warm from his head to his toes, 

And his clothes were all frosty with sleet and with snow. 
A bundle of students he had flung on his back 
And he looked like a peddler just opening his pack. 

Their eyes how they twinkled, their dimples how merry! 

Their cheeks were like roses, their noses like cherries; 
Their limbs and their arms were drawn up like a bow, 
And the rocks and stones were right rough from below. 

The stump of a pipe the driver held in his teeth, 

And the students encircled his head like a wreath. 

He had a broad back, but they were somewhat heavy, 
He shook them when he laughed, like a bowl full of jelly. 

He looked chubby and plump, a right jolly old elf; 

And I laughed, when I saw him, in spite of myself. 
A wink of his eye and a twist of his head 
Soon gave me to know they had nothing to dread. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



He spoke not a word, but went straight to the station 
And filled the depot full; then turned with precision, 
And laying his finger aside of his nose, 
And giving a nod, up the stairs they arose. 
They sprang on the cars, the train gave a whistle, 
And away they all flew like the down of a thistle; 

But I heard them exclaim ere, they drove out of sight, 
"Happy Christmas to all, May the New Year be bright." 

E. Z. S. O. 



23 



My Thanksgiving Greeting 

To Family, College, Church and 
Friends : 

Since I cannot send myself to you 
As I so much had longed to do, 
These few words of devotion true 
Shall bear my fullest love to you. 
May this Thanksgiving day of joy 
Be full. And tho no snow employ 
Our eye in glistening whiteness 

bright, 
May fullest gratitude in light 
Of eye and heaving, swelling breast 
To Him be given with keenest zest. 
Of all for us that He has done 
We can not name in word or song. 
For country, home and church and 

school 
Our hearts of gratefulness are full. 
And thus by thought and word and 

deed 
Our praise and thankfulness shall 

lead 
Us all where'er we be to say: 
We thank Thee Father on this day, 
For all thy tender mercies given, 
On land and sea, from earth and 

Heaven. 

H. K. Ober 



Elizabethtown, particularly Prof. 
Ober's Home and School Families 
were gratefully and happily sur- 
prised by his unlooked for arrival 
on Thanksgiving evening. The en- 
tire student body at school marched 
down to his home singing a wel- 
come home. The following morn- 
ing, Friday, Prof. Ober appeared in 
chapel in person and gave a much 
appreciated personal greeting; with 
heart full of gratitude he told brief- 
ly of his experience and his rec- 
ognition of the care of the Heaven- 
ly Father over himself and over his 
entire family. The response of the 
school body proved their apprecia- 
tion of him and their heart welcome 
of him. 



"A bright and blessed Christmas 

Day, 
With echoes of the angel's song, 
And peace that cannot pass away 
And holy gladness, calm and strong, 
And sweet heart carols, flowing 

free, 
This is my Christmas wish for 

thee." 



The above, reached college, If you were busy being right 

Thanksgiving morning, but because You'd find yourself too busy quite, 

school was not in session it was not To criticize your neighbor long 

read in chapel as intended. All Because he's busy being wrong. 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Annual Bible Institute and Training School 



We gladly announce the coming 
Bible Institute at Elizabethtown 
College, beginning Jan. 4 and con- 
tinuing until Jan. 9. This will be a 
period of intensive Bible study and 
will also include lectures on mis- 
sionary and educational topics. We 
encourage all of our friends to at- 
tend the entire session. Ministers, 
Sunday School workers, and every 
devoted Christian should endeavor 
to profit by this opportunity. A 
special Training Conference con- 
tinuing two weeks will follow the 
Bible Institute. 

The regular Bible Institute will 
end on Monday evening, Jan. 10. 
Dr. Russell Conwell of Philadel- 
phia has been secured to give his 
lecture, "Acres of Diamonds." No 
one can afford to miss this chance 
of a lifetime to catch an inspiration 
that can never be lost. 

The regular Bible Institute pro- 
gram will begin at 9 o'clock each 
morning, and at 1 o'clock each af- 
ternoon. Elder A. C. Wieand, presi- 
dent of Bethany Bible School, Chic- 
ago, will give a series of book 
studies and some doctrinal work. 
He was with us before and we know 
that he will have instructive lessons 
for all. On Saturday afternoon Jan. 
8, a special program on Christian 
Education will be given. Some 
noted educator will give an ad- 
dress. Special programs will also be 
rendered on Sunday, Jan. 9. 

Elder Wilbur B. Stover, our first 
missionary to India, who is now on 
his third furlough, will also be wth 



us. His large experience as a 
pioneer and organizer will well fit 
him to give interesting accounts of 
the work on the foreign field. As 
an inspirer of young and old he has 
few peers in the Church of the 
Brethren. Elder H. K. Ober, presi- 
dent of Elizabethtown College, will 
give a series of lessons on Sunday 
School pedagogics and other phases 
of Religious Education. We wish all 
could catch some of the enthusiasm 
we know Professor Ober puts into 
his messages. Elder Ezra Flory, 
Chairman of the General S. S. 
Board, will also be with us on Jan- 
uary 7, 8 and 9. He will lecture on 
Child Training. His scholarship 
well fits him to speak on this theme. 

Monday, January 10, will be 
largely used for the organization 
of the Training School for minis- 
ters. Sunday School workers. 
Daily Vacation Church School 
workers, and pastors. This work is 
primarily designed for these work- 
ers but we encourage all to come 
and enroll for this work of pre- 
paration for service in the Master's 
vineyard. This Conference will con- 
tinue until January 22. 

The charges for the regular Bi- 
ble Institute are fixed so low that 
merely the expenses of the institute 
may be met. Students enrolled at 
college will pay thirty-five cents 
per meal and receive lodging free. 
All others will pay thirty-five cents 
per meal and fifty cents lodging 
per night. Voluntary contributions 
will also be received to renumerate 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



the instructors. There will be some 
lodging facilities at the college dor- 
mitories. Those that can not be ac- 
commodated at the college will be 
lodged in homes in town at the 
same rates. Application for rooms 
should be made early to the presi- 
dent. Those who enroll for the 
Training Conference following the 
regular Institute will be granted 
special rates considering the in- 
struction that will be given. 

May no one regret not having re- 
ceived an inspiration for larger ser- 
vice. We invite all of our frends to 
this promising feast of good things. 
Come and dine. 



Christmas Spirit 

Christmas peace is God's; and he 
must give it himself, with his own 
hand, or we shall never get it. Go 
then to God himself. Thou art his 
child, as Christmas Day declares; 
be not afraid to go unto God thy 
Father Pray to Him ; tell Him what 
thou wantest, say, Father, I am not 
moderate, reasonable, forbearing. 
I fear I cannot keep Christmas 
aright for I have not a peaceful 
Christmas spirit in me ; and I know 
I shall not get it by thinking, and 
reading and understanding; for it 
passes all that and lies far beyond 
it, does peace, in the very essence 
of thine individual unmould, ab- 
solute, external God head nor sin 
or folly of men or devils can even 
alter, but which abideth forever 
what it is, in perfect rest, and per- 
fect power and perfect love. 

O, Father give me thy Christmas 
Peace. Kingsley. 



Our Alumni on Foreign 

Mission Fields 

J. F. Graybill, '07 and wife are 
serving the master in Frusgaton, 
No. 1, Malmo, Sweden. 

Elder W. E. Glasmire, '07, and 
Mrs. Leah M. Glasmire, '08 are lo- 
cated in Villa Pax, Koldby, Den- 
mark. 

B. Mary Royer, '07 has been sta- 
tioned at Dahanu, Thana District, 
India. Miss Royer is now home on 
furlough and it is indeed a privilege 
to have her numbered as a student 
of her Alma Mater. She is com- 
pleting the Pedagogical Course, 
having felt the need, as she has 
said, of filling up and preparing for 
larger service on her missionary 
endeavor. 

Sara G. Replogle, '14 is in Ja- 
lalpor, Surat District, India. 

Nora R. Hollenberg (nee Reber), 
'11, is located with her husband in 
Vada, Thana District, India. 

Chas. W. Shoop, '05, has been 
stationed at Canton, China. 

Henry L. Smith, '09, and wife 
completed their first furlough last 
summer and are now on the field 
again. They represent the Brethren 
in Christ in Sarhassa, Bhogalpur 
India. 

Rev. I. E. Oberholtzer, '06 and 
his wife Elizabeth are located in 
Ping Ting Hsien, Shansi, China. 
Bessie M. Rider, '03, is located at 
the same station. We print below 
a part of her letter to friends in 
Elizabethtown relative to famine 
conditions in China today. 



ft^^x % oUt^jf^^ *i* 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



The following is an extract from 
a letter sent by Bessie Rider to a 
friend in Elizabethtown. Written 
October 19, 1920. 

How I wish you might have been 
able to go with me and learn first 
hand just what famine conditions 
mean. Really, the prevailing condi- 
tions are pitiable in the extreme. 
On the road one meets children 
with baskets on their arms gather- 
ing up leaves and weeds to feed 
their poor undernourished bodies. 
On the river bed I met two little 
tots. I stopped them to see what 
they had in their basket, and they 
even had some sort of weed with 
thorns that they were gathering tc 
eat. I tell you, it made a lump come 
into my throat, so that I could 
scarcely speak or restrain the tears, 
but dropped some money into their 
basket and went on, and of children 
like this there are existing thou- 
sands. In the evening on my re- 
turn home there were a couple lit- 
tle children a number of yards from 
us gathering weeds. We called to 
them, wanting to give them some- 
thing, but they were afraid and 
didn't realize my purpose, so didn't 
come. The people are so distressed 
and the general subject of conversa- 
tion seems to be that they have noth- 
ing to eat and shall have to starve. 
In most of the homes I visited they 
had leaves put up in crocks in some 
sort of manner for winter use. 
Their rations seem to consist large- 
ly of leaves, weeds and chaff and 
some of them only a meal a day at 
that. Really, conditions are simply 
heartrending! And there are so 
many, many thousands just like this 



that it is a stupendous problem to 
know what should be done so that 
the most lives may be saved with 
the means available. Don't know 
yet just how our famine relief com- 
mittee is going to cope with the 
situation this winter, for the 
amount asked from the mission 
board is very inadequate to meet 
the needs of the many thousands of 
people who should be helped over 
the winter. The famine area takes 
in the provinces of Chihli, Shan- 
tung, Honan and Eastern Shansi. 
Not very far to the west of us the 
crops are rather fair, but it is only 
sufficient for their own population 
while the eastern stretch of our 
province is very destitute indeed ; 
and the Ping Ting district is said 
to be the most destitute of any in 
the province. The Government is 
doing some relief work in certain 
sections of the famine stricken dis- 
trict here in Shansi, but there is an 
immense population that will have 
no other means of relief except 
through our Mission. We appreci- 
ate the raise in salary that the Mis- 
sion Board has recently decided to 
grant the missionaries, which is to 
date from last January 1st. This 
will enable us to contribute more 
than we would otherwise have been 
able to do as individuals here on 
the field. If each of us give $100.00, 
which we should be able to do it 
would amount to over $1000 just 
among our band of foreigners here 
at Ping Ting. 



There is no power on earth that 

can neutralize the influence of a 

high, pure, simple and useful life. 

# Booker T. Washington., 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



27 



The Spirit of the Christ Child 

could be of real service," said 
Grace, "but we do not know enough 
about them yet to know what they 
really need." 

"Since that is the case, said Wal- 
ter, "Can't we go there some even- 
ing and sing for them and at the 
same time find out just what they 
need?" 

So it was decided that they 
would go to this home the following 
evening if it stopped snowing, and 
offer to sing a few songs. While 
singing they would observe condi- 
tions and try to get the woman to 
talk about herself. 

The next evening they met and 
went there in a body. Let us fol- 
low them as they go into the room 
which served as kitchen, sitting 
room, and parlor. Over in the one 
corner was a stove which was only 
about half as large as an ordinary 
one. The kitchen cupboard was of 
the same proportions as the stove. 
About the room were small chairs 
like nursury chairs. The table was 
the kind children like in their play 
houses. In fact the appearance of 
the whole room excepting several 
full size rockers for visitors, made 
one think of a playhouse. The room 
was scrupulously clean, but was 
very plain. 

The members of the True Blue 
Society sang a number of songs and 
then began a conversation with the 
little woman. She did not complain 
about her lot, but incidently men- 
tioned some things of which she 
was in need. She was a good Chris- 
tian and manifested a trusting 
spirit, which touched the hearts of 
these young people. 



They went home with Grace af- 
ter leaving the little woman's home 
and discussed the situation. They 
were all enthused with the idea of 
helping her. 

"Now," said Grace, "We must 
plan definitely what to do. We have 
discovered a few things she needs, 
and the rest we can easily guess. 
One thing thatwould probably help 
is coal; another is flour; and pota- 
toes will not come amiss." 

"I know what we can do," said 
Margaret, "Each one of us will be 
responsible for providing her with 
one thing: one of us can attend to 
the supply of coal; another can see 
to the potatoes; and so on. Let's 
give our orders at the store and 
have the merchant deliver the 
various articles; then she will not 
know where they come from. Those 
who do not know what to buy can 
make up a purse, and when we go 
singing on Christmas night, one of 
us will present it to her. 

This plan was approved ; and 
thus it came about that on the day 
before Christmas the little woman's 
home was the stopping place of the 
grocer, the coal man, and several 
errand boys. They left flour, sugar, 
beans, potatoes, nuts, a dressed 
chicken, fruit, coal, and kerosene. 
Then in the evening came the purse 
of money. The little woman's joy 
was complete, and even though the 
members of the True Blue Society 
had tried to cover up their tracks, 
she was a very shrewd little person 
and she knew who had manifested 
the spirit of the Christ Child to- 
ward her; while the Father who 
watches over all received the 
praise. E. Z. 



28 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Darby Brand Canned Foods Are ' Quality 
Packed. Packed Exclusively For 

Comly, Flanigen & Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 

118 & 120 So., Delaware Aye., Phila. 

Ask Your Dealer For Darby Brand 
A Trial will convince 



A. B. DRACE 
PAINTER 

AND 

PAPER HANGER 

S. Market St. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



JOLLEGE JEWELRY OF THE BETTER 
SORT 

J. F. APPLE CO. 

MANUFACTURING 
JEWELER 

CLASS PINS & JEWELRY PRIZE CUPS. 

FRATERNITY JEWELRY MEDALS 

120 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 

DR. S. J. HEINDEL & SON 

DENTIST 

Out-of-Town Friday each week 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

HEADQUARTERS FOR MAGAZINES 

Subscriptions and Counter Sales 

Best Display in County 

THE ROOT MAGAZINE AGENCY 

121 W. High Street Elizabethtown, Pa. 



iOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO( 

FOR PHOTOGRAPHS 

CALL AT BISHOP'S 

New and Modern Studio 

Elizabethtown, Penna. 
We Guarantee All Work i 

See us before having your diploma or those pictures framed. } 

AMATEUR FINISHING SOLICITED I 

EASTMAN LINE OF KODAKS AND FILMS FOR SALE 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



29 



Franklin & Marshall College 

LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 

Offers Liberal Courses in Arts and Sciences 

Campus of 54 acres with ten building 
including Gymnasium and complete Ath- 
letic Field. 

For Catalogue apply to 
HENRY H. APPLE, D.D., LL.D., Pre.. 



GO TO 

HORST'S 

CENTRE SQUARE 

for 

Oysters, Ice Cream, Confectionery 



GANSMAN'S 

Corner North Queen and Orange Streets 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



Mens 
Reliable Outiitters 

Suits To Order From 
Thirty To Sixty Dollars 



Mfgrs. of Plain Clothing for 39 years 
ONE PRICE— Always the Lowest 



Watermen Fountain Pens 

—AT— 

Ream's Book Store 



Y. M. C. A. BUILDING 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 

H. H. GOOD 

Central Meat Market 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 



Bell Phone 31R4 
ELIZABETHTOWN, -:-' PENNA. 

LANCASTER SANITARY MILK CO. 



PASTURIZED MILK 

AND 
CREAMERY BUTTER 



PURITY ICE CREAM 

North and Frederick Sts. 
BOTH PHONES, LANCASTER, PA. 

CLOTHING FOR THE MAN OR BOY 

Complete line of 

SUITS & OVERCOATS 

Suits made to your measure. Men's 
furnishing a specialty. Best make of Shoes 
of all kinds for Men, Ladies and Children. 

Agent for first-class Laundry 



J. N. OLWEILER 
Near Centre Square Elizabethtown 



30 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



EAT 

Gilnzenhaifser's Bread 

Delivered by 

E. C. HEILMAN 

Opposite P. R. R. Station Elizabethtown 
Save Your Money by Bringing Your Shoes 

E. W. MILLER 

DEALER IN SHOE FINE 

All Kinds of 

Old Shoe Repairing Neatly Done 

221 South Market Street 

ELIZABETHTOWN, :-: :-: PENNA. 



LUMBER 

AND 

MILL WORK 



We saw timbers 80 ft. and longer and 
deliver a barn complete in a couple weeks. 



B. F. Hiestand & Sons 



MARIETTA, 



PENNA. 



3OOO0OOO0OOO0OOO0OO0O0O0OOOOOO0O0OOOC 



When In Need Of 

SHOES 

WBICH WILL GIVE YOU EXTREMELY LONG WEAR COME TO 

The W. A. Withers Shoe Co. 

OLD MARKET HOUSE BLDG. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Prompt, Careful Attention Given To Mail Orders 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



31 



QUALITY 

LEBANON 

BOLOGNA 

Made in the Most Modern and 

Sanitary Plant 
Manufacturing this Famous Product 



"MORRIS SUPREME" 

FOOD PRODUCTS 

Advertised and known over the 
Entire World 

THE LEBANON BOLOGNA 
and 

PROVISION CO. 

D. B. Buck, Secretary and Mgr. 

H. W. Buck, Distributor 



CLASS PINS AND RINGS 

For Colleges, High Schools, Sunday 
Schools, etc. Elustrated catalog mailed 
upon request. We are also Headquarters 
for Colleges and High School pennants. 
Let us know your wants. 

UNION EMBLEM CO. 
Dept. 89, Palmyra, Pa. 








Imade on honor-buTltfor service! 



Base Ball and Lawn Tennis Goods- 
Foot Ball and Basket Ball Goods 
Sporting Goods Of AH Kinds 
Books, Stationery and Office 
Supplies 

DUTEWEILER 

813 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, :-: :-: PENNA. 



WHATEVER YOU NEED IN 

MERCHANDISE 

ALWAYS GO TO 

GREENBLATT'S DEPT. STORE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

IT WILL PAY YOU 



oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 

DEMY & DETRA 

Dealers in 

FARM IMPLEMENTS AND REPAIRS, HUBER TRACTORS, GASOLINE AND 
OIL ENGINES, HAND AND POWER PUMPS 



REPAIRING A SPECIALTY 



Bell p h ho n ne 6 w-R2 ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

00000OCXXXX3OO0(X}OOOOOOOO0000OeXX9OO00O00000O00O0O0O0O0000000O 



32 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Conducted on Sanitary Principles 

is the 

RALPH GROSS 

SHAVING PARLOR 

Agency for Manhattan Laundry 



THE BEST THERE IS IN 

HARDWARE 

At the Lowest Possible Price 
BOGGS' QUALITY HARDWARE STORE 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



LEHMAN & WOLGENUTH 

COAL 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED and FLOUR 
BOTH 'PHONES ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



JOHN M. SHOOKERS 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 

Repairing a Specialty 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 



Kodaks & Films Stationery 

H. K. DORSHEIMER 

Confections Athletic Goods 



PIANOS-VICTROLAS 

Musical Instruments of Every Description 
Our Line Is Complete 



32 Makes of Pianos, 40 Styles 

Victor. Cheney, Star, Franklin and Solotone Phonograph 
Popular Sheet Music 9c a Copy 



CASH OR EASY PAYMENT PLAN 



KIRK JOHNSON & CO. 

16-18 W. King Street LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



33 



GO TO 



GUY The BARBER 

HE'S ON THE SQUARE 

Kwick-Lite, Flashlights 

Kyanize, Floor Finish 



Joseph H. Rider & Son 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
FOR GOOD EATS CALL AT 

Hornafiiis' Restaurant 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

OYSTERS IN SEASON 

ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO VISIT 

HIRSH & BR0. 

Centre Square, LANCASTER 

for 

Ready-Made and Made-to-Order 

Clothing tor Men and Boys 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS 



We are one of the largest manufacturers of 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

in the United States 



Strictly One Price To All 

Established in 1854 



KIEFFER & LANDIS 
NOTARY PUBLIC 

Real Estate 

Insurance Collections 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



BOOKS 



BIBLES 



STATIONERY 

Phonographs 



I. A. SHIFFER 



39 S. Market St. 



Elizabethtown 



COLLE.GE, HILL DAIRY 

PURE MILK AND CREAM 

Delivered Daily 

S. G. GRAYBILL 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

H. H. BRANDT 

Dealer in all kinds of 
BUILDING MATERIAL 

SLATE AND 

ROOFING PAPER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



I CENTRAL 
MUSIC STORE 



Victrolas, Grafonolas, Records, Stringed 
Instruments, Stationery, Kodaks, Eastman 
Films, Waterman Fountain Pens and 
Greeting cards. 

Films Developed and Primed 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- ■:- PENNA. 



34 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



H. C. Schock, President J. E. Longenecker, V. President 

H. N. Nissly, Cashier 

SECURITY PROGRESS 

UNION NATIONAL MOUNT JOY BANK 

MOUNT JOY, -:- PENNA. 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus and Profits $264,000.00 

Deposits $1,324,871.00 

An Honor Roll National Bank, Being 421 in Strength in the United States and 

2nd in Lancaster County 

Resources $2,165,000.00 

All Directors Keep in Touch With the Bank's Affairs 

The Bank Board Consists of the Following: 

H. C. Schock Eli F. Grosh I. D. Stehman Christian L. Nissley 

J. E. Longenecker John G. Snyder J. W. Eshleman Johnson B. Keller 

T. M. Breneman Eli G. Reist Samuel B. Nissley S. N. Mumma 

Rohrer Stoner 

WE PAY 4% INTEREST ON CERTIFICATES AND SAVINGS 



SCHMIDT 
BAKERY 



Harrisburg, Pa. 



PRINTING 



For Schools, Colleges, Etc. is our hobby. 
The fact that we have a city equipped 
printing office in a country town, is suf- 
ficient evidence that we can do satis- 
factory work and last but not least, our 
prices are right. At present we are print- 
ing many monthlies for schools thruout 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This book- 
let is the product of our office. If the work 
appeals to you, get our price on your 
publication. 



"The BULLETIN 

Jno. E. Schroll, Propr. 

MOUNT JOY, PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



35 



THE WILLEY COMPANY INC. 

Superior Laundry Machinery 



FACTORY COLUMBIA, PENNA. 



OFFICE PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



109 East King Street 




Lancaster, Penna. 



JACOB FISHER 

8 Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
WATCHMAKER & JEWELER 
With you for 40 years that's all 
From 10 to 20 per cent. lower than the 
lowest for the same grade of make. 




Seller's Kitchen Cabinet, the best ser- 
vant in your house. I have just received 
a half car load of above cabinets, which I 
will sell at Special reductions during Octo- 
ber and November. Call and see the Cabi- 
net, and get prices. 



H. S. HOTTENSTEIN, 
R. D. 2 ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



HERSHEY TRUST CO. 

HERSHEY, PENNA. 
Capital, Surplus and Profits $425,000.00 
Resources $3,500,000.00 
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 
M. S. Hershey, President 
W. H. Lebhicker, V. Pres. 
Ezra F. Hershey, V. Pres. 
S. C. Stechon, Treas. 
John A. Landis U. G. Risser, M.D. 

J. B. Leithiser John E. Snyder 

Wm. F. R. Murrie A. W. Stauffer 

Commercial Banking Department 
Saving Department Trust Department 

LARGEST CIRCULATION AND 
ADVERTISING PATRONAGE 

Elizabethtown Chronicle 

Fifty-one Years Old and Still Young 



Garrett, Miller & Co. 



Electrical 
Supplies 



N. E. Cor. Fourth & Orange St«. 
WILMINGTON, -:- -:- DELAWARE 



36 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOJ 

Hertzler's Department Store 

N. E. CORNER CENTRE SQUARE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 




Always Ready to Supply Your Needs Satisfactorily in 
DRY GOODS, STAPLE AND FANCY NOTIONS, BEST GROCERIES, FRUITS, 
SWEETMEATS, SHOES, WINDOW SHADES, QUEENSWARE, MEN'S 
WOMEN'S, BOYS' AND GIRL'S CLOTHING, OIL CLOTH, LINO- 
LEUM, CARPETS, RUGS, ETC. 

Goods displayed on three floors and separate carpet store, three doors 
east of Post Office. 

Agents for made to measure clothing — International Tailoring Co. of New 
York. 

We carry full stocks notwithstanding the great difficulty in obtaining 
goods at these high prices. 

Long experience in merchandising goe with prices of goods purchased here. 

HERTZLER BROS. 



8 



>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC( 



O00000000000000000000000000000CQ00Q00000O00000009000O00000000O 



8 



J. Hoffman Garber 



Benj. F. Garber 



GARBER GARAGE 



Bell Phone 43R2 

AUTHORIZED 

SALES 

AND 

SERVICE 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 




Ind. Phone 605A 

GENUINE 

FORD 

PARTS 

ACCESSORIES 



Our Repair Department Is Complete with the Latest Ford Approved Machinery 

Ford Prices Used All Work Guaranteed 

3000GQOGQOOOGOOOOOOOOOOOQOOQ<OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOO 



KLEIN'S 
ilk Chocolate 



Almond Bars 

"The Milkiest Kind of Milk Chocolate" 

OOOOOO0O0OOO0OOOOOOOOOOOOOO00OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO0OOO0OOOO 

MUTH BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN 

COAL, FLOUR, FEED AND LUMBER 

Our Special Domino Feed 

We aim to give a square deal that will merit 
your trade and friendship 

ELIZABETHTOWN, 

OOOGOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 




:'OOOOOOOOOOOCKKXX5000CXXKKX>€KKX5000CXKXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX>OCX)OCXX>0| 

Elizabethtown College 

The Homelike School 

Stands For 

HIGHER THINKING 

BETTER LIVING AND GREATER SERVICE 





IMPORTANT! 




High 




Strong 




Ideals 


JAN. 4-10 BIBLE INSTITUTE 

T„o„v, aw / A - c - Weiand 
Teachers { Wilbur Stover 


Faculty 


Excellent 


JAN. 10-21 


Best 


Christian 


SPECIAL TRAINING SCHOOL 


Modern 


Atmosphere 


Teachers < A ' C " Weiand 
leacners| Ezra Flory 


Methods 


All Virtues 


JAN. 10, 8 P. M. 


Low 


At a Premium 


Dr. Russell Conwell's Great Lecture 
"ACRES OF DIAMONDS" 


Rates 


UPRIG 


HTNESS AND THOROUGHNESS REQU 


IRED 



OUR MOTTO 

"EDUCATE FOR SERVICE" 

If you are looking for a life-work or calling, if you are eager to be of the 
greatest service possible, don't fail carefully to consider the opportunities for 
service in the teaching profession. The touch of the teacher is eternal. The 
teaching profession is calling loudly for worthy young men and women to 
enter this depleted and yet greatest of professions. Elizabethtown College 
offers courses that prepare teachers for the Public Schools, High Schools, 
Colleges, Commercial High Schools, Business Colleges, Mission Fields, Music 
Fields, Bible and Religious Education. 

A TEACHERS' COLLEGE UNDER CLOSE AND CAREFULL CHRISTIAN 

SUPERVISION. 



ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



ioo« 






mm 




OQQQQQQQQQQOOGOQGQOQC&QQQQGQOOQGQQQQOGQOGQOQQQQQQQOQQQQQQQOOOQ 



Sunshine or Soot Jfi 
for tfte babies - 




BUILD A HOME OF YOUR OWN 

See us for FREE building helps, 
plans and cost estimates. 



We Are Manufacturers of 

Doors and Window Frames, Doors and Sash, Mouldings, Dressers, Shutters and 

Blinds, Porch Work and Columns, Screens and Storm Sash, Hotbed 

Sash, Stair Work and Interior Finish 

And Dealers In 

Rough Lumber, Flooring and Ceiling, Fir Porch Flooring, Building Lime, Sand, 

Plaster, White Finish, Hydrated Lime, Brick, Cement, Asbestos, 

Asphalt, and Roll Roofing, Slate, Wall Board 

WE SPECIALIZE IN THE MANUFACTURE OF 

Shipping Cases and Tobacco Shooks 



We solicit your business ancl aim to give you prompt and satisfactory ser- 
vice on short notice. It is not necessary that we build for you in order to 
sell you the material; call to see us or 'phone when in the market for any- 
thing in our line and we shall be only too glad to give you our best service. 

Ask for our suggestions and we will cheerfully help you in planning your 
new buildings or remodeling your old ones. 

ELIZABETHTOWN PLANING MILL 

HOFFER BROS., Proprietors 
Bell Phone 3R5 ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

Independent 646A 
<X)QOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO<X$OOOOOOOOOOOOOCKXXKXXXXKX)OOOOOCOCt 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



W. S. SMITH, President PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

ELIZABETHTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL $100,000.00 

SURPLUS & PROFITS 144,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited Interest Paid On Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent 

DIRECTORS: 

W. S. Smith Elmer W. Strickler Peter N. Rutt 

F. W. Groff J. S. Risser B. L. Geyer 

E. C. Ginder Amos P. Coble E. E. Coble 

>C}OO0O00OOOOOOCXXXX3OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO0OOO00OO000O0000000O^ 

>oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo^ 

ELIZABETHTOWN EXCHANGE BANK 



Now Occupies Its New Bank Building 
Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 

Pays Interest on Time Deposits 

OFFICERS 

A. G. HEISEY, President ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier 
I. H. STAUFFER, Asst. Cashier C. A. COBLE, Teller 

DIRECTORS 

A. G. Heisey Hemy E Landis B. H. Greider 

Allen A. Coble ^ ^ _. M. K. Forney 

H. J. Gish Ge0 ' D - BoggS W. A. Withers 

Jos. G. Heisey E - E - Hernl ey A. C. Fridy 

3QOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO< 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



b n ■ n ■ 



PLAIN 
CLOTHING 



WATT & SHAND 



Centre Square 



LANCASTER, PA. 



GEORGE S. DAUGHERTY GO. 

N. York-Chicago-Pittsbunj 



Quality No. 10 fruits and vege- 
tables in No. 10 tins. 



DODGE BROTHERS MOTOR CARS 

R. H. FORNEY 

GARAGE AND REPAIR SHOP 

On North Market Street 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- -:- PENNA. 

Chas. b. dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



PATRONIZE 

OUR 

ADVERTISERS 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SINCE THE DAYS OF THE GOLDSMITHS 

The goldsmiths of olden times, with whom banking had its be- 
ginning, undertook only to safeguard money and valuables en- 
trusted to their care. 

Banks have increased their activities since that time until they 
have become an indipensable factor in the finance and commerce 
of all civilized nations. 

The modern business man and woman who make full use of 
their bank looks upon it as an institution dealing in business in- 
telligence as well as money and credit. 

We invite business men and women to make use of all our fa- 
cilities for service. 

The Farmers' National Bank 

LITITZ, PENNA. 
S. W. Buch, President J. H. Breitigan, Cashier. 



KEYSTONE NATIONAL BANK 

MANHEIM, PENNSYLVANIA 

CAPITAL $ 125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS 165,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 1,500,000 

FOUR PER CENT. INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS 
ACCOUNTS LARGE OR SMALL SOLICITED 

OFFICERS 
John B. Shenk, President 
H. M. Beamesderfer, Vice-President H. A. Merkey, Teller 
J. G. Graybill, Cashier Norman Weaver, Clerk 

Clair H. Keen, Asst. Cashier Anna Shollenberger, Clerk 

DIRECTORS 

HM Beamesderfer Jacob Q Hershey R. O. Diehl 

John R. Cassel John B. Hossler 

Morris B. Ginder J ' Bt bhenk W. W. Moyer 

OUR TRUST DEPARTMENT CAN SERVE YOU AS 

Executor, Administrator, Assignee, Receiver, Guardian 
Agent, Attorney in Fact, Registrar 

OF STOCKS AND BONDS, ETC. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Trimmer's Great 
Bargain Emporium 

On the Square 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



Elizabethtown Roller Mills 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 
FLOUR, CORN MEAL AND FEED 



J. V. BINKLEY, Propr. 

402-404 South Market St. 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Pa. 



McLaughlin Bros. 
DRAYMEN 



LOCAL, LONG DISTANCE HAULING 
26 Washington Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
BELL PHONE 39-R2 

MARTIN 

READY-MADE AND MADE-TO-ORDER 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 

CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS AND SHOES 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MOUNT JOY, PA. 



Thomas J. Brown 
Jacob S. Carmany 
H. H. Myers 
Abraham L. Nissley 



directors: 

Gabriel Moyer 
Jos. B. Hostetter 
B. S. Stauffer 
Jno. W. Newcomer 
Amos N. Musser 



H. Roy Nissley 
Jacob N. Hershey 
E. S. Gerberich 
Henry H. Eby 



Capital . $125,000.00 Surplus & Profits $150,000.00 

officers: 

THOMAS J. BROWN, President J. S. CARMANY, Vice President 

R. FELLENBAUM, Cashier 

4% Paid on Savings Accounts and Time Certificates. Resources $1,600,000 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SOUTH END GROCERY 

FRESH, FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES, CANDIES AND LUNCH GOODS 
"The little store with big buainets" 

Levi C. Hershey 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



A. W. CAIN 

DRUGGIST 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 

THE BETTER REPAIRING OF THE 

BARNES SHOE SHOP 

WILL GRATIFY YOU 

It's Real Economy 

43 South Market St ELIZABETHTOWN 

NISSLEY'S LUNCH & DINING ROOMS 

David D. Clare, Proprietor 

14-16 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER. PENNA, 



LANCASTER SCHOOL SUPPLY CO. 

L. B. Herr & Son 
Booksellers 

Stationeries 

Printers 

46-48 W. King St. LANCASTER, PA. 

THE GROSS 
CONFECTIONERY 

122 S. Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



BARD-BLANKENMYER CO., Inc. 

plumbingTheating 

and SHEET METAL WORK 



118 South Queen Street, 



LANCASTER, PA. 



GUNSMITH 



LOCKSMITH 



DOMNITZ BROS. 

If it's a (LOCK) key, we have it 
232 & N. Q. St. LANCASTER, PA. 



A. C. McLANACHAN 
BARBER 

21 E. High St 

Second Door From Post Office 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



BUCH MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



WE BUILD THE FOLLOWING GOODS IN 

THE COLLEGE TOWN 



Wheelbarrows, Corn Shelters, Wood Saws, 
Land Rollers, Pulverizers, Water Troughs 



HENRY L. GISE 



Notary Public, Surveyor and Conveyancer 

Insurance of all Kinds 

Agent for 

State Capital Savings and Loan 

Association 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



J. W. G. Hershey, Pres. 

J. Bitzer Johns, V. Pres. 

Henry R. Gibbel, Sec. & Treas. 



The Lititz Agricultural 

Mutual Fire 

Insurance Company 



Insures against Lightning, Storm and Fire 

Insurance in force $39,000,000 
Issues both Cash and Assessment Policies 



13 EAST MAIN STREET 
LITITZ, PENNA. 



PHONOGRAPHS 

We handle only one make and that is the 

EDISON £?. v a ? 
FISHER'S 

8 Centre Square 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



EBY SHOE COMPANY 

Incorporated 
Manufacturers of 

MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S 

FINE WELT AND TURNED 

SHOES 



LITITZ, 



PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



»OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOO( 

HEATING and PLUMBING 



Miller Pipeless Furnaces 

and 
Leader Water Systems 



LEO KOB 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



J. W. ZARF088 

GENERAL HARDWARE 

Sporting and Housefurnishing 
Goods 



: ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

POTTS DEPARTMENT STORE 
"EPHRATA'S BIGGEST BEST STORE" 

EBERLY BROTHERS 
SHOES COAL 

Main & State S. State St. 



CHAS. K. MUSSER 



Ephrata, Pa. 



Electrical 
Contractor 

All Kinds of 

Electrical Supplies and Fixtures 

HOUSE WIRING A SPECIALTY 

The Ephrata Review 

$1.50 A YEAR 

Best Job Printing 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



Chas. S. Yeager, Propr. 



.3 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



)OOOOOOCX)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCK)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOe 



HIVE 




HIVE 



DEPARTMENT STORE 



OUR CREED 



We believe in the goods we are selling in our ability 
to get results. We believe that honest goods can be sold 
to honest people by honest methods. We believe in work- 
ing, not wasting; in laughing, not crying; in boosting, 
not knocking; and in the pleasure of doing business. We 
believe that a man gets what he goes after; that a cus- 
tomer today is worth two customers tomorrow; and that 
no man is down and out until he has lost faith in himself. 
We believe in courtesy, in kindness, in generosity, in good 
cheer, in friendship, and in honest competition. We be- 
lieve in increasing our business, and that the way to do 
it is to reach for it. 



WE ARE REACHING FOR YOURS 

A. A. ABELE 

ELIZABETHTOWN. 

OOOOOOOOCX>OOOCX>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOO O OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOg 



Gifts Books 



Everyone reports having had a pleasant vacation and 
these are some of the gifts that were received : 

A Mid Summer Night's Dream Anna Gibble 

Reveries of a Bachelor Vera Hackman 

Oliver Twist . .Laura Hershey 

Wiggling Boys and Giggling Girls Lottie Nies 

How to Play Basket Ball Captain of the girls' team 

The Elizabethan Age Horace Raffensberger 

Quiet Talks on John's Gospel Miss Bonebrake 

Poets of America Oliver Zendt 

Modern Edition of Horace Elizabeth Trmmer 

Soldiers True Rinehart Brothers 

Feeding of Animals Kathryn Moyer 

The Little Minister Ezra Wenger 

How the Other Half Lives Mrs. Via 

The Three Bears Esther Bair 

Sears Roebuck Catalogue Pats 

Miss Billy John Sherman 

Oh, Mary be Careful Mary Henning 

Peg O' My Heart Margaret Oellig 

E. Z. S. O. 



)0OO0OO00OOO0CXXXX3OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO0OOO0OOOOOO0O 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Jacob S. Harley 

Associate Editor Florence T. Moyer 

Departmental Editor H. H. Nye 

Alumni Editor L. W. Leiter 

Religious News Editor Ezra M. Wenger 

( Emma Ziegler 
School News ] 

( Stanley Ober 

Business Manager J. Z. Hen* 

Circulation Manager E. G. Meyer 

Our College Times is published monthly during the Academic year of Elizabeth- 
town College. 

This paper will have to be discontinued as soon as the time of subscription expires 
as an action of the United States legislature. 

Please renew in time and report any change of address to the business manager. 

Subscription rates one dollar per year; fifteen cents per copy; six subscriptions 
$5.00 

Enteted as second-class matter April 19, 909, at the Elizabethtown Postoflice. 



Build a Little Fence 



Build a little fence of trust around 

today ; 
Fill the space with loving work and 

therein stay; 
Look not between the sheltering 

bars upon tomorrow, 
But take whatever comes to thee 

Of joy or sorrow. 



The Flight of Time 

Grow old along with me, 
The best is yet to be, 

The last of life for which the first 
was made. 
Our times are in His hand, 
Who said, 'A whole I planned,' 

Youth sees but half, trust God, 
see all, nor be afraid." 

The passing of another year may 
remind us with regret of the flight 
of time. It is said, "All would live 
long but none would grow old," yet 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



we need not think of time as our 
enemy and like thorough wrestle 
with it. The old man with scythe 
and hour-glass is but one concep- 
tion of time. We can make time 
our confederate and then it will 
play into our hands. Time ripens 
the grain which is renewed in the 
seed it produces. As faith causes 
us to hide the seed in the earth, so 
faith causes us to look to the future 
even in age. After night comes 
morning. 

Youth is a happy time if accom- 
panied by virtue ; yet "youth sees 
but half." Maturity brings the full 
fruitage of joy. So earth-life is but 
a stage of existence, a seed-time. 
Heaven is the consummation. This 
mortal shall put on immortality, 
and death be swallowed up in 
victory. 



New Year Resolutions 

At certain times in our lives, and 
especially as we enter a new year, 
we feel prompted to make resolu- 
tions. Our repeated failures to keep 
these noble resolves and the skepti- 
cism of others in relation to them — 
all this tends to discourage us from 
keeping up the fight. But we can- 
not cease to hope and to plan; and 
these things are not in vain. Aims, 
aspirations, ideals, dreams,, repent- 
ings and new resolves, all must pre- 
cede progress and growth of char- 
acter; all these denote health at 
the core, youthfulness of spirit, an 
energetic heart-throb which, 
backed by persistence, will 
eventually bring the realization of 
our highest wish. Some new year 
we shall make an important resolu- 



tion and shall signalize the year by 
keeping it. Now the magic word, 
"hold fast," may seize us with its 
spell and charm us into a higher 
life. In His name whose grace is 
sufficient our efforts shall be 
crowned. 



Chapel Reverence 

What shall be the ideal toward 
which we strive as well nigh two 
hundred of us, teachers and stu- 
dents, enter the College chapel each 
morning at the sound of the bell? 
It is not a bad time to relax, it is 
true, a fine time for a frolic, all the 
elements for a social. But we can 
do better yet. We might make these 
morning exercises a beautiful 
means of grace; but if we wish to 
experience that, we must begin 
right and we must all co-operate. 
We must enter the rooms with one 
mind and one heart, and tell our- 
selves, "God is here." We will then 
be creating the atmosphere we long 
for, we will be keeping still and so 
God can speak to us. The world 
far away, classroom cares for away 
— a sacred hymn, some words from 
the inspired Scriptures, a prayer 
direct and brief in its appeal — and 
then away to our labors, refreshed 
and revived for our mental effort 
all day, and strengthen for the 
temptation that is sure to come 
before night fall. 



Charity 

There is so much bad in the best 

of us 
And so much good in the worst of us 
That it doesn't behoove any of us 
To talk about the rest of us. 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Literary 



Supervision of Instruction 

There is need for supervision of 
instruction because of the lack of 
efficiency among teachers in service 
and for training teachers in train- 
ing schools. A large number of the 
teachers in public schools lack pro- 
fessional training. In almost every 
locality the teaching force is more 
or less shifting. There may be 
teachers coming in who are new to 
the profession or to the system of 
education in that particular com- 
munity or new to the subjects to be 
taught. Supervision of the right sort 
may increase the efficiency of the 
untrained teacher to a marked de- 
gree. It also harmonizes the work 
of teachers of different degrees of 
efficiency and experience. 

It is most desirable to employ 
teachers who have had thorough 
training before entering the pro- 
fession. To realize this end the 
training school is a necessity. The 
objection is sometimes raised that 
a training school makes teachers 
too formal, that they come into the 
schoolroom with a lot of theory that 
hampers rather than helps them in 
their work. If a trained teacher is 
handicapped in his work in the 
schoolroom, it is from a lack of suf- 
ficient training rather than from too 
much training. His failure is evi- 
dence that the teacher has not been 
in training long enough to make 
methods and principles habitual. 
Consequently his attention is drawn 
more to the proper use of methods 
and devices than to the pupils 
whom he is trying to help. 



It is absurd to think that all the 
accumulated knowledge and ex- 
perience of preceding generations 
should be of no use to the present 
and future generations. From the 
days of Franklin to the present men 
are finding out new uses for elec- 
tricity, but no one thinks of trying 
to rediscover for his own satisfac- 
tion the fundamental truth that 
lightning and electricity are the 
same. So, in the teaching profes- 
sion it is a great advantage to know 
the principles and methods found 
out by others. To go into the school- 
room untrained makes the work dif- 
cult for both teachers and pupils and 
is certainly unfair to the latter. It 
is easier for the teacher in training 
to learn the principles of method 
one by one under the direction of 
an expert teacher than to have to 
grapple with them all at once in a 
difficult teaching situation without 
help. 

It is the first duty of the supervisor 
to have an understanding with the 
teachers who are teaching under 
his supervision. There should be a 
common knowledge of the school 
situation, an agreement as to the 
purpose of education, and the 
methods, devices and technique to 
be used. Perhaps the best way to 
reach this goal is to have the super- 
visor put his ideas into printed form 
so that each teacher may have a 
copy of his own. Otherwise both 
supervisor and teacher may forget 
what was said, and serious trouble 
may arise. The supervisor should go 
over these forms with the teachers 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



after they have studied them by 
themselves so that any difficulties 
or misunderstandings may be 
cleared up. There will also be need 
for regular teachers' meetings and 
for conferences with the teachers 
until there is a thoro understand- 
ing. 

The supervisor should also be 
able to frame the curriculum and to 
work out the minutest details of 
courses of study. Even in places 
where courses of study are mapped 
out by the state it is necessary for 
the supervisor to adjust and organ- 
ize the subject matter to suit the 
needs of the pupils. Since it is the 
first duty of the school to teach the 
pupil to do better those things so- 
cially desirable that the pupil is 
likely to do anyhow, it is important 
for both the supervisr and the 
teacher to know the pupil. The 
supervisor should know the social 
standing of the pupil, his physical 
condition, and his mental ability in 
order to suit the subject matter to 
his needs. 

Not only should the supervisor be 
able to direct the work of teachers 
but he should also be an expert 
teacher himself so that he may 
demonstrate the methods and prin- 
ciples he desires his teachers to 
learn. This also reveals to him the 
difficulties of the teaching situation 
which he could not otherwise rea- 
lize, and thus he becomes more 
sympathetic and more able to help 
the teachers out of their difficulties. 
Demonstration teaching by the 
supervisor or by some other expert 
also affords opportunity for observ- 
ation. It is valuable practice for the 
teacher in training to observe the 



work of one trained in the profes- 
sion. The observer goes thru the 
teaching performance in his own 
mind. He profits by the mistakes 
and good points observed in others 
and is better fitted to go thru the 
actual performance himself. No 
teacher is likely to make a success 
of teaching unless he has previous- 
ly gone thru the teaching perfor- 
mance in his imagination. 

The teacher should also learn to 
follow specific directions. Unless 
he becomes able to do this it is not 
likely that he will ever learn to 
work out plans on his own initia- 
tive. 

Another advantage of the train- 
ing school is that of forming cor- 
rect habits. This is easier- to do than 
to break up bad ones. The super- 
visor may find it very difficult to 
break up bad habits among public 
school teachers. Most of them have 
had some experience in teaching 
with little or no supervision and 
have unconsciously fallen into ruts. 
The supervisor may be able to help, 
but it takes unusual tact, as many 
teachers of that kind would resent 
being corrected. In the training 
school the supervisor has the op- 
portunity of breaking up bad habits 
before they become fixed. 

The teacher must also learn to 
plan and must have an opportunity 
to carry on his work without help 
of any kind from the supervisor. 
His ability or inability to do this, in 
a measure, proves the efficiency of 
the supervisor. B. M. R. 



Know everything of something. 
Know something of everything. 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Page of Recipes 



A Happy Day 

A heart full of thankfulness, 
A thimbleful of care; 
A soul of simple hopefulness, 
An early morning prayer. 

A smile to greet the morning with 
A kind word as the key 
To open the door and greet the day 
Whate'er it brings to thee. 

A patient trust in Providence, 
To sweeten all the way, 
All these combined with thought- 
fullness 
Will make a hppy day. 



How to Preserve a Husband 

Be careful in your selection. Do 
not choose too young. When once 
selected, give your entire thoughts 
to preparation for domestic use. 
Some insist upon keeping them in a 
pickle, others are constantly getting 
them in hot water. This may make 
them sour, hard and sometimes bit- 
ter; even poor varieties may be 
made sweet, tender and good by 
garnishing them with patience, well 
sweetened with love and seasoned 
with kisses. Wrap them in a mantle 
of charity. Keep warm with a 
steady fire of domestic devotion, 
and serve with peaches and cream. 
Thus prepared, they will keep for 
years. 



Girls! Take Notice 

For a good complexion take a lot 
of rouge and plenty of powder and 
bury it three miles from home. 
Walk out every morning to see if 
it is still there. Note results. 



Recipe for a Happy New Year 

Take twelve fine full-grown 
months, see that these are thor- 
oughly free from all old memories 
of bitterness, rancor, hate and 
jealousy; cleanse them completely 
from every clinging spite; pick off 
all specks of pittiness and little- 
ness ; in short, see that these months 
are freed from all the past, have 
them as fresh and clean as when 
they first came from the great 
storehouse of time. 

Cut these months into thirty or 
thirty-one equal parts. This batch 
will keep for just one year. Do not 
attempt to make up the whole 
batch at once (so many persons 
spoil the entire lot in this way) but 
prepare one day at a time, as fol- 
lows: Into each day put 12 parts 
of faith, 11 of patience, 10 of 
courage, 9 of work (some people 
omit this ingredient and so spoil the 
flavor of the rest) 8 of hope, 7 of 
fidelity, 6 of liberality, 5 of kind- 
ness, 4 of rest (leaving this out is 
like leaving the oil out of the salad 
— don't do it), 3 of prayer, 2 of 
meditation and one well selected 
resolution. If you have no con- 
scientious scruples, put in about a 
teaspoonful of good spirits, a dash 
of fun, a pinch of folly, a sprinkling 
of play and a heaping cupful of 
good humor. 

Pour into the whole love add 
libitum and mix with a vim. Cook 
thoroughly in a fervent heat; gar- 
nish with a few smiles and a sprig 
of joy; then serve with quietness, 
unselfishness and cheerfulness, and 
a Happy New Year is a certainty. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



My New Year's Creed 

To work every day as hard as my 
mind and body can stand. 

To play, and to be made to laugh 
That I may work the harder. 

To sing often, weep when I must, 
and sympathize always. 

To render mercy to them that 
suffer. 

To forgive when others repent? 
Yes. And ask to be forgiven. 

To love all that is good in all 
faiths, and all good people of all 
faiths. 

To hate all that is bad in all 
faiths, and pray for the bad people 
of all faiths. 

To view from every angle before 
concluding. 

To pursue my own life of conduct 
and not ape an idea or act. 

To gain by the faults of the past, 
to build for the future, but to live 
ever in the present. 

To live in self-denial, and yet not 
drudge. 

To keep young to my dying day 
by loving children and doing for 
folks. 

To preach more by what I do 
than what I say I will do. 

To curse the existing order of 
Things? No. Help make it better. 

To face duty, not dodge it. 

To breast contrary winds, when 
they come ; not seek shelter. 

To make them serve by the 
proper setting of the sails. 

To love my home. 

To encircle my children with re- 
ligion, knowledge, fun; and be 
their pal. 

To be loyal to my city, my coun- 
try, my world. 

To be glad for birds and flowers. 



To be bigger than myself one day 
ago. 

To be appreciative and show it. 

To hate sin and love righteousness. 

To seek the best in folks. 

To refrain from worry, and live 
by faith. 

To be happy before going to 
heaven. 

To pray daily for myself, and 
for the heathen abroad, and at 
home. 

To read God's Word to man each 
day, to my soul's good. 

To worship with my fellows ev- 
ery Lord's Day. 

To be ready, when God thinks I 
can do better there than here. 

Clarence Miller. 



Personals 



Edward Wenger becoming ex- 
cited : "Oh, was the ice frozen." 



The cold wave brought skating. 
And the skating brought stars, in 
your crown and elsewhere. 



It is nice to learn -skating when 
you have the assistance of two 
ladies as Professors Wenger will 
testify. 



Mr. Reber can explain the word 
Marvel, marvelously well, and he 
can give a concrete example of it. 
Some people are a marvel. 



When Miss Florence Moyer was 
a wee little tot, she says she was al- 
ways wishing the time would soon 
come when she could sit stoop 
shouldered like her grandmother 
and drink all the coffee she wanted. 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Departmental Notes 



Mathematics 

In the November number a short 
discussion was given of the method 
in Elementary Mathematics. There 
it was pointed out that the develop- 
ment of principles and the teaching 
of formulae is reached thru the 
solution of many illustrative ex- 
amples. When we turn to Ad- 
vanced, or College Mathematics, 
the process is somewhat different. 
The number of examples solved is 
far less than in Elementary Mathe- 
matics and their prime purpose is to 
illustrate the principle or formula. 
Formulae and principles are pre- 
sented logically rather than experi- 
mentally. They are demonstrated 
by logical proofs; each step rests 
upon the preceding one, whence it 
derives its authority. Then the ex- 
ample follows as an illustration, 
and not as part of the proof. 

In the second half-year, four 
courses in college mathematics are 
being given. The course in Plane 
Analytic Geometry will extend to 
the end of the Winter term. A 
course in Plane Trigonometry and 
two courses in Higher Algebra ex- 
tend throughout the half-year. One 
of these courses in Algebra is es- 
pecially designed to meet the needs 
of students in the College Com- 
mercial course and considerable 
time is being devoted to the ele- 
mentary phases of the Mathe- 
matical Theory of Investment. 



Toil is the price of excellence. 

He climbs highest who helps an- 
other up. 



History and Social Science 

The Classes in Freshman and 
Sophomore History are carefully 
following the study of Medieval 
Modern European History. The 
method of discussion is mostly used. 
This is based on the text and outside 
readings and that are assigned from 
time to time. The main emphasis of 
study is put upon the causes and 
effects of transpiring events and 
upon the character, ideals and mo- 
tives (?) of the leading persons in- 
volved. A course in History should 
foster in the student's mind a deep 
sense of appreciation of the best 
things of the present which are 
what they are after long periods of 
developments. This is history at its 
best when viewed in this sense. 

The Class in Community Civics 
aims to discuss the practical ques- 
tions of the daily life of the citizen 
as they arise in the elbow-to-elbow 
and mind-to-mind contact with his 
fellows. The older civics em- 
phasized a recital of the principles 
of constitutions and governments in 
a very dry fashion. These facts 
were so dry because they were so 
far beyond the daily experience of 
young people and thus they lost in- 
terest in them. The teacher of to- 
day in his efforts to socialize the 
boys and girls uses every oppor- 
tunity to utilize their daily ex- 
periences rather than to recite mat- 
ters that are far beyond their range 
of vision and experience. In no 
field of work is there greater op- 
portunity for the teacher to accom- 
plish this than in the field of civics 
and in general social science. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



Department of Finance and 

Commerce 

Curricula of Advanced Courses 

This department offers two main 
courses of study, viz., a course pre- 
paring for college. "The Complete 
Commercial Course," and a course 
in college, "The College Com- 
mercial Course," (Equiyalent to 
Junior College Standing). 

This is the first year we are of- 
fering advanced work in business 
and we have now enrolled five stu- 
dents in College Work. 

For students in the grades who 
for some reason or other are not 
able to take a course and prepare 
for college, we offer short courses 
In bookkeeping and in 

Stenography 

Stenography is a fertile field for 
the man who is ambitious, for this 
kind of work leads to great suc- 
cesses by a comparatively short 
road. Nearly every department 
in a modern business corpora- 
tion, nearly every important man 
has stenographers. In his daily 
work, therefore, the competent 
stenographer has the privilege of 
sitting at the elbow of educated and 
highly trained men who are holding 
responsible positions. This is a 
liberal education in itself. The di- 
rect line of advancement for the 
stenographer leads into the position 
of private secretary. 

At the present time the need of 
and the demand for secretaries to 
business men are continually grow- 
ing. It is in the business field that 
the private secretary of the near 



future will find his greatest op- 
portunities for work and advance- 
ment. 

Music 

Some one has beautifully said 
that "Music is the language of the 
soul." If this be true we surely 
ought to make a more careful study 
of this language. 

Too often we study music as a 
mere pastime instead of thinking of 
it as one of the finest of arts. In 
studying good music we have a cer- 
tain refining process going on with- 
in ourselves of which we are un- 
conscious at the time. The piano is 
sometimes called the King of all in- 
struments, not only being a solo in- 
strument but giving a back ground 
to other instruments, as well as to 
the human voice. 

We are planning in the near fu- 
ture to have with us on College Hill, 
Mrs. Mundorf of York, who will 
give a Piano Recital. Mrs. Mundorf 
is a graduate in piano from Pea- 
body Conservatory of Music. Her 
program, I am sure, will be a rare 
musical treat to all music lovers. 
Further announcement of her pro- 
gram will be given later. 



The Joy of the Chase 

A burglar who had entered a 
minister's house at midnight was 
disturbed by the waking of the oc- 
cupant of the room he was in. 
Drawing his knife he said: 

"If you stir you are a dead man! 
I'm hunting for money." 

"Let me get up and strike a 
light," said the minister, and "I'll 
hunt with you." 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Literary Society Notes 



The Franklin Literary Society 

Although the members of the 
Franklin Literary Society have been 
rendering good programs during 
the year nineteen hundred and 
twenty we expect that throughout 
the New Year each member will 
try to do his part for the society 
much better than he did in the Old 
Year. 

Literary Society work is con- 
sidered one of the most important 
phases of college work. It gives one 
the courage to express himself in 
public, and this is a training which 
is greatly needed in all the depart- 
ments of the world today. 

The debate has been one of the 
most important features on the pro- 
grams. The following questions 
have been debated during the fall 
term — : Resolved that 

1. The farmer is of more bene- 
fit to a community than the manu- 
facturer. 

2. The automobile is of more 
value to mankind than the tele- 
phone. 

3. That iron is more useful than 
wood. 

4. Education is of more benefit 
to mankind than money. 

The following persons have de- 
bated these questions: Ada Zug, 
Roy Miller, Sallie Mae Groff, Ira 
Brandt, Russel Clapper, Esther 
Bair, Emerson Moyer, Mary Cronse, 
Ruth Burkholder, Paul MarkLv/, 
Beulah Gibble, Hartman Gish, 
Henry Bucher, Anna Enterlire, 
Oral Hollopeter and Velma Fike. 

A. H. Z. 



Penn Literary Society 

"Did you go to the Daily Vaca- 
tion Bible School?" "O, yes and 
was it not enjoyable to go back just 
for one night to childhood days." 

And so it was. On Saturday even- 
ing, January 15th the Penn Literary 
Society put on a new feature in 
their public program. It was a 
demonstration of the Daily Vaca- 
tion Bible School. Before a large 
audience of students and friends 
the Penn Society assembled as a 
school for the demonstration pro- 
gram. Miss Florence Moyer was the 
leader, while the staff of teachers 
was made up by Misses Laura 
Frantz, Elizabeth Ziegler, Eliza- 
beth Allwein and Mr. Oliver Zendt. 
The school assembled with a hearty 
"Good evening" and then repeated 
the motto "And they helped every- 
one his neighbor, and everyone said 
to his brother "Be of Good Cheer"." 
The main features of the evening 
were Devotional Period, Missionary 
Offering, which amounted to $2.75 
and will be sent for near East Re- 
lief, Scripture memorizing, Habit 
Talk, Music Instruction, Bible Story 
and Epressional Work. The school 
was then dismissed by giving in 
unison the benediction, "The Lord 
watch between me and Thee, while 
we are absent, one from another. 



Four Things 

Four things come not back : 

The spoken word, 

The sped arrow, 

Time past, 

The neglected opportunity. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



The Homerian Literary Society 

The Homerian Literay Society is 
progressing very rapidly. We hope 
our members will get a large 
amount of information as well as 
joy and satisfaction in his work 
for the rest of the year. 

On the evening of December the 
eighteenth a very helpful program 
on the life and works of the poet 
Oliver Wendell Holmes was given. 
This consisted in a sketch of his 
life by Margaret Oellig; A Discus- 
sion of his style and characteristics 
by Lamen Beck. Three of his most 
beautiful poems were recited, "The 
Last Leaf" and "The Boys" by Ar- 
thur Moyer, and "The Chambered 
Nautilus" by Nathan Meyer. 

The program for January the fif- 
teenth was also devoted to some of 
our poets. The most interesting 
feature of this program was the de- 
bate, "Resolved that Tennyson was 
a greater poet than Browning." 
This question was debated affirm- 
atively by Emma Ziegler and Paul 
Zug and negatively by Jessie Oellig 
and Elias Edris. 

The Society feels that her mem- 
bers are being greatly benefited by 
spending their evenings with such 
famous literary men. R. K. O. 



Do it Now 



I expect to pass through this 
world but once. Any good thing 
therefore, that I can do or any 
kindness I can show to any fel- 
low human being let me do it now. 
Let me not defer or neglect it, for 
I shall not pass this way again. 

Stephen Greller. 



Life's Pathway 

The pathway of the year just gone 

leads backward, and I stand 
To catch a glimpse of flowers or 

weeds strown by my passing 

hand. 
A little pathway lies ahead 
God giveth me anew the chance 
To thought seeds cast about, 
To drink his wine of dew, 
And help the garden fields of 
Earth give sweetest blooms that 

blow, 
But how have I fulfilled the 
Task he gave a year ago? 

We pass but once along the road ; 

We go not back to till 

What I did cast along the way 

My mission to fulfil; 

And what am I that every time 

God gives the new year's round 

He gives me still another one? 

God grant that there be found 

No empty spaces on my path 

Where flowers should bud and blow 

Along this opening year of mine 

He willeth to bestow, 

But that beneath his guiding hand 

My golden path may lie 

All weeded and wreathed 

Round in blooms, 

Where I this year pass by. 



The Night Has a Thousand Eyes 

The night has a thousand eyes, 

The day has but one, 
Yet the light of the whole world 
dies 
With the dying sun. 

The mind has a thousand eyes, 

And the heart but one, 
Yet the light of a whole life dies 

When its love is done. 

Francis W. Bourdillon. 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Religious Notes 



Echoes of the Bible Institute 

The Bible Institute which was 
held at the College from January 
4, 1921 to January 10, 1921 was 
surely a mountain-top experience 
thruout. We were fortunate in hav- 
ing for speakers the three men, A. 
C. Wieand, Ezra Flory and Wilbur 
Stover who are each devoted to a 
certain line of work, and who have 
studied their respective fields thor- 
oughly. Then, too, Miss B. Mary 
Royer, a returned missionary from 
India, who is a student at Elizabeth- 
town College this year, related to us 
many of the experiences she had 
while in India. Our President, Pro- 
fessor Ober, gave excellent hints on 
Sunday School pedagogy, which no 
Sunday School worker should have 
missed, for they were rich and 
practical. 

Bro. A. C. Wieand, President of 
the Bethany Bible School at 
Chicago, is one of the foremost in- 
terpreters of the Bible in our 
brotherhood. His lesson dealt with 
parts of Matthew's Gospel, Paul's 
life and works, and the ordinances. 
In one of his first talks he gave the 
the fundamental laws of spiritual 
life. These five laws which Bro. 
Wieand gave are sincerity, know- 
ledge, faith, repentance and bap- 
tism, which in itself signifies 
obedience. The lectures which he 
gave on the Gospel of Matthew 
were exceedingly helpful; especial- 
ly as he showed the conditions un- 
der which Jesus taught the people 
by parables and sermons and also 
the applications which He made. 
According to Bro. Wieand, Mat- 



thew is the greatest book in the 
world because in it is bound up the 
whole Christian doctrine, while 
Mark consists more or less of a 
string of stories. Luke is a biog- 
raphy of Jesus, and John gives the 
arguments to prove that Jesus is 
divine. So we see that Matthew con- 
tains practically all that is given in 
Mark, Luke and John, and can be 
rightfully called the "Life and Ser- 
mons" of Jesus. One of the most in- 
teresting talks that Bro. Wieand 
gave us on the ordinances was 
about the prayer veil. He said that 
the prayer veil is an ordinance 
which is closely related to prayer. 
By this we mean getting a message 
from God, or sending a message to 
God. The covering then is the out- 
ward ceremonial sign which helps 
us to prepare for coming into the 
very presence of God. Thus we see 
that it is an outgrowth of com- 
munion with God. In comparing it 
with other ordinances, we find that 
it seems to be the most essential of 
all because it refers to worship. 
Comparing it with feet-washing we 
could easily see that if feet-washing 
is important, the ordinance of wear- 
ing the prayer veil is even more im- 
portant. It deals with that which is 
even greater than service — wor- 
ship. On closely examining the 
Scriptures dealing with the prayer 
veil we find that there are just as 
many requirements for a man to 
live up to as for a woman. The rea- 
son that we usually consider it as a 
one-sided ordinance is because the 
requirements for the men are 
parallel to the present day customs, 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



while, on the other hand, those for 
the women are not; and on account 
of this we have not as a whole 
thought of the ordinances regard- 
ing the covering as referring to the 
men's side of the question at all. 
First of all the prayer veil shows the 
difference between man and woman 
and is really based on this difference. 
Usually, when we read the scrip- 
ture which says that man is head of 
the woman we feel that it means 
that he is superior to her. This is 
not a fact, for in God's plan man 
cannot be more important than 
woman because both are the more 
important in their own respective 
places. Thus we find the distinction 
to be of work rather than one of 
quality, and moreover the prayer 
veil is the symbolism of this differ- 
ence. 

Brother Ezra Flory, Secretary of 
the Sunday School Board, certain- 
ly spared no pains in giving us the 
full benefit of his study and ex- 
perience along the line of child- 
training. He is probably the best 
authority on this subject in our 
church, and his talks were surely 
very interesting. With his lectures 
he showed a large number of charts 
thru which he conveyed very vivid- 
ly many facts regarding the effect 
of happenings and emotions and in- 
fluences in a child's life during the 
years from infancy to adolescence. 
According to his teaching we can 
scarcely realize the number of fac- 
tors in a child's life which help to 
mould the character and ideals of 
the adult. He discussed them in de- 
tail. The worst thing a parent can 
do for a child is to make it act like 
a grown person, when it ought to be 



guided by its own intuitions. Es- 
pecially is this true relative to the 
imagination of children and to the 
games they play. Besides discuss- 
ing child education, Bro. Flory 
spoke on religious education. The 
main difference today is that we 
don't know how to give real 
definite religious education. Even 
though there are one hundred-fifty 
denominational schools beyond the 
Mississippi, Bible instruction is 
quite limited. Mathematically it 
generally consists of about eleven 
hundred hours, which is completed 
during the teen ages. A course of 
th« same number of hours in Bible 
education taken at the rate of twen- 
ty-five hours a year which is the 
average, could not be finished before 
the student has reached the age of 
fifty. Since the home is responsible 
for practically nine-tenths of re- 
ligious education, we can easily see 
that is the child's divine right to be 
born and raised in a Christian 
home. 

Bro. Wilbur Stover, who is home 
on a furlough from India, came 
here and surely gave us a vivid pic- 
ture of India and her people. Bro. 
Stover has been a missionary to 
India for twenty-six or twenty-seven 
years, and so he is an authority on 
the subject. In speaking of the 
average education and condition of 
the people of India he said that 
three-fifths are illiterate and the 
greater number of the natives are 
in the lower castes, while the higher 
class have smaller quantity. Thru 
missionaries they have now twelve 
or thirteen mission schools and 
about five or six hundred Christians 
in the vicinity of his station. There 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



is a spirit of religion in the Indian 
which is worth fostering. In regard 
to worship we have misunderstood 
the attitude of the natives. They 
regard an idol as something visible 
which represents that power which 
they cannot see. They never per- 
sonify God and they always refer 
to him as "it." There are many 
customs in India which are amusing 
and interesting. One of the customs 
which Bro. Stover related was quite 
amusing. He saw a married woman 
wear an imprinted piece of brass 
around her throat so that her hus- 
band's first wife, who had died 
would not be offended. The short- 
est wedding ceremony that he 
witnessed consisted of the bride 
and bridegroom taking hold of the 
opposite ends of a straw and pul- 
ling. When the straw broke they 
were married. Many other heathen 
customs are practiced and when we 
realize that they think sin is mis- 
fortune we can easily see the 
urgent need of missionaries. He 
gave to us a good view of what the 
church ought to be. He said, "The 
New Testament is a missionary 
book and because of this fact the 
first work of the church is preach- 
ing the Gospel. On this account no 
church can be a success unless the 
missionary idea is her biggest in- 
terest." He then brought affairs 
nearer home and said that every 
person who enjoys a true Christian 
life does believe in missions both 
foreign and at home. A. B. 



Watch opportunities. 



One today is worth two to-mor- 
rows. 



The Training School 

There are folks who feel the need 
of more training so they may be 
able to put the most into their re- 
ligious work, and get the most out 
of it for God. A Training School 
such as has followed up the regular 
Bible Term at Elizabethtown Col- 
lege is a good opportunity for meet- 
ing that need. Similar Training 
Schools are held at the other Breth- 
ren schools. Ours continued for two 
weeks this year and was for the 
benefit of ministers, Sunday school 
teachers, leaders and teachers of 
Daily Vacation Bible Schools, or, 
in short, all live, active Christian 
workers. , 

The teachers in this school were 
persons of large experience and 
were threfore able to give a solution 
to most of the problems folks 
brought to them. Besides the three 
regular instructors were Prof. H. 
K. Ober and Miss Elizabeth Myer, 
who had charge of some of the 
classes during the day. 

Bro. Virgil C. Finnell, whose 
home is in Elgin, 111., has visited 
many of our churches, and he 
brought to us, directly from the 
field facts concerning Sunday 
school and church work all over 
our country. He explained why, at 
some places the work is progressing 
rapidly, and at others it is prac- 
tically standing still, or else dying 
by degrees. Folks need to be 
awakened, and made to see condi- 
tions as they really are. Bro. Fin- 
nell's illustrated lecture, "The Big 
Brown God and His Little White 
Imps," in other words the cigarette, 
has impressed facts concerning this 
great evil, which is all over the 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



country, so indelibly upon the 
hearts and minds of those who 
heard and saw it, that they can 
never be forgotten. 

Bro. Ezra Flory of Elgin, 111., 
gave instruction especially valu- 
able for Sunday school teachers, 
and other workers. His talks were 
all so very practical. His teaching 
was mostly along the line of Sunday 
school work, organization and man- 
agement of the Sunday school, the 
teacher, the pupil and other sub- 
jects. He understands child life so 
thoroughly that anyone even com- 
ing in contact with him cannot help 
but have a better understanding of 
the children who come under their 
care, be it in school, the home, or 
the Sunday School. 

Miss Elsie Shickle of Daleville, 
Va., used most of her periods in dis- 
cussing the Daily Vacation Bible 
Schools, its organization, methods 
of conducting, teaching, and giving 
reasons why we should have them. 
In short she gave us the why, what, 
how and when of the Daily Vaca- 
tion Bible School. Miss Shickle has 
for several years been engaged in 
work of this kind, teaching in the 
schools, directing them generally, 
and helping to train the workers. 
While her talks were given with the 
Daily Vacation School in first mind, 
many of the things she said apply 
equally well to the Sunday school. 
From her experience in this work 
she brought many suggestions to us 
which have been tried out and 
which are practical. 

The whole Training School has 
made us who were present feel that 
there is a great deal of work which 



must be done and must be done 
now. We feel sure that folks who 
attended this school will go back 
to their home churches, full of in- 
spiration and enthusiasm, with a 
determination to do things. As Wil- 
liam Carey did, they will "Expect 
great things from God ; attempt 
great things for God." E. K. Z. 



Personals 



Prof. H. H. Nye was in West Vir- 
ginia during the Christmas vaca- 
tion, conducting a ten-day Bible In- 
stitute. 

Prof. J. I. Baugher conducted a 
series of revival meetings in the 
Back Creek Congregation, Green- 
castle, Pa. Eleven stood for Christ. 

On December 17-19 Prof. J. G. 
Meyer and Prof. L. W. Leiter held 
a Bible Institute at Bareville, Pa. 
They reported a very good meeting. 

President H. K. Ober spent part 
of his Christmas in Indiana and 
Ohio giving lectures and assisting 
in Bible Institutes. 

On Jan. 19 President Ober left 
for Daleville, Va., to assist in the 
Bible Term at Daleville College. 

The College chapel has been 
furnished with six dozen new 
hymnals for the convenience of the 
worshipers on College Hill. We 
tender our heartiest thanks to Mr. 
W. A. Withers who was pleased to 
make this beautiful and serviceable 
gift to the institution. 

On the first Saturday in January 
Professor Meyer spoke on "The 
Joy of Teaching" before the Town- 
ship Institute of Teachers at Mount 
Joy. 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Athletics 

On the evening of Dec. 21, (last 
year, of course) the Boarding Five 
clashed with the Big Five repre- 
senting the Day Students. These 
teams were evenly matched and the 
game proved to be a neck to neck 
tussle from start to finish. The 
snappy passing and close guarding 
of both teams featured. The final 
score was 17-16 favoring the Board- 
ing Five. 

On Friday evening, January 14, 
the Seniors and Juniors met for the 
second time this season. Both the 
players and the rooters entered the 
game with spirits running high. 
From the initial whistle the contest 
proved to be one of the fastest yet 
seen. During the first ten minutes 
of play the Seniors were leading by 
the score 9-2. From then on both 
teams played a tighter brand of 
ball. At half time the score was 
13-10 in favor of the Seniors. A 
sudden spurt in the second period 
of play enabled the Juniors to finish 
with the long end of the score 23- 
18. The score: 

Seniors Field Foul Total 

Ober, forward 4 8 

Zendt, forward 2 1 5 

Moyer, center 1 2 

Sherman, guard 

Raff ensperger, guard . .0 1 1 

Weaver, guard 1 2 

Total 18 
Juniors 

Myers, forward 5 3 13 

Longenecker, forward. 1 2 

Eshleman, center 3 6 

Reber, guard 1 2 

Harshman, guard .... 

Total 23 



The Practice of English 

The teacher of English too often 
experiences that his suggestions, 
while assented to in the classroom, 
are neglected in practice. While he 
is striving to train the members of 
his class in directness and grace of 
expression he notices that in their 
conversation with one another they 
revert to their habitual inelegant 
and vulgar words and phrases. Con- 
sciously they use one speech, uncon- 
sciously another. They have not yet 
learned the moral lesson that the 
practical thing, the proper thing is 
to exercise some degree of restraint 
even in speaking with one's most in- 
timate friends. Nor shall the teach- 
er succeed in bettering the situation 
if he does not show that the appeal 
he is making has something, yea 
much, to do with character. Care- 
fulness and taste in utterance must 
become in truth a part of the stu- 
dent's religion. Otherwise he will 
hardly have the courage and in- 
itiative to speak a language better 
than that used by those with whom 
it is his lot to associate on the street 
and in the home. 



The Lazy Worm 

Two miners who recently went 
on a fishing expedition were 
novices at the game. 

"How are ye gettin' on, Jack?" 
asked one. 

"Oh, simply rotten!" was the 
reply. 

"I don't believe my bloomin' 
worms tryin'." 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



Free Will 

When we think of a King, Father 
or Master, we think of some one as 
over-ruling, commanding, or requir- 
ing obedience. This carries with it 
the idea of the taking away of 
the freedom of the will. God is 
King of the ethereal spirits, Father 
of his only begotten Son, and Mas- 
ter of the children of men ; but the 
nature of God is perfect and di- 
vine; so instead of dominating us 
He gives us absolute freedom of 
choice. Satan and his host of angels 
willed to oppose the Almighty; 
Christ willed to redeem man from 
the wiles of the Evil one and man, 
although grace abounds, must will 
to be saved before redemption can 
be a reality to him. 

In spite of the fact that men are 
free to choose as they will, their 
choice is their fate ; and by and by 
it will arise and compel them, and 
there is no escape. A man goes into 
business, and for years he wills to 
give to it his whole time and soul 
and life. His motto is, "Drive your 
business," and he drives it. But at 
length he wakes up and finds him- 
self driven by his business. One of 
the early settlers one evening re- 
turned home in time to see a bear 
walk through the open door into his 
log cabin. Cautiously he crept up, 
slammed the door shut, and putting 
his back to it shouted, "Ive got him ! 
I've got him !" But the bear became 
excited and began to rage up and 
down the narrow room. There was 
no way of fastening the door, and 
it took all the man's power to keep 
the ferocious beast from hursting it 
(Continued on page 27) 



January 

January is just chuck full of 
weather. It occurs every day. A 
person setting forth on a journey 
should take raincoat, sweater, 
umbrella, ulster, Palm Beach suit, 
red flannel underwear and bathing 
suit, and then stay at home. 

January is the first month in the 
year in which to break the fine new 
set of resolutions adopted on New 
Year's Day. Sometimes it is diffi- 
cult to get them all thoroughly 
broken in one month. However, it 
is remarkable how much a person 
can do by trying. 

Human nature is different in Jan- 
uary from what it is in December. 
For some unaccountable reason, 
boys who kept the wood- box well 
filled in December, now talk back 
to their parents and can not be in- 
duced to work. They are different 
boys, altogether. Girls are always 
good, no matter what the month is. 

January thaws occur this month ; 
as a rule they are very wet. Some- 
times they are wetter than other 
times. It depends a good deal on 
whether you are in doors or out. 

We predict that January will be 
cold this year in regions where the 
temperature falls to a low mark. 
It will be warmer in sections where 
the temperature is higher. A good 
way to tell what the weather is go- 
ing to be is to wait and see. 

E. Z. S. O. 



Let your actions be equal to 
your promises. 



Rather be beaten in right than 
succeed in wrong. 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Alumni Notes 



H. K. Geyer, '16 is engaged in 
Pastoral service in Fairbanks, Ohio. 

Frances Ulrich, '16, is serving the 
A. Buch Foundry Co. as a Steno- 
grapher. 

Louis J. Ulrich, '16 is assisting his 
father in the automobile business in 
Elizabethtown. 

Ira P. Herr, '16, is in the employ 
of the W. A. Withers Shoe Factory 
in Elizabethtown. 

A. C. Baugher, '20 and Ella Booz 
Baugher, '20 have lately moved 
into a suite of rooms in the new 
apartment house. 

Gertrude A. Keller, '12 is en- 
gaged as Stenographer in the In- 
come Tax office of the Treasury De- 
partment in Washington, D. C. 

L. Margaret (Haas) Schwenk, 
'10 and her husband Elder Chas. A. 
Schwenk are serving the church in 
Sugar Valley in a pastoral capacity. 

Trostle P. Dick, '08 is living in 
Chicago with his family. He is at- 
tending Bethany Bible School 
equipping himself for greater ser- 
vice to the church. 

Daniel B. Hoffman, '13 is en- 
gaged in General Farming near 
Smithsburg, Md. He is an active 
Sunday School superintendent in 
the Welty Church. 

Clarence Ebersole, '17 is assist- 
ing the principal of the Browns- 
town High School. His boys say he 
knows Latin and has the ability of 
making them get Latin also. 

Myra A. Bohn, '20 spent two 
weeks on College Hill attending the 
Training School, thus preparing to 
conduct a Vacation Bible School 
this summer in her home church. 



Linda B. Huber, '14 in partner- 
ship with Miss Berret has opened a 
splendidly equipped music store in 
Elizabethtown. Their store shows 
the marks of ability that insures 
success. 

David L. Landis, '05 has entered 
the Insurance Business with S. B. 
Kiefer, '04 who has been handling 
a rapidly growing business as 
Notary Public and in Insurance in 
Elizabethtown. 

Andrew C. Hollinger, '10, has 
just closed a very successful year 
with the Aluminum Cooking Uten- 
sil Co. "Andy" is a genuine "Wear- 
ever" salesman. His results next 
year are sure to eclipse those of the 
past year. 

Isaac S. Wampler, '11 recently 
paid a visit to his Alma Mater. Mr. 
Wampler is in the employ of the 
Central Chemical Company of 
Hagerstown, Md., in whose interest 
he had made a business trip to 
Lancaster. 

C. B. Latshau, '08 has entered the 
bakery business in Waynesboro, as 
a member of the firm of a fine large 
baking establishment. In addition 
he is a partner in organizing a 
branch office of the R. L. Dollings 
Co. Investment Bankers. 

Sara C. Shissler, '20 is attending 
Manchester College this year. We 
learned with sorrow of the sudden 
death of her mother during the 
holiday vacation. We extend to her 
in this hour of grief our sincere 
sympathy and we point her to an 
All-loving Father who doeth aH 
things well and in whose trust there 
is peace and comfort. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



27 



Free Will 

(Continued from page 25) 
open and destroying him. Instead of 
his having the bear, the bear had him 

If a man wills to do evil, his 
lower nature will so grip him that 
he becomes a slave to it. Sam Carey 
testified one night in the Water 
Street Mission that, if a glass of 
whiskey stood within reach of his 
hand and he absolutely knew that 
to drink it would plunge him into 
hell within ten seconds, he would 
drink it without an instant's hesita- 
tion. He couldn't help himself. 

But we can thank God this power 
never comes upon us with a sudden 
swoop. We begin always by our 
own choosing or by being our own 
masters, and we can always remain 
masters if we will. The devil al- 
ways makes a long and steady ap- 
proach with great patience. We 
must give him his due ; he strikes 
like the rattlesnake only after he 
has repeatedly warned his victim. 
It is impossible to go to hell without 
passing with open eyes a thousand 
red danger-signals. 

Now look for a moment in the 
other direction and think of the re- 
sults of the man or woman whose 
choice has always been for the bet- 
ter things of life and who has got- 
ten a real vision of the living Christ. 
One glimpse of the face of Jesus 
Christ changed Paul from a narrow 
Pharisee persecuting the Church 
into a great evangelist crying from 
city to city "For me to live in 
Christ." Just so Livingstone was 
driven into Africa among perils and 
desolation. To tell what men have 
done because of the vision of the 
Christ would be to write a com- 



plete history of the Christian 
Church. It requires our own free will 
to get the vision and to love Him, 
but then we become perfectly help- 
less. Christ himself realized this 
compelling force when he said to 
his disciples, "If you love me, you 
will keep my commandments." Of 
course they would if they really 
loved him ; they couldn't help it. As 
soon expect the flower to turn away 
from the sun as to willfully disobey 
God if we really love Him. 

Thus we see that choice is free, 
and yet by that freedom we bind 
ourselves with fitters that can nev- 
er be broken. To aspire to a life 
that will be strong and pure and 
holy is indeed to take higher 
ground ; but it is taking vastly high- 
er ground when we forget ourselves 
and resolve to make ourselves a 
compeller of other men into that 
life that is strong and pure and 
holy. "Go out into the highways 
and hedges and compel them to 
come in," said Jesus. That is our 
commission. L. H. 



How About The Close Finish? 

An Englishman, Scotchman and 
Irishman were indulging in remin- 
iscences of sporting occasions. 

"The closest race I ever saw was 
a yacht race," deposed the English- 
man "in which one of the boats that 
had been recently painted won by 
the breadth of the coat of paint." 

"The closest race I ever saw," de- 
clared the Scotchman," was one in 
which a horse, stung by a bee, won 
by the height of the swelling on 
his nose." 

"The closest race I ever saw" 
said the Irishman." is the Scotch." 



28 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Darby Brand Canned Foods Are Quality 
Packed. Packed Exclusively For 

Comly, Flanigen & Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 

118 & 120 So., Delaware Ave., Phila. 

Ask Your Dealer For Darby Brand 
A Trial will convince 



A. B. DRACE 
PAINTER 

AND 

PAPER HANGER 

S. Market St. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



:OLLEGE JEWELRY OF THE BETTER 
SORT 

J. F. APPLE CO. 

MANUFACTURING 
JEWELER 

CLASS PINS & JEWELRY PRIZE CUPS, 

FRATERNITY JEWELRY MEDALS 

120 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 

DR. S. J. HEINDEL & SON 

DENTIST 

Out-of-Town Friday each week 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

HEADQUARTERS FOR MAGAZINES 

Subscriptions and Counter Sales 

Best Display in County 

THE ROOT MAGAZINE AGENCY 

121 W. High Street Elizabethtown, Pa. 



| FOR PHOTOGRAPHS 

| CALL AT BISHOP'S 

\ New and Modern Studio 

[ Elizabethtown, Penna. 

I We Guarantee All Work 

:' See us before having your diploma or those pictures framed. 

\ AMATEUR FINISHING SOLICITED 

EASTMAN LINE OF KODAKS AND FILMS FOR SALE 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



29 



Franklin & Marshall College 

LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 
Offers Liberal Courses in Arts and Sciences 

Campus of 54 acres with ten buildings 
including Gymnasium and complete Ath- 
letic Field. 

For Catalogue apply to 
HENRY H. APPLE, D.D., LL.D., Pre.. 



GO TO 

HORSTS 

CENTRE SQUARE 

for 

Oysters, Ice Cream, Confectionery 



GANSMAN'S 

Corner North Queen and Orange Street* 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



Men's 
Reliable Outfitters 

Suits To Order From 
Thirty To Sixty Dollars 



Waterman Fountain Pens 

— AT— 

Ream's Book Store 



Y. M. C. A. BUILDING 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 

H. H. GOOD 

Gentral Meat Market 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 



Mfgrs. of Plain Clothing for 39 years 
ONE PRICE— Always the Lowest 



Bell Phone 31R4 
ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

LANCASTER SANITARY MILK CO. 



PASTURIZED MILK 

AND 
CREAMERY BUTTER 



PURITY ICE CREAM 

North and Frederick Sts. 
BOTH PHONES, LANCASTER, PA. 

CLOTHING FOR THE MAN OR BOY 

Complete line of 

SUITS & OVERCOATS 

Suits made to your measure. Men's 
famishing a specialty. Best make of Shoes 
of all kinds for Men, Ladies and Children. 

Agent for first-class Laundry 



J. N. OLWEILER 
Near Centre Square Elizabethtown 



30 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



EAT 

Gifnzenhaiiser's Bread 

Delivered by 

E. .C HEILMAN 

Opposite P. R. R. Station Elizabethtown 
Save Your Money by Bringing Your Shoes 

E. W. MILLER 

DEALER IN SHOE FINE 

All Kinds of 

Old Shoe Repairing Neatly Done 

221 South Market Street 

ELIZABETHTOWN, :-: :-: PENNA. 



LUMBER 

AND 

MILL WORK 



We saw timbers 80 ft. and longer and 
deliver a barn complete in a couple weeks. 



B. F. Hiestand & Sons 



MARIETTA, 



PENNA. 






When In Need Of 

SHOES 

WHICH WILL GIVE YOU EXTREMELY LONG WEAR COME TO 

The W. A. Withers Shoe Co. 

OLD MARKET HOUSE BLDG. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



< Prompt, Careful Attention Given To Mail Orders 

3O0O0OOOOO0OOOOOOO0OOOOOO0OO0O0O0O000OO000O00000O00< 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



31 



QUALITY 

LEBANON 

BOLOGNA 

Made in the Most Modern and 

Sanitary Plant 
Manufacturing this Famous Product 



"MORRIS SUPREME" 

FOOD PRODUCTS 

Advertised and known over the 
Entire World 

THE LEBANON BOLOGNA 
and 

PROVISION CO. 

D. B. Buck, Secretary and Mgr. 

H. W. Buck, Distributor 



CLASS PINS AND RINGS 

For Colleges, High Schools, Sunday 
Schools, etc. Illustrated catalog mailed 
upon request. We are also Headquarters 
for Colleges and High School pennants. 
Let us know your wants. 

UNION EMBLEM CO. 
Dept. 89, Palmyra, Pa. 




Imade on honor-buTltfor service; 



Base Ball and Lawn Tennis Goods 

Foot Ball and Basket Ball Goods 

Sporting Goods Of All Kinds 

Books, Stationery and Office 

Supplies 

DUTEWEILER 

813 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, :-: PENNA. 



WHATEVER YOU NEED IN 

MERCHANDISE 

ALWAYS GO TO 

GREENBLATT'S DEPT. STORE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 
IT WILL PAY YOU 



>ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooocxx>oexxK9ooooooooooooooo 

DEMY & DETRA 

Dealers in 

FARM IMPLEMENTS AND REPAIRS, HUBER TRACTORS, GASOLINE AND 
OIL ENGINES, HAND AND POWER PUMPS 




Ind. Phone 628 
Bell Phone 63-R2 



32 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Conducted on Sanitary Principles 

is the 

RALPH GROSS 

SHAVING PARLOR 

Agency for Manhattan Laundry 


THE BEST THERE IS IN 

HARDWARE 

At the Lowest Possible Price 

BOGGS' QUALITY HARDWARE STORE 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



LEHMAN & WOLGENUTH 
CO A L 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED and FLOUR 
BOTH 'PHONES ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



JOHN M. SHOOKERS 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 

Repairing a Specialty 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 



Kodaks & Films Stationery 

H. K. DORSHEIMER 

Confections Athletic Goods 



) O00000O00000000O0OO0O000O0O000O00OO0O0O(XXKXXX)OOO0000000000O l 

PIANOS-V1CTROLAS 

Musical Instruments of Every Description 
Our Line Is Complete 



32 Makes of Pianos, 40 Styles 

Victor. Cheney, Star, Franklin and Solotone Phonograph 
Popular Sheet Music 9c a Copy 



CASH OR EASY PAYMENT PLAN 



KIRK JOHNSON & CO. 

16-18 W. King Street LANCASTER, •:- PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



33 



GO TO 



GUY The BARBER 

HE'S ON THE SQUARE 



Kwick-Lite, Flashlights 

Kyanize, Floor Finish 



Joseph H. Rider & Son 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

FOR GOOD EATS CALL AT 

Mornafiifs' Restaurant 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

OYSTERS IN SEASON 

ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO VISIT 

HIRSH & BR0. 

Centre Square, LANCASTEI 

for 

Ready-Made and Made-to-Order 

Clothing for Men and Boys 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS 



We are one of the largest manufacturers of 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

in the United States 



Strictly One Price To All 

Established in 1854 



KIEFFER & LANDIS 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

Real Estate 

Insurance Collections 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



BOOKS 



BIBLES 



STATIONERY 

Phonographs 



I. A. SHIFFER 



39 S. Market St. 



Eliza bethtown 



COLLE.GE, HILL DAIRY 

PURE MILK AND CREAM 

Delivered Daily 

' S. G. GRAYBILL 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

H. H. BRANDT 

Dealer in all kinds of 
BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE AND 
ROOFING PAPER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



CENTRAL 
MUSIC STORE 



Victrolas, Grafonolas, Records, Stringed 
Instruments, Stationery, Kodaks, Eastman 
Films, Waterman Fountain Pens and 
Greeting cards. 

Films Developed and Primed 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



34 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



C. Schock, President J. E. Longenecker, V. President 

H. N. Nissly, Cashier 

SECURITY PROGRESS 

UNION NATIONAL MOUNT JOY BANK 



MOUNT JOY, 



PENNA. 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus and Profits $264,000.00 

Deposits $1,324,871.00 

An Honor Roll National Bank, Being 421 in Strength in the United States and 

2nd in Lancaster County 

Resources $2,165,000.00 

All Directors Keep in Touch With the Bank's Affairs 

The Bank Board Consists of the Following: 

H. C. Schock Eli F. Grosh I. D. Stehman Christian L. Nissley 

J. E. Longenecker John G. Snyder J. W. Eshleman Johnson B. Keller 

T. M. Breneman Eli G. Reist Samuel B. Nissley S. N. Mumma 

Rohrer Stoner 

WE PAY 4% INTEREST ON CERTIFICATES AND SAVINGS 



SCHMIDT 
BAKERY 



Harrisburg, Pa. 



PRINTING 



For Schools, Colleges, Etc. is our hobby. 
The fact that we have a city equipped 
printing office in a country town, is suf- 
ficient evidence that we can do satis- 
factory work and last but not least, our 
prices are right. At present we are print- 
ing many monthlies for schools thruout 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This book- 
let is the product of our office. If the work 
appeals to you, get our price on your 
publication. 



"The BULLETIN 

Jno. E. Schroll, Propr. 

MOUNT JOY, PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



35 



THE WILLEY COMPANY INC. 

Superior Laundry Machinery 



FACTORY COLUMBIA, PENNA. 



OFFICE PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



109 East King Street 




Lancaster, Penna, 



JACOB FISHER 

8 Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
WATCHMAKER & JEWELER 
With you for 40 years that's all 
From 10 to 20 per cent, lower than the 
lowest for the same grade of make. 




Seller's Kitchen Cabinet, the best ser- 
vant in your house. I have just received 
a half car load of above cabinets, which I 
will sell at Special reductions during Octo- 
ber and November. Call and see the Cabi- 
net, and get prices. 



H. S. HOTTENSTEIN, 
R. D. 2 ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



HERSHEY TRUST CO. 

HERSHEY, PENNA. 
Capital, Surplus and Profits $425,000.00 
Resources $3,500,000.00 
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 
M. S. Hershey, President 
W. H. Lebhicker, V. Pres. 
Ezra F. Hershey, V. Pres. 
S. C. Stechon, Treas. 
John A. Landis U. G. Risser, M.D. 

J. B. Leithiser John E. Snyder 

Wm. F. R. Murrie A. W. Stauffer 

Commercial Banking Department 
Saving Department Trust Department 

LARGEST CIRCULATION AND 
ADVERTISING PATRONAGE 

Elizabethtown Chronicle 

Fifty-one Years Old and Still Young 



Garrett, Miller & Co. 



Electrical 
Supplies 



N. E. Cor. Fourth & Orange SU. 
WILMINGTON, -:- -:- DELAWARE 



36 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



JOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOJ 

Hertzler's Department Store 

N. E. CORNER CENTRE SQUARE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 




Always Ready to Supply Your Needs Satisfactorily in 
DRY GOODS, STAPLE AND FANCY NOTIONS, BEST GROCERIES, FRUITS, 
SWEETMEATS, SHOES, WINDOW SHADES, QUEENSWARE, MEN'S 
WOMEN'S, BOYS' AND GIRL'S CLOTHING, OIL CLOTH, LINO- 
LEUM, CARPETS, RUGS, ETC. 

Goods displayed on three floors and separate carpet store, three doors 
east of Post Office. 

Agents for made to measure clothing — International Tailoring Co. of New 
York. 

We carry full stocks notwithstanding the great difficulty in obtaining 
goods at these high prices. 

Long experience in merchandising goe with prices of goods purchased here. 

HERTZLER BROS. 



)00O00CKX>OOOO0O0OOOOOO00OOO00000000000000000000OO0OOO0OOOOOOO<' 



GARBER GARAGE 




Benj. F. Garber 




ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. Ind. Phono 60SA 

GENUINE 

FORD 

PARTS 

ACCESSORIES 

Our Repair Department Is Complete with the Latest Ford Approved Machinery 
Ford Prices Used All Work Guaranteed 

QQQQQQGQQQQQGQQQQQQQQQOQQQQQQ®aQQOQQQQQQ<XX2QOQOQQQOOQOOQ 



KLEIN'S 

Milk Chocolate 

Almond Bars 



"The Milkiest Kind of Milk Chocolate" 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

MUTH BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN 

Coal, flour, Feed and lumber 

Our Special Domino Feed 

We aim to give a square deal that will merit 
your trade and friendship 

ELIZABETHTOWN, 




>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOQQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO(K>?XX>OOOOOOOOOOOC4 

Elizabethtown College 

The Homelike School 

Stands For 

HIGHER THINKING 

BETTER LIVING AND GREATER SERVICE 



High 


IMPORTANT 


ST 




Strong 


Ideals 
Excellent 


DR. CHUN'S LECTURE 
March 21, 1921 


Faculty 
Best 


Christian 
Atmosphere 


HOMERIAN ORATORICAL 
CONTEST 

March 25, 1921 


Modern 
Methods 


All Virtues 
At a Premium 


JUNIOR ORATORICAL CONTE 
April 22, 1921 


Low 
Rates 


UPRIG 


HTNESS AND THOROUGHNESS 


REQU1 


RED 






OUR MOTTO 







tt 



EDUCATE FOR SERVICE" 



If you are looking for a life-work or calling, if you are eager to be of the 
greatest service possible, don't fail carefully to consider the opportunities for 
service in the teaching profession. The touch of the teacher is eternal. The 
teaching profession is calling loudly for worthy young men and women to 
enter this depleted and yet greatest of professions. Elizabethtown College 
offers courses that prepare teachers for the Public Schools, High Schools, 
Colleges, Commercial High Schools, Business Colleges, Mission Fields, Music 
Fields, Bible and Religious Education. 

A TEACHERS' COLLEGE UNDER CLOSE AND CAREFUL CHRISTIAN 

SUPERVISION. 



ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. , 
tooococoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooco 



.« 



«Lo<2 



WX^g^ 



OUR COLLEGE Til 





£LigAl£TH70WM,PA 



CX3000000000CO000000000O0O00000O00OOOO0O0OOOO00O000000O0O000O0O 




What about the homeyou* 
have promisedyourself 

build it NOW 1 



See us for FREE building helps- 
working plans and cost estimates 



We Are Manufacturers of 

Doors and Window Frames, Doors and Sash, Mouldings, Dressers, Shutters and 

Blinds, Porch Work and Columns, Screens and Storm Sash, Hotbed 

Sash, Stair Work and Interior Finish 

And Dealers In 

Rough Lumber, Flooring and Ceiling, Fir Porch Flooring, Building Lime, Sand, 

Plaster, White Ftnish, Hydrated Lime, Brick, Cement, Asbestos, 

Asphalt, and Roll Roofing, Slate, Wall Board 

WE SPECIALIZE IN THE MANUFACTURE OF 

Shipping Cases and Tobacco Shooks 



We solicit your business and aim to give you prompt and satisfactory ser- 
vice on short notice. It is not necessary that we build for you in order to 
sell you the material; call to see us or 'phone when in the market for any- 
thing in our line and we shall be only too glad to give you our best service. 

Ask for our suggestions and we will cheerfully help you in planning your 
new buildings or remodeling your old ones. 

ELIZABETHTOWN PLANING MILL 

HOFFER BROS., Proprietors 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



Bell Phone 3R5 
Independent 646A 



%ff ^^ff i ff t ff d * » *^*^ > " i t ^J^J^^J^JnJ^J^ ^i^^af^J ^^^J^J^J ^jj^jj^J^J^J^J \ 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



»OOOOOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO( 

W. S. SMITH, President PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MaRTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

ELIZABETHTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL $100,000.00 

SURPLUS & PROFITS 144,000.00 

q General Accounts Solicited Interest Paid On Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent 

DIRECTORS: 

W. S. Smith Elmer W. Strickler Peter N. Rutt 

F. W. Groff J. S. Risser B. L. Geyer 

E. C. Ginder Amos P. Coble E. E. Coble 

> 300000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000? 
) OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC 

ELIZABETHTOWN EXCHANGE BANK 



Now Occupies Its New Bank Building 
Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 

Pays Interest on Time Deposits 

OFFICERS 

A. G. HEISEY, President ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier 
I. H. STAUFFER, Asst. Cashier C. A. COBLE, Teller 

DIRECTORS 

A. G. Heisey H E Landis B. H. Greider 

Allen A. Coble ~ ^ „ M. K. Forney 

H. J. Gish Ge0 ' D - B ° ggS W. A. Withers 

Jos. G. Heisey E - E - Hernley , A c Fridy 

)QOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO< 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



PLAIN 
CLOTHING 



WATT & SHAND 



Centre Square 



LANCASTER, PA. 



GEORGE S. DAUGHERTY GO. 

N. York--Chicago--Pittsburg 



Quality No. 10 fruits and vege- 
tables in No. 10 tins. 



DODGE BROTHERS MOTOR CARS 

R. H. FORNEY 

GARAGE AND REPAIR SHOP 

On North Market Street 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- -:- PENNA. 

CHAS. b. dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



PATRONIZE 

OUR 

ADVERTISERS 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SINCE THE DAYS OF THE GOLDSMITHS 

The goldsmiths of olden times, with whom banking had its be- 
ginning, undertook only to safeguard money and valuables en- 
trusted to their care. 

Banks have increased their activities since that time until they 
have become an indipensable factor in the finance and commerce 
of all civilized nations. 

The modern business man and woman who make full use of 
their bank looks upon it as an institution dealing in business in- 
telligence as well as money and credit. 

We invite business men and women to make use of all our fa- 
cilities for service. 

The Farmers' National Bank 

LITITZ, PENNA. 
S. W. Buch, President J. H. Breitigan, Cashier. 



KEYSTONE NATIONAL BANK 

MANHEIM, PENNSYLVANIA 

CAPITAL $ 125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS 165,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 1,500,000 

FOUR PER CENT. INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS 
ACCOUNTS LARGE OR SMALL SOLICITED 

OFFICERS 
John B. Shenk, President 
H. M. Beamesderfer, Vice-President H. A. Merkey, Teller 

J. G. Graybill, Cashier Norman Weaver, Clerk 

Clair H. Keen, Asst. Cashier Anna Shollenberger, Clerk 

DIRECTORS 
Jacob G. Hershey 
J. B. Shenk 



H. M. Beamesderfer 
John R. Cassel 
Morris B. Ginder 



R. O. Diehl 
John B. Hossler 
W. W. Moyer 



OUR TRUST DEPARTMENT CAN SERVE YOU AS 

Executor, Administrator, Assignee, Receiver, Guardian 
Agent, Attorney in Fact, Registrar 
OF STOCKS AND BONDS, ETC. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Trimmer's Great 
Bargain Emporium 

On the Square 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



Elizabethtown Roller Mills 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 
FLOUR, CORN MEAL AND FEED 



J. V. BINKLEY, Propr. 

402-404 South Market St. 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Pa. 



McLaughlin Bros. 
DRAYMEN 



LOCAL, LONG DISTANCE HAULING 
26 Washington Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
BELL PHONE 39-R2 

MARTIN 

READY-MADE AND MADE-TO-ORDER 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 

CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS AND SHOES 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MOUNT JOY, PA. 



Thomas J. Brown 
Jacob S. Carmany 
H. H. Myers 
Abraham L. Nissley 



directors: 

Gabriel Moyer 
Jos. B. Hostetter 
B. S. Stauffer 
Jno. W. Newcomer 
Amos N. Musser 



H. Roy Nissley 
Jacob N. Hershey 
E. S. Gerberich 
Henry H. Eby 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus & Profits $150,000.00 

officers: 

THOMAS J. BROWN, President J. S. CARMANY, Vice President 

R. FELLENBAUM, Cashier 

4% Paid on Savings Accounts and Time Certificates. Resources $1,600,000 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SOUTH END GROCERY 

FRESH, FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES, CANDIES AND LUNCH GOODS 
"The little store with big business" 

Levi C. Hershey 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



A. W. CAIN 

DRUGGIST 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 

THE BETTER REPAIRING OF THE 

BARNES SHOE SHOP 

WILL GRATIFY YOU 

It's Real Economy 

43 South Market St ELIZABETHTOWN 

NISSLEY'S LUNCH & DINING ROOMS 

David D. Clare, Proprietor 

14-16 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER. PENNA, 



LANCASTER SCHOOL SUPPLY CO. 

L. B. Herr & Son 
Booksellers 

Stationeries 

Printers 

46-48 W. King St. LANCASTER, PA. 

THE GROSS 
CONFECTIONERY 

122 S. Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



BARD-BLANKENMYER CO., Inc. 

plumbingTheating 

and SHEET METAL WORK 



118 South Queen Street, 



LANCASTER, PA. 



GUNSMITH 



LOCKSMITH 



DOMNITZ BROS. 

If it's a (LOCK) key, we have it 
222 }£ N. Q. St. LANCASTER, PA. 



A. C. McLANACHAN 
BARBER 

21 E. High St 

Second Door From Post Office 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



BUCH MANUFCATURING COMPANY 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



WE BUILD THE FOLLOWING GOODS IN 

THE COLLEGE TOWN 



Wheelbarrows, Corn Shelters, Wood Saws, 
Land Rollers, Pulverizers, Water Troughs 



HENRY L. GISE 



Notary Public, Surveyor and Conveyancer 

Insurance of all Kinds 

Agent for 

State Capital Savings and Loan 

Association 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

J. W. G. Hershey, Pres. 

J. Bitzer Johns, V. Pres. 

Henry R. Gibbel, Sec. & Treas. 



The Lititz Agricultural 

Mutual Fire 

Insurance Company 



Insures against Lightning, Storm and Fir* 

Insurance in force $39,000,000 
Issues both Cash and Assessment Policies 



13 EAST MAIN STREET 
LITITZ, PENNA. 



PHONOGRAPHS 

We handle only one make and that is the 

EDISON E7, Y ai 

FISHER'S 

8 Centre Square 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



EBY SHOE COMPANY 

Incorporated 
Manufacturers of 

MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S 

FINE WELT AND TURNED 

SHOES 



LITITZ, 



PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



HEATING and PLUMBING 



Miller Pipeless Furnaces 

and 
Leader Water Systems 



LEO KOB 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



J. W. ZARP088 

GENERAL HARDWARE 

Sporting and Housefurnishing 
Goods 



ELIZABETHTOWN. -:- PENNA. 

POTTS DEPARTMENT STORE 
"EPHRATA'S BIGGEST BEST STORE" 

EBERLY BROTHERS 
SHOES COAL 

Main & State S. State St. 



Ephrata, Pa. 



CHAS. K. MUSSER 



Electrical 
Contractor 

All Kinds of 

Electrical Supplies and Fixtures 

HOUSE WIRING A SPECIALTY 

The Ephrata Review 

$1.50 A YEAR 

Best Job Printing 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



Chas. S. Yeager, Propr. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



)QOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXX>OOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOe 



HIVE 




HIVE 



DEPARTMENT STORE 



OUR CREED 



We believe in the goods we are selling in our ability 
to get results. We believe that honest goods can be sold 
to honest people by honest methods. We believe in work- 
ing, not wasting; in laughing, not crying; in boosting, 
not knocking; and in the pleasure of doing business. We 
believe that a man gets what he goes after; that a cus- 
tomer today is worth two customers tomorrow; and that 
no man is down and out until he has lost faith in himself. 
We believe in courtesy, in kindness, in generosity, in good 
cheer, in friendship, and in honest competition. We be- 
lieve in increasing our business, and that the way to do 
it is to reach for it. 



WE ARE REACHING FOR YOURS 



A. A. ABELE 



ELIZABETHTOWN. 
>ooooooooooooooooooooooex>oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo< 



The Flittin' 



The flitting began in the morning 
And busily all the day 
The boys were sweating and toiling 
Their belongings to convey, 
To the new apartment building 
Which was surrounded by mud and 
clay. 

Some faces were long and some 

sour 
Some smiling and happy and sweet 
The day will be ever remembered 
For the boys made tidy and neat 
The rooms of Memorial made va- 
cant 
Which had not happened for many 
a week. 

Very early the dear boys appeared 
Bearing suitcases, pictures and hats 
They hung to their rackets like 

leeches 
Their comforters flung on their 

backs. 
The lamps, rugs, umbrellas and pil- 
lows 
Were in evidence on this side and 
that. 



When the time came for girls to be 

moving 
The boys were again on the job 
Such bustling and wonderful 

hustling 
Is seldom seen except by a cop. 
For each tried to out do the other 
And be first to get to the top. 

Everything that a girls' heart could 
wish for 

Was carried across by the girls 

Gowns, shirt waists, coats, hats and 
umbrellas 

All of which got your head in a 
swirl. 

But the thing indeed most distract- 
ing 

Was the bobbing and waving of 
curls. 

Quiet reigns once again in Memorial 
All is still and the order restored. 
Boys have all found their place in 

the 'partment 
And they look very far from bored. 
Smiles have taken place of dark 

frowns 
Which makes everv one adored. 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Jacob S. Harley 

Associate Editor Florence T. Moyer 

Departmental Editor H. H. Nye 

Alumni Editor L. W. Leiter 

Religious News Editor • . .Ezra M. Wenger 

^ Emma Ziegler 
School News \ 

( Stanley Ober 

Business Manager J. Z. Herr 

Circulation Manager E. G. Meyer 

Our College Times is published monthly during the Academic year of Elizabeth- 
town College. 

This paper will have to be discontinued as soon as the time of subscription expires 
as an action of the United States legislature. 

Please renew in time and report any change of address to the business manager. 

Subscription rates one dollar per year; fifteen cents per copy; six subscriptions 
$5.00 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



There is a tide in the affairs of men 
Which, taken at the flood, 

leads on to fortune : 
Omitted, all the voyage of their 

life 
Is bound in shallows and in miseries 
On such a full sea, we are now 

afloat; 
And we must take the current when 

it serves 
Or lose our ventures. 

Shakespeare. 



The Great Man 

This, the month of February is 
many times called the month of 
great men. It is true that February 
does mark the birthdays of three of 
our greatest presidents, Washing- 
ton, Lincoln and Roosevelt, also the 
birthdays of numerous English and 
American Literary men: Longfel- 
low, Lowell, Lanier, Dickens, and 
many other persons who have con- 
tributed richly to the growth and 
development of our country. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



Jestingly we joke about those of 
us whose birthdays fall in the 
month of February and thereby like 
to lay claim to greatness. The im- 
pulse in one to feel a call to great- 
ness is a thing to be cherished. A 
will in one to attain to the greatest 
height possible is to be- developed. 
It is each man's natural right to 
say what he will become whether 
the opportunity will make him or 
whether he will make the oppor- 
tunity. These great men live in our 
hearts today because of the hard 
rugged paths they have had to 
travel. What they have done for 
the world was done with effort, will 
power and a high ideal. We do not 
believe that favorable circum- 
stances made them what they were 
or such a man as Abraham Lincoln 
would never have attained what he 
did. It was inborn greatness in the 
man himself and untiring perse- 
verance to attain his goal. 

If only each one of us could 
catch a glimpse of the possibilities 
which lie before us; could believe 
that we can down difficulties; and 
could will with unfaltering faith 
and purpose to leave our littler- 
selves and attain to greater vision, 
greater service. King or slave of 
our own life ! King or slave which 
is it? "Invictus" gives us the ans- 
wer, the justly confident assertion 
which should beat in every heart. 



Opportunity 

Some say that Opportunity, if 
once she seeks your door and finds 
that you are not at home, departs 
to come no more. But I have noticed 
that she makes incessant daily 
rounds, and sometimes loudly 



pounds; she is no quitter, as they 
say, no swift and fleeting dame ; she 
comes and comes and comes again 
to help you play the game. It may 
be that you mope around and fail 
to let her in; if so, no matter when 
she comes, you cannot hope to win ; 
it may be that your eyes are blur- 
red, or that your ears of dulled; it 
may be that you sit and dream, by 
siren voices lulled; but she is there 
in patient mood, a messenger of 
fate ; and if you rise and seek for 
her you'll find her at your gate. The 
torch that's wasted by the flame 
will never brightly burn; the tide 
that surges from the beach will 
never more return. But there's an- 
other torch to light, and other tides 
that toil; and through the ruins of 
defeat still shines another goal. 

J. C. Bradshaw 



Invictus 

Out of the night that covers me, 
Black as the pit from pole to pole. 

I thank whatever gods may be 
For my unconquerable soul. 

In the fell clutch of circumstance 
I have not winced or cried aloud ; 

Under the bludgeonings of chance. 
My head is bloody, but unbowed. 

Beyond this place of wrath and 

tears, 

Looms but the horror of the 

shades. 

And yet the menace of the years 

Finds and shall find me unafraid. 

It matters not how straight the gate 
How charged with punishments 
the scroll ; 

I am the master of my fate ; 
I am the captain of my soul. 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Literary 



Requiescat 



The little white cottage with 
brown thatched roof and vine-cov- 
ered porch is half hidden by shady 
elms. Near by there is a little 
stream, and in its sparkling waters 
the beauty of the little cottage is 
mirrored. Old-fashioned flowers in 
profusion bloom in quaint flower- 
beds. And as the summer winds 
blow, they nod and beck and seem 
to wave a welcome to every passer- 
by. Fairer yet than this white cot- 
tage is the little white-haired wo- 
man who lives here all alone. Her 
fine, stalwart young son, for whom 
she lived and loved, lies somewhere 
in France where the red poppies 
bloom. But she does not grieve nor 
mourn, for she knows that it was so 
to be. Her indescribable loss only 
adds to her face a sad, wistful ex- 
pression, and to her bearing the 
marks of resignation and patience. 
Every one loves the little white- 
haired woman, and everyone is 
loved by her. To those who are dis- 
contented, to those who worry, to 
those who suffer from trials and 
misfortunes she is an oasis of com- 
fort. She gives them courage, hope 
and faith, and points them to one 
who in a greater way can comfort 
and cheer. Everything is so peace- 
ful and restful about the cottage 
because of the spirit that fills it, 
that one thinks a suitable name for 
the whole picture would be "Re- 
quiescat." 

Months have now passed. The 
flowers no longer nod and beck in 



the summer breeze. The trees no 
longer offer there friendly shade. 
And as for the stream that once 
lulled the whispering pines to sleep, 
it is now silent and motionless. The 
little cottage looks the same, ex- 
cept for the absence of the crimson 
rambler that grew on the west 
side of the house. The sun has 
just passed in unsurpassed 
splendor below the horizon. In the 
living-room of the little cottage the 
logs are crackling and burning in 
the hearth, giving to the beauty and 
simplicity of the room an additional 
touch of comfort. The little gray- 
haired woman is sitting in her cozy 
arm-chair by the window. She takes 
up her knitting and works for some 
time, then growing tired, drops her 
work to the floor and falls asleep. 

Several more months have passed. 
The cottage now looks dreary and 
desolate, because the happy spirit 
that once prevaded it has passed 
away into a more perfect pearl. 
And just beyond the garden 
blanketed with snow is the final 
resting place of the dear little 
woman. 

Developed from the Poem, called 
"Requiescat." L. F. 



My Visit to the Attic 

One dreary, rainy day my mother 
went to town to do some shopping. 
She left me at home alone to do the 
morning work. I hurried with the 
work and when I had it all done 
and the house arranged. I won- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



dered what I could do to spend the 
remainder of the time. After a 
while I got a book and read till I 
grew tired of it. Then I went all 
through the house trying to find 
something else to do. Presently I 
happened to think about the attic 
where mother Kept all the old 
books, newspapers and magazines. 

I went up to the attic which was 
lighted by only one window, and it 
looked dark up there. Back in the 
farthest corner was a large pile of 
papers, magazines, and the like, 
and in another corner stood an old 
trunk which was half full of nuts. 
Near it was an old chest filled with 
rags, and by its side lay a large pile 
of worn-out clothing. I made my 
way to the pile of papers. 

I picked up an old magazine and 
began reading. I found some inter- 
esting stories and was soon so over- 
tome by them that I didn't hear a 
noise. In a short time I had finished 
reading the magazine and began 
searching for another, when I spied 
a book entitled, "Tarzan of the 
Apes." I began reading. After a 
while I heard a thump, but I 
thought perhaps it was thundering, 
so I went on reading. I became so 
d» eply interested in the book that 1 
didn't hear the rats and mice danc- 
ing and capering around through 
1hp attic and gnawing at the old 
trunk. 

Then my attention was drawn 
away from my book when the nuts 
came rolling towards me from the 
trunk where the mice were gnawing 
I watched the creatures for some 
time and became interested in their 
pranks. All at once I heard a noise 



which sounded like some one groan- 
ing. I became frightened and my 
first thought was, "Are there 
spooks in this attic?" I sat motion- 
tionless and then I heard the noise 
a second time. I began looking 
around but could not see any thing 
unusual. I was afraid to move. I 
heard it the third time and I thot 
to myself, "I am going to find out 
what is making all this noise." I 
began to search, and in the search I 
found a small crevice in the wall. 
Just then I heard the sound again. 
Then I knew it was the wind whistl- 
ing through the crevice and making 
a noise as of some one groaning. 

I felt a little easier and went back 
to my reading again. In a few 
minutes mother called to me and 
said it was time to do the evening 
work. Well, I was surprised. I 
wondered where the day had gone 
to. I had forgotten every thing else 
when I was in the attic amid all the 
amusements. 

I went down stairs and it seemed 
as if I was in a different world. 
It looked so light and seemed 
so warm. I went about doing the 
chores of the evening and helped to 
get supper ready. After supper was 
over and the dishes were washed 
and put away, I told the rest of the 
family my experience's of the day. 
They seemed very much interested. 
I am now waiting for another op- 
portunoty to spend a day in the at- 
tic. I. V. 



All are architects of fate 

Working in these walls of time 
Some with massive deeds and great 

Some with ornaments of rhyme. 

Longfellow 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



College Life 

Persons who have never been 
away to school have missed some of 
the best times of their life. They 
know nothing about college life. 
They have not only missed good 
times but a chance to get an educa- 
tion. But it is the former that I 
wish to talk about. 

Would I want to miss dormitory 
life? I guess not. In the short time 
that I have been here, dormitory 
life has come to mean a big thing in 
my college experience. Who would 
not enjoy visiting the other boys 
when they have nothing to do? 
Those chats and rompings will never 
be forgotten. Then again, who does 
not enjoy playing jokes? Some do 
not enjoy having jokes played upon 
themselves. But to play a joke a 
person should be able to take a 
joke. Again those feeds we have 
occasionally add much joy to dormi- 
tory life. 

Another phase in college life is 
the college chums that come across 
our path and the friendships which 
are formed. Who would want to 
do without them? How we like to 
confide all our secrets in our chums, 
and how we like to discuss problems 
and questions with each other. 
Those hikes that we take with each 
other will never be forgotten. All 
our joys and sorrows are shared 
with each other. 

Another phase not to be forgot- 
ten is the religious life. In this lies 
the basis of our future church work. 
It is here that we get our training 
to lead the church in later life. The 
morning watches form a valuable 
training for extemporaneous talks. 



At this school especially we have 
a rare religious environment. 

College life gives us valuable so- 
cial training. Getting around among 
the fellows and making oneself 
agreeable to all is not an easy thing 
to do. College life will help us to 
overcome difficulties of this kind 
and will help us to be useful and in- 
fluential in later life. In our old 
age we will look back upon our col- 
lege life as one of our richest ex- 
periences. A. R. 



Maxims and Thoughts 

Who despises minutes cannot re- 
spect eternity. 



Motive is a well, method a pump. 



A laugh is worth a hundred 
groans. 



A man's best friends are his brain 
and ten fingers. 



All things are easy that are done 
willingly. 



Every donkey loves to hear him- 
self bray. 



Always in haste but never in a 
hurry. 



Kind words cost nothing. 



Work is oil; worry is acid. 



Better be a man than a million- 
aire. 



Good luck is a lazy man's esti- 
mate of a worker's success. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



My Creed 

I would be true, for there* are those 

who trust me ; 
] would be pure, for there are those 

who care ; 
] would be strong, for there is much 

to suffer; 
] would be brave, for there is much 

to dare. 

] would be friend of all — the foe — 

the friendless; 
] would be giving and forget the 

gift; 
i would be humble, for I know my 

weakness; 
] would look up — and laugh — and 

love and lift. 

H. A. Walter 



Atmosphere 

"Jack," said the old farmer to 
his son," remove those trousers and 
put on an old pair of overalls. Re- 
place that cap with some old straw 
'nat with the brim torn off. Leave 
your wrist watch in the house. In- 
stead of using the tractor today 
you may cultivate corn with that 
old single shore one horse cultiva- 
tor that the museum has been try- 
ing to buy from me. And take a 
few straws to the field to chew." 

"Aw, I say, pater" protested the 
young man, pausing in his job of re- 
pairing the farm dynamo "where 
do you get that antique stuff? 
You aren't thinking of going in for 
cartooning are you?" 

"Not at all. A moving picture 
concern has paid me a thousand 
dollars to shoot a few scenes of 
what they call typical farmers we 
mustn't disappoint them." 



L'ENVOI 

("L'envoi" is a much quoted 
poem, a favorite because it declares 
the right of each individual to self- 
development.) 

When Earth's last picture is painted 
And the tubes are twisted and 
dried, 

When the oldest colors have faded, 
And the youngest critic has died, 

We shall rest, and faith, we shall 
need 
It — lie down for an aeon or two, 

Till the Master of All Good Work- 
Men shall set us to work anew ! 

And those who were good shall be 
Happy: they shall sit in a golden 
chair; 
They shall splash at a ten-league 
Canvas with brushes of comet's 
hair; 
They shall find real saints to draw 
From — Magdalene, Peter and 
Paul; 
They shall work for an age at a 
Sitting and never be tired at all. 

And only the Master shall praise us, 

And only the Master shall blame; 
And no one shall work for money, 

And no one shall work for fame; 
But each for the joy of the working, 

And each, in his separate star. 
Shall draw the Thing as he sees it 

For the God of Things as They 
Are! 

— Rudyard Kipling. 



All the critics on earth cannot crush 

with their ban 
One word thats in tune with the 

nature of man. 

Lowell 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Departmental Notes 



Education 

This department offers two 
courses, the one of Junior College 
rank and the other of regular Col- 
lege standing. The former is the 
Pedagogical Course, revised to 
meet the changing and growing 
needs of those planning to teach in 
the ungraded rural elementary 
public schools. The latter is a regu- 
lar four-year College course leading 
to the A. B. in Education, open to 
those aiming to teach in public 
high schools, secondary schools and 
junior college. This latter course 
also prepares prospective super- 
visors of elementary education and 
principals for secondary schools of 
which there is a great dearth in our 
own country as well as in mission 
fields. 

Students from first class high 
schools may enter the next to the 
last year of the Revised Peda- 
gogical Course without examination 
and complete it in two years. 
Graduates from this Junior College 
Course in Education may enter the 
Junior year of the regular College 
Course in Education and complete 
it in two more years provided they 
maintain an average passing grade 
of 85 per cent, in the Junior Col- 
lege Course. Graduates from first 
class high schools will be admitted 
to the Freshman year of the College 
Course in Education without exam- 
ination. Literature descriptive of 
these courses, in greater detail, is 
now available. 

This department realizes that we 
need more and more an education 



which occupies itself with charac- 
ter formation by aiming to form 
specific useful habits in a thousand 
and one lines. It is not impression 
and acquisition of facts alone, but 
expression and development that 
we are aiming to foster. Practice 
Teaching in a real school situation 
and observations of real teaching 
together with reports and construc- 
tive criticisms of both will be an es- 
sential requirement hereafter. An 
agreement has been entered into 
with the town schools and several 
of the country schools for this im- 
portant phase of training in store 
for those selecting one or the other 
of these courses in Education. 



Latin Department 

"Wisdom is better than riches." 
We can never truly know or ap- 
preciate people until we learn their 
methods of thinking and of express- 
ing themselves. The Hebrew and 
Greek languages are studied today 
in order to understand the lives and 
thoughts of the people and thus get 
the fullest meaning of the Bible. 
So Latin would have an excuse for 
being studied, if only for the insight 
the student gets into the lives, 
thoughts and ideals of the people 
of the greatest nation of the An- 
cient World. But it has added 
values which are greater than this. 
It is the basis of all the popular 
Modern Languages in word build- 
ing as well as sentence structure. 
Every hour expended on the study 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



of Latin, with a definite aim, adds 
to our knowledge and compre- 
hension of our Mother Tongue. Be- 
sides these values, the choice litera- 
ture locked up in this language 
makes a delicious kernel for the one 
who will crack the Latin nut. 



Physical Culture 

-Get in tune" carolled the mea- 
dow lark in the field, "get in tune" 
sang the daffodils in the garden, 
'get in tune" gurgled the brook 
rippling down the hill-side ; and the 
man and woman with hard strained 
expressions came and listened, but 
did not understand. 

When God created this universe 
"he did a wonderful and a beautiful 
thing in making gladness in Nature. 
The bird is happy because it is a 
bird ; Wordsworth voiced in a poem 
the thought "An 'tis my faith that 
every flower enjoys the air it 
hreathes." But man, where does he 
fit in this scheme of gladness? Is it 
not sad that so many people simply 
do not fit in at all ! And all because 
they have not learned the secret of 
the birds and flowers of "being in 
tune." To be in tune with Life, then 
with Health. 

Life presents a number of greater 
and lesser horoes and heroines. On 
the other hand there are so many 
people who are simply "average." 
And why are they "average," 
while others are the heroes and 
heroines? It is because they are am- 
bitionless to be anything else. They 
are satisfied with dull minds, im- 
perfect bodies undeveloped souls. 



They lack that finer perception of 
God's plan for fitness of every per- 
son to "be somebody" not simply 
"average," and to have more per- 
fect life and buoyant health. 
Physical culture can help one on to 
this plan for life. Physical culture 
should be a fact in every student's 
life, not a requirement of the 
school, or a prescribed set of gym- 
nastic exercises to be formally 
taken but a fact, a practice in the 
life every student of the principles 
of health, and a happy, interested 
attitude toward life at its best, 
which alone can develop in one the 
secret of being in tune. 



Department of Biology 

A course in elementary Botany 
constitutes the last half of the 
course in Elementary Biology. 

The aim of this course is to give 
the Preparatory student a greater 
appreciation of the plant life of our 
environment. The course aims to 
emphasize the practical value as 
well as the value of plants in mak- 
ing our country more beautiful, and 
life more cheerful. 

The work therefore covers the 
field of plant life as a whole in- 
cluding the cereals and vegetables, 
the wild flowers and the trees. They 
each play a large part in the life 
activities of man. Too frequently 
we regard them as common place 
and of no value save as we can con- 
vert them into dollars and cents. 
We too often fail to realize that 
man depends wholly upon plant life 
for his food. To a great extent we 
depend directly upon plants to fur- 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



nish food such as wheat, corn, 
beets, cabbage and many others. 
Our only other source of food is 
the animal life which too is entirely 
dependent upon plant life for their 
existence. 

Besides, plant life influence char- 
acter in a very vital manner. He 
who loves flowers and appreciates 
plants fully as the magnificent work 
of the Creator has in his life many 
of the elements that make for sterl- 
ing character. 



Christianity Advancing 

"There is nothing new under the 
sun." Altho some times one thinks 
man has found or created some- 
thing new yet upon investigating 
one finds a mere combination of old 
material, old ideas and old laws. 
However there is a constant dis- 
covery of different things and in- 
vention of different ideas that it ap- 
pears as though new things are 
being added. This shows one plain- 
ly that there is a growth in produc- 
tion of combinations of natural and 
spiritual phenomena. 

In scientific fields are many evi- 
dences of this growth. It is tangible 
and the scientist can state facts and 
demonstrate laws which prove to 
the layman that there really is an 
advance in his respective sphere of 
action. This same thing holds true 
in the spiritual realm, only here it 
is not so perceptible because one 
must deal with abstract truths. It 
is true that the same fundamental 
truths of Christianity still hold. 
They will never change whether we 
accept them or respect them. How- 



ever there are different application- 
of these truths and principles in th<= 
Spiritual world the same as in th>e 
Physical world. The failure to see 
this fact is a refusal to grow. 

In the study of the Bible one has 
a remarkable opportunity to lean: 
how the general and fundamenta t 
Christian principles are applicable 
to every day and practical living 
and in accepting them to realize 
that Christianity is truly advancing 
not only in the lives of several in- 
dividuals but also in the life of the 
several communities and of the na- 
tion. Let Each Tomorrow Find Us 
farther Than Today — In Applied 
Christianity. 



General Chemistry 

The work in chemistry is de- 
signed to prepare the student to b*i 
a better citizen. We feel that no 
student is fully ready to enter life 
in the schoolroom, on the farm, in 
the home, in the shop, or in what- 
ever vocation one may select, with- 
out some knowledge of chemistry. 
Therefore, we aim to bring the stu- 
dent in touch with the chemistry of 
everyday affairs. The first part of 
the course deals with such funda- 
mental ideas and principles as 
chemical changes; acids, bases, and 
salts; weight relations; chemical 
nomenclature ; solution ; oxidation 
and combustion. After the studem 
has mastered these facts, practical 
topics of universal interest ar~ 
taken up, such as the chemistry of 
heating and lighting; air and ven- 
tilation ; water and its purification ; 
properties of metals; and food 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



values. This method of presenta- 
tion makes the facts and principles 
of chemistry of practical use thru- 
out life. 



The United States is now Producing 

Twenty per cent of the world's gold 

Forty per cent of the world's silver. 

Forty per cent of the world's iron 
and steel. 

Twenty-five per cent of the world's 
wheat. 

Forty per cent of the world's lead. 

Fifty per cent of the world's coal. 

Sixty per cent of the world's alu- 
minum. 

Sixty per cent of the world's copper 

Sixty per cent of the world's cotton. 

Sixty-five per cent of the world's oil. 

Seventy-five per cent of the world's 
coin. 

The demand for all commodities is 
greater than the supply. 

S. C. Allyn, Comptroller 



Special Spring Normal 

There will be a special effort put 
forth at Elizabethtown College to 
afford an opportunity for intensive 
study and further preparation for 
public school teachers. The teach- 
ing profession is a growing profes- 
sion and we believe that this special 
session will mean much for the 
teacher who desires to grow in ef- 
ficiency and usefulness in this chief 
of professions. 

The special Spring Normal will 
begin April 18 and continue for 
eight weeks to the end of the regu- 
lar Spring Term. A special teacher 
of large experience has been se- 
cured. A number of the regular 
teachers of the faculty will also 



have a part in this work. Last year's 
Spring Normal was a great success 
but this year greater opportunities 
are assured. 

There are a large number of stu- 
dents here now and because of 
crowded conditions those contem- 
plating taking work will please not 
forget to write for a room early. 
Catalogue rates will be charged. If 
interested be sure to write us soon. 



Resolutions of Sympathy 

Since the death angel has entered 
the home of one of our students, 
Witmer Eshleman, and has called 
away his mother, Mrs. John W. 
Eshleman, to a life of rest, be it 
therefore resolved : 

That we the faculty and students 
of Elizabethtown College hereby 
convey a message of sympathy to 
our fellow student, his bereaved 
father and all his brothers and sis- 
ters who feel very keenly the loss 
of a devoted mother at this hour 

That we all bow in reverent sub- 
mission to our Heavenly Father in 
whose hand rests the future of the 
life of each one of us, and whose 
will directs all things well. 

That we commend these be- 
reaved ones to the tender care of 
Him in whom abideth all love and 
tender sympathy, to heal the 
broken-hearted. 

That a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to the family and that they 
be printed in the Elizabethtown Pa- 
pers. 

H. H. Nye, 

Anna K. Enterline, 

Wilbur H. Hornafius, 

Committee. 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Literary Society Notes 



The Homerian Literary Society 

The work of the Homerian Liter- 
ary Society is increasing in interest. 
Those who serve on programs show 
that there was effort put forth in 
preparation. 

On the evening of February the 
4th, an interesting program was 
given at a private session of the So- 
ciety. Elizabeth Trimmer gave a 
reading, Burn's, "Cotter's Saturday 
Night." Another feature was a de- 
bate, "Resolved that England 
should grant Ireland Indepen- 
dence." The question was debated 
affirmatively by Grant Weaver 
while the negative side was dis- 
cussed by Arthur Moyer. The 
judges decided in favor of the nega- 
tive. The program for Feb. 12 was 
devoted to Music and Art. The in- 
terest in this program was in- 
creased by using slides, showing 
some of the best pictures of the art 
realm. A chalk talk was given by 
Esther Trimmer. "The Value of 
Music in Life," was discussed by 
Martha Martin; "The Value of Art 
in Life," by Harriet Eberly ; "The 
Setting of Patriotic Songs," by Su- 
pera Martz. An instrumental solo 
was given by Mary Henning and a 
vocal solo by Emma Ziegler. 

We hope this program may have 
helped every one who was present 
to appreciate good music and art to 
a greater extent than ever before. 
We appreciate the presence of our 
friends. Come again. 



The Penn Society 

The members feel that they are 



being very much benefited by their 
work in the Society. Although we 
find many obstacles in getting the 
Society in good running order, we 
must never forget the words of our 
motto, '*Labor Conquers all Things." 

On the evening of February the 
fifth, a number of students and their 
friends assembled in chapel to hear 
the following program: Piano Duet 
by Elizabeth Thomas and Floy 
Schlosser; The first edition of our 
Society paper, the "Penn Gazette" 
by Flavia Martz. An interesting de- 
bate was the next number. The 
question Resolved, that Lincoln was 
a greater man than Washington, de- 
bated affirmative by Noah Baugher 
and Edward Ziegler and negatively 
by Lydia Landis and Lester Royer. 
Both sides presented interesting 
and convincing facts. The Judges 
decided in favor of the negative 
side. A vocal selection entitled 
"Just a wearyin for you" was ren- 
dered by Elizabeth Zeigler. Over 
a vine covered fence two aged 
ladies indulged in village gossip. 
This was represented by Marion 
Hart and Beulah Shirk. Probably the 
best, at least the funniest part of 
the program was the last feature — 
a male trio by Edward Zeigler, 
John Bechtel and Lester Royer. 
They sang "Poor Old Joe." He was 
"Never quite exactly right but just 
a little slow. Poor old Joe!" 

Several new members have re- 
cently become active members of 
our Society. May the work of the 
Society continue to grow and im- 
prove. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



Franklin Literary Society 

The Frankins are happy on the way 

We are glad to say, 

Just come and see if you should 

doubt, 
And ere you go away 
You will truly say 
I've found it right. 

On the evening of Jan. 29 a very 
interesting program was rendered : 
Solo by Daniel Myers, Recitation by 
Esther Bair. Pantomime, America 
by Hannah Sherman and Ruth Min- 
nich. This was followed by sym- 
posium. Who was the greatest 
American Writer. Longfellow dis- 
cussed by Charles Young, Whittier 
by W'itmer Eshleman, Edger Allen 
Poe by Enos Weaver. The society 
as a whole feels she is doing as a 
noted man once said : "Impression 
without expression makes for de- 
pression." Those things with which 
we are impressed we express for 
our benefit and for others. 



Order is Heaven's first law. 



"You are writing a Gospel, 

A chapter each day. 
By deeds that you do. 

By words that you say. 
Men read what you write, 

Whether faithless or true. 
Say! What is the Gospel according 
to you?" 



Mr. Reber wonders where Mr. 
Ziegler is. Says to himself, "guess 
I'll go up to his room and see if 
he's there" — Starts up steps — Re- 
members the flitting and starts 
down again. 



Of two evils choose — neither. 



Contentment is better than riches. 



Time and tide wait for not man. 



Rust rots steel which iMe pre- 
serves. 



Water seeks its level, so do 
brains. 



Few men can endure great suc- 
cess. 



Work and note as you talk and 
pray. 



Think out your work, 
Work out your thoughts. 



Timidity is a coward — Speak up. 



Echoes of Penn Gazette 

(Compiled by Flavia Martz) 
A is for Amy so shy and so neat, 
B is for Bechtel who stepped on her 
feet. 

J is for John Zug a very fine chap 

He invested in a new commercial 
cap 

K is for Keeney, but he is not a 
weeny. 

L is for Lininger the oldest in the 
ranks, but has not been 
found out to be a crank. 

M is for Moyer a very fine cook 

She makes some fish that 
were caught with a hook. 

N is for Noah, now don't be in the 
dark; for he isn't the one 
that lived in the ark, 
etc. ad finis. 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Religious Notes 



Volunteer Band 

On Sunday evening Feb. 13th the 
Volunteers had charge of a very im- 
pressive service held in the college 
chapel. At this meeting the school's 
missionary service flag was dedi- 
cated. The flag which was placed 
above the pulpit consists of a black 
felt background, with the names of 
the countries in blue felt and gray 
crosses representing the individual 
missionaries. The crosses are six- 
teen in number representing former 
students and teachers now on the 
foreign field. A short talk was 
given by one of the volunteers on 
the lives of these missionaries after 
which Prof. Ober delivered an ad- 
dress. 

Bro. J. M. Pittinger (India) who 
was a teacher here sailed in 1904. 
His influence and inspiration while 
on the hill shall never be forgotten. 
Kathryn Ziegler is known to most 
of the people in the college district. 
She spent the year before her sail- 
ing for India at Elizabethtown. 

B. Mary Royer now home on a 
furlough is in school with us. We 
count it a rare privilege to have 
her associate with us in class-room 
and hall. 

Sara Replogle bid us goodbye in 
1919 while on her way to India. 

Nora Reber Hollenberg finished 
the pedagogical course in 1913. She 
is now studying the Indian langu- 
age. 

Henry L. Smith went to India 
under the Brethren in Christ Mis- 
sion Board. 



Bessie M. Rider, an alumna is 
serving in the Chinese hospital as a 
missionary nurse. 

I. E. Oberholtzer is also working 
in Ping Ting. 

Mary Schaeffer's smile is still re- 
membered oh the hill. She is located 
at the new Chinese station opened 
recently. 

Charles Shoop was sent to China 
under the United Brethren Board. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Graybill have 
been working in Sweden since 1911. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Glassmire 
who were at one time both students 
and teachers here are now in Den- 
mark. 

Emma Smith Climenhaga and 
Lester Myers have gone to Africa 
under the Brethren in Christ Board. 

May these missionaries be a chal- 
lenge to us to respond to the big- 
gest call that comes to us. 

On Feb. 13 the Band sent the Col- 
lege quartette to hold a service at 
the Harrisburg prison. They re- 
ported a good meeting. 

From Feb 25 to 27 the Student 
Volunteer Conference will be held 
at Lafeyette College, Easton, Pa. 
Elizabethtown will send a delega- 
tion of fifteen Volunteers. 

V. R. H. 



Echoes of Newville S. S. 

The interest of the members of 
the Newville Sunday School seems 
never to grow less, even though 
roads do get muddy, and cold, rainy 
days come. In the weeks just past 
the work has been taking on new 
life and interest. Each member 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



seems to feel that the success of the 
Sunday School rests on him in- 
dividually — as it does — and when 
that idea has spread through a 
school, keep your eyes open, and 
watch that school, for it is bound 
to grow. 

The attendance has been very 
good all winter. Our enrollment is 
forty-five at present, and we have 
an average attendance of about 
ninety per cent. They seem always 
eager. We may arrive there from 
fifteen to thirty minutes before time 
to open the school, but we always 
find the children there waiting and 
happy, eager to begin to sing. 
"Jesus Wants Me For a Sunbeam" 
is their favorite song and they are 
all shining little beams of happi- 
ness. 

The call to help in the Famine 
Relief came and it was discussed by 
the school. We then decided that 
on February sixth the offerings 
given at Sunday School in the af- 
ternoon, and at the preaching ser- 
vice in the evening be given to help 
this work. When that day came, 
and their gifts were brought to- 
gether the amount of the offering 
was Thirty-seven Dollars and forty- 
two cents. One little class of Junior 
boys and girls raised Thirteen Dol- 
lars for this offering. God alone 
knows of the sacrifices made and 
the motives that prompted the giv- 
ing, and we feel sure that He can 
bless the gift as he did the loaves 
and fishes given by the little boy to 
feed the multitude. 

To the superintendent and teach- 
ers each Sunday's service gives new 
inspiration and a larger vision of 
what is possible for Newville. With 



that larger vision comes also a de- 
termination to "do" and make some 
of our dreams realities, by God's 
help. E. K. Z. 



Stevens Hill Religious Activities 

The former ideas of an education 
were to get as much book know- 
ledge as you can and can as much 
as you get. What the world needs 
is men and women who are not 
only able to teach the fundamental 
subjects of the public school curri- 
culum but also those who are able 
to teach religion, thereby applying 
their education instead of keeping 
it. 

Stevens Hill offers a fine oppor- 
tunity for young men and women 
to apply their religious training. 
The Sunday School intefest is grow- 
ing by leaps and bounds both in 
spirit and number. The community 
was aroused by the constant prayer 
and writing efforts of the teachers 
as they met from Sunday to Sunday. 
The superintendents and teachers 
meet at the town church where some 
one from town meets them with an 
automobile and takes them to the 
church, where a great expression of 
welcome is shown upon their ar- 
rival. The teachers have been as- 
sisted in their work by the church 
furnishing them with sand tables 
and blackboards, which are a 
means of making practical applica- 
tions of the lesson to daily life. The 
Sunday School work is followed by 
preaching services every two weeks. 
At these services very inspiring and 
helpful sermons are preached which 
give the Stevens Hill people and 
teachers a new zeal to go forth to 
labor for the Master. J. R. S. 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



School Notes 



Washington and Lincoln 

Washington and Lincoln! 
Let us spread their fame, 

Each one for his greatness 

Born an honored name. 
Washington and Lincoln 
Wise and good and true, 

Wave them in their honor 

The Red and White and Blue ! 

Virginia Baker 



Real Affinities 

"Are you sure your tastes and 
Robert's are congenial? Anxiously 
inquired the fond mother of the 
newly engaged daughter. 

"O yes mamma,' replied the joy- 
ous young girl, "we are both fond 
of Browning and lemon pie and mo- 
toring." 



Paul Zug: The reason I got sick 
again was because I got up on Tues- 
day (ground hog day) turned on 
the light and saw my shadow and 
so I went back to bed again. 



Bro. John Heckman, member of 
Board of Trustees of Mt. Morris 
College preached a very instructive 
sermon to the student body quite 
recently. 



Mr. Lester Royer — No matter 
where I go, I can always find a 
Royer there and I can trace back 
our ancestry to Jonah. 



The ladies in the Ladies' Glee 
Club thank Mr. Miller who thinks 
the Ladies' Glee Club is so beauti- 
ful. 



On the evening of St. Valentine's 
day, Chapel and Commercial Hall 
were the scene of some social do- 
ings. A talking contest was en- 
gaged in also a heart contest, af- 
ter which refreshments were 
served. The room echoed with 
merry voices and everybody had a 
good time, if faces are a true index. 



Can You Hear Them? 

The Senior reception was held 
lately; it was enjoyed by all on the 
hill. The Seniors and the Faculty 
enjoyed the program, the under- 
graduates the noise. 



A. — I saw the tips of Miss ( ) 

ears. 

B.— Yes 

A. — I wonder whether it was an 
accident or whether ears are 
gradually coming back again. 



Mr. Meyer coming up the steps 
of Memorial Hall at a bound, sing- 
ing lustily — Starts up the hall to- 
ward tower room — Hears ladies 
voices — Turns and flees in a panic. 



Dr. Russel Conwell conducted 
our Chapel exercises the morning 
after he delivered his famous lec- 
ture in our town. His fitting re- 
marks were very impressive. 



Mr. Chester Royer would not 
climb a tree at night for fear of 
being suffocated by the C02 which 
the leaves give off. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



Athletic Notes 



The Girls' Game 

A few weeks ago the gym was a 
scene of much hilarity due to the 
girl's first appearance in a public 
basket ball game. During this 
period of merriment the Senior girls 
defeated the weighty quintet repre- 
senting the Juniors, by a score 3-0. 
Thus winning for themselves the 
enviable reputation of having 
played the first "shut-out" of the 
season. 

For twenty minutes these high 
spirited lassies battled thru a score- 
less tie. At this stage of the game 
Miss Hershey found it necessary to 
get a better "understanding" to 
keep apace with her usual stride. 
This she did by exchanging, for 
apair of one of her team-mates. The 
game was again resumed and 
whether the Juniors were admiring 
Miss Hershey's shoes or whether 
they wanted to see a pretty shot is 
hard to tell. However all stood in 
wonderment and saw her take a 
shot netting the first goal from the 
field. She soon followed with one 
from the foul line. 

The Seniors outclassed the 
Juniors at all stages of the game, 
but were unable to humble the 
weight of the mighty defensive 
which the Juniors presented. Miss 
Falkenstein played the best labor 
game for the Juniors while Beth 
played a "stunner" at her position 
as guard. 

The game was played with snap 
and was witnessed by a supporting 
bunch of rooters. 



The Boys' Game 

The Senior and Junior boys met 
for the third time, to play off a tie 
a few weeks ago. The Senior lads 
lacked their usual stride and fell 
before the mighty attack of the 
Junior tossers. The flying start of 
the Juniors and the absence of sev- 
eral "treasurers" from the rank of 
Senior rooters caused the Seniors to 
lose heart, being defeated by a 
score 34-8. 

Reds vs. Blacks 

Last week another stellar attrac- 
tion was staged when the girls 
made their second appearance in 
the gym. The sides were evenly 
matched and the game resulted in 
an evenly divided score. 

The Blacks were the first to score 
but the Reds soon followed. Dur- 
ing the whole game the score was 
continually being tied. 

When the final whistle blew the 
score was still tie. An extra five 
minute period was played but only 
resulted in each side scoring an- 
other field goal. The second extra 
period was played but with no re- 
sults. The game was then called 
off with a score 10-10. 

Miss Falkenstein scored all the 
points for the Blacks playing a good 
all round game. Miss Eberly played 
a good game as forward despite the 
close guarding game Miss Brubaker 
played. S. O. 



The seasoning agencies, pepper 
and salt, Bobbie Hart and Maria 
Fike. 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Alumni Notes 



Elma Blanck (nee Brandt) is a 
busy home builder in Manheim., Pa. 

C. J. Hanft, '05 is in the coal 
mining business in Bayard, W. Va. 

J. Mark Basehore, '20 is engaged 
in General Office work in Sebring, 
Fla. 

Charles Abele, '17 is now a stu- 
dent at Franklin and Marshall Col- 
lege. 

Emma S. Miller, '13 is engaged 
in City Mission Work in Chanute, 
Kansas. 

Clarence B. Sollenberger, '20 is 
teaching a Rural School near Carlr 
isle, Pa. 

Esther Kreps, '20 is in Nurses 
Training School, Bellevue Hospital, 
New York City. 

H. Bruce Rothrock, '07, is living 
in Lewistown, Pa., and is engaged 
as a steel worker. 

Henry B. Brandt, '14, is serving 
as a cost accountant in a Manheim 
Firm, Manheim, Pa. 

Isaac J. Oaks, '12, is a traveling 
salesman for the Reading Bone Fer- 
tilizer Co., Reading, Pa. 

Isaac Z. Hackman, '07 is em- 
ployed as a certified Public Ac- 
countant. He is located in Philadel- 
phia. 

Stella W. Buffenmyer, (nee Hof- 
fer), '07, lives in Uniontown, Pa. 
She is busy assisting her husband in 
Pastoral Work besides her ac- 
tivities as a busy mother. 

Bessie M. Brinser (nee Horst) 
'14 is living in Harrisburg, Pa., with 
her sister since the death of her 
husband. She is a stenographer in 
the State Highway Department. 



Martin S. Brandt, '08, is farming 
the Lane Crest Farm near Eliza- 
bethtown, Pa. He is especially in- 
terested in breeding Big Type Po- 
land China Hogs and Mottled An- 
cona Chickens. 

Fred W. Fogelsanger, '19 is en- 
gaged in farming and stock raising 
near Chambersburg, Pa. Mr. 
Fogelsanger, too, holds a very re- 
sponsible position in the Hampshire 
Swine Breeder's Co. 

Fellow Alumni, don't forget to 
return your questionnaire at once. 
The College Bulletin is waiting for 
those points of information. Sin- 
cerely yours, Alumni Editor in be- 
half of Elizabethtown College. 

H. K. Geyer, '16 and Naomi 
Geyer (nee Longenecker), '16 are 
located in Miamisburg, Ohio, in- 
stead of Fairbanks as noted in a 
former issue. Rev. Geyer is en- 
gaged in Pastoral service besides 
attending the Seminary in Dayton, 
Ohio. 



Great truths are portions of the soul 

of man, 
Great souls are portions of eternity 



If men loved larger, 
Larger were our lives; 

And wooed the nobler, 
Won they nobler wives. 



Lanier 



Yet after he was dead and gone 
And e'en his memory dim, 

Earth seemed more sweet to live 
upon, 
More full of love, because of him 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



27 



Feb. 19th the fourth number of 
the lecture course was given. Frank 
D. Logan the noted cartoonist ap- 
peared giving the "Scrap Book" a 
collection of pictures, scenes dear 
to our childhood, sketches from life 
and a miscellaneous group. Prob- 
ably the pictures of the seasons 
portrayed in "The Old Swimmin' 
Hole," "When the Frost is on the 
Pumpkin," the "Lake and Wood" 
and the "Snow Scene" were the 
most beautiful. His skillful in por- 
traying the pictures and his spicy 
humor made the evening pass very 
quietly and pleasantly. 

E. K.— S. O. 



Smile! 

Keep a smile on your lips; it is bet- 
ter 
With jubilant spirit to try 
For the end you will gain, than to 
fetter 
Your days with a moan and a sigh 
There are clouds in the firmament 
ever, 
The beauty of heaven to mar, 
Yet night so profound there is never 
But somewhere is shining a star. 
Nixon Waterman. 



On the Hill 

"Pardon, Prof. — Would you give 
a student a class cut for something 
he had not done?" 

"Certainly not, that would be 
unjust." 

"Then that's all right, I didn't get 
my reference work done." 



N. Meyer in biology — The C02 
becomes consecrated (concentrated) 
in the leaf and so tends to diffuse 
out. 



As the marsh hen secretly builds on 

the watery sod. 
Behold I will build me a nest on the 

greatness of God. 

Lanier. 



And the night shall be filled with 
music 
And the cares that infest the day 
Shall fold up their tents like Arabs 
And as silently steal away. 

Longfellow. 



Bro. Snayder, member of Board 
of Trustees of Blue Ridge College 
conducted our Chapel exercises 
Feb. 16. He and Bro. Miller from 
Md. gave us helpful suggestions. 



Mr. Bechtel to Mr. Sherman. I'd 
hate to go with a girl who goes with 
married men. 

Mr. Sherman to Mr. Bechtel: I'd 
hate to eat candy my girl got from 
another fellow. 



Truth forever on the scaffold 
Wrong forever on the throne 

Yet that scaffold sways the future 
And behind the dim unknown 

Standeth God within the shadow 
Keeping watch above his own. 

Lowell 



Take a word or two of kindness, 

Season well with some good deed. 
And of charity a plenty, 

And a hope of generous meed. 
And if you will mold them rightly, 

Which may be no easy thing, 
You will find you'll have a dainty 

Fit to serve any king. 
Mix with these a cup of wisdom, 

And a dash of self-control. 



28 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Darby Brand Canned Foods Are Quality 
Packed. Packed Exclusively For 

Comly, Flanigen & Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 

118 & 120 So., Delaware Ave., Phila. 

Ask Your Dealer For Darby Brand 
A Trial will convince 



A. B. DRACE 
PAINTER 

AND 

PAPER HANGER 



S. Market St. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



COLLEGE JEWELRY OF THE BETTER 
SORT 

J. F. APPLE CO. 

MANUFACTURING 
JEWELER 

College and Fraternity Pins, Rings, Med»U 
Prize Cups, Foot Balls, Basket Balls 

120 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. Box SW 

DR. S. J. HEINDEL & SON 

DENTIST 

Out-of-Town Friday each week 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

HEADQUARTERS FOR MAGAZINES 

Subscriptions and Counter Sales 

Best Display in County 

THE ROOT MAGAZINE AGENCY 

21 W. High St. Elizabethtown, Pa, 



FOR PHOTOGRAPHS 

CALL AT BISHOP'S 

New and Modern Studio 

Elizabethtown, Penna. 
We Guarantee All Work 

See us before having your diploma or those pictures framed. 

AMATEUR FINISHING SOLICITED 

EASTMAN LINE OF KODAKS AND FILMS FOR SALE 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



29 



Franklin & Marshall College 


Waterman Fountain Pens 

— AT— 


LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 


Offers Liberal Courses in Arts and Sciences 


Ream's Book Store 


Campus of 54 acres with ten building"- 
including Gymnasium and complete Ath- 
letic Field. 






For Catalogue apply to 


Y. M. C. A. BUILDING 


HENRY H. APPLE, D.D., LL.D., Pre.. 


LANCASTER, PENNA. 


GO TO 


H. H. GOOD 


HORST'S 


Gentral Meat Market 


CENTRE SQUARE 


FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 


for 






Bell Phone 31R4 


Oysters, Ice Cream, Confectionery 


ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 


GANSMAN'S 


LANCASTER SANITARY MILK CO. 


PASTURIZED MILK 


S. W. Cor. North Queen & Orange Streets 


AND 
CREAMERY BUTTER 


LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 






PURITY ICE CREAM 




North and Frederick Sts. 


Men's 


BOTH PHONES, LANCASTER, PA. 




Reliable Outfitters 


CLOTHING FOR THE MAN OR BOY 

Complete line of 


Suits to measure from $35 to $65 


SUITS & OVERCOATS 
Suits made to your measure. Men'* 


Ready made Suits for Young Men from 


furnishing a specialty. Best make of Shoes 


$25.00 to $35.00 


of all kinds for Men, Ladies and Children. 


Plain Suits Constantly on Hand from 


Agent for first-class Laundry 


$25.00 to $35.00 






J. N. OLWEILER 


One Price — Always the Lowest 


Near Centre Square Elizabethtown 



30 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



EAT 

Giinzenhaiiser's Bread 

Delivered by 

E. C. HEILMAN 

Opposite P. R. R. Station Elizabethtown 
Save Your Money by Bringing Your Shoes 

E. W. MILLER 

DEALER IN SHOE FINDINGS 

All Kinds of 

Rubbers and Shoe Repairing Neatly Done 

221 South Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, :-: :-: PENNA. 



LUMBER 

AND 

MILL WORK 



We saw timbers 80 ft. and longer an 4 
deliver a barn complete in a couple weeks 



B. F. Hiestand & Sons 



MARIETTA, 



PENNA. 



?OOOOOOOOOOOOOCX>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXXX}OOOOOOOCXX)00000« 

When In Need Of 

SHOES 

WHICH WILL GIVE YOU EXTREMELY LONG WEAR COME TO 

The W. A. Withers Shoe Co. 

OLD MARKET HOUSE BLDG. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Prompt, Careful Attention Given To Mail Orders 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



31 



QUALITY 

LEBANON 

BOLOGNA 

Made in the Most Modern and 

Sanitary Plant 
Manufacturing this Famous Product 



"MORRIS SUPREME" 

FOOD PRODUCTS 

Advertised and known over the 
Entire World 

THE LEBANON BOLOGNA 
and 

PROVISION CO. 

D. B. Buck, Secretary and Mgr. 

H. W. Buck, Distributor 



CLASS PINS AND RINGS 

For Colleges, High Schools, Sunday 
Schools, etc. Illustrated catalog mailed 
opon request. We are also Headquarters 
for Colleges and High School pennants. 
Let us know your wants. 

UNION EMBLEM CO. 
Dept. 89, Palmyra, Pa. 




FO U ifST^lLNfiP E N 




Imade on honor-buTltfor servTceI 



Base Ball and Lawn Tennis Good;- 

Foot Ball and Basket Ball Good* 

Sporting Goods Of All Kinds 

Books, Stationery and Office 

Supplies 

DUTEWEILER 

813 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, :-: PENNA. 



WHATEVER YOU NEED IN 

MERCHANDISE 

ALWAYS GO TO 

GREENBLATTS DEPT. STORE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 
IT WILL PAY YOU 



oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooexxxxx>oooooooc 

DEMY & DETRA 

Dealers in 

FARM IMPLEMENTS AND REPAIRS, HUBER TRACTORS, GASOLINE AND 
OIL ENGINES, HAND AND POWER PUMPS 



REPAIRING A SPECIALTY 



Bell p h ho n ne 6 W-R2 ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooi 



32 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Conducted on Sanitary Principles 

is the 

RALPH GROSS 

SHAVING PARLOR 

Agency for Manhattan Laundry 



THE BEST THERE IS IN 

HARDWARE 

At the Lowest Possible Price 
BOGGS* QUALITY HARDWARE STORE 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



LEHMAN & WOLGEMUTH 

COAL 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED and FLOUR 
BOTH 'PHONES ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



JOHN M. SHOOKERS 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 

Repairing a Specialty 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 



Kodaks & Films Stationery 

H. K. DORSHEIMER 

Confections Athletic Goods 



)OOOOOOOOOOOOGOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO< 

PIANOS-ViCTROLAS 

Musical Instruments of Every Description 
Our Line Is Complete 



32 Makes of Pianos, 40 Styles 

Victor, Cheney, Star, Franklin and Solotone Phonograph 
Popular Sheet Music 9c a Copy 



CASH OR EASY PAYMENT PLAN 



KIRK JOHNSON & CO. 

16-18 W. King Street LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 

•ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooJ 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



33 



GO TO 



GUY The BARBER 

HE'S ON THE SQUARE 

Kwick-Lite, Flashlights 

Kyanize, Floor Finish 



Joseph H, Rider & Son 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

FOR GOOD EATS CALL AT 

Mornafiifs' Restaurant 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

OYSTERS IN SEASON 

ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO VISIT 

HIRSH & BR0. 

Centre Square, LANCASTER 

for 

Ready-Made and Made-to-Order 

Clothing lor Men and Boys 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS 



We are one of the largest manufacturers of 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

in the United States 



Strictly One Price To All 

Established in 1854 



KIEFFER & LANDIS 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

Real Estate 

Insurance Collections 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



BOOKS BIBLES 

STATIONERY 

Phonographs 



I. A. SHIFFER 



39 S. Market St. 



Elizabeth town 



COLLE.GE. HILL DAIRY 

PURE MILK AND CREAM 

Delivered Daily 

S. G. GRAYBILL 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

H. H. BRANDT 

Dealer in all kinds of 
BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE AND 
ROOFING PAPER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



CENTRAL 
MUSIC STORE 



Victrolas, Grafonolas, Records, Stringed 
Instruments, Stationery, Kodaks, Eastman 
Films, Waterman Fountain Pens and 
Greeting cards. 

Films Developed and Printed 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



34 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



>O0000O0CXXX>OOOOOCX>OO0OOO0O000OOOO0OOO0O0O0OO00OO0O0000000000( 

H. C. Schock, President J. E. Longenecker, V. President 

H. N. Nissly, Cashier 

SECURITY PROGRESS 

UNION NATIONAL MOUNT JOY BANK 



MOUNT JOY, 



PENNA. 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus and Profits $264,000.00 

Deposits $1,324,871.00 

An Honor Roll National Bank, Being 421 in Strength in the United States and 

2nd in Lancaster County 

Resources $2,165,000.00 

All Directors Keep in Touch With the Bank's Affairs 

The Bank Board Consists of the Following: 

H. C. Schock Eli F. Grosh I. D. Stehman Christian L. Nissley 

J. E. Longenecker John G. Snyder J. W. Eshleman Johnson B. Keller 

T. M. Breneman Eli G. Reist Samuel B. Nissley S. N. Mumraa 

Rohrer Stoner 

WE PAY 4% INTEREST ON CERTIFICATES AND SAVINGS 



SCHMIDT 
BAKERY 



Harrisbui o. Pa. 



PRINTING 



For Schools, Colleges, Etc. is our hobby. 
The fact that we have a city equipped 
printing office in a country town, is suf- 
ficient evidence that we can do satis- 
factory work and last but not least, our 
prices are right. At present we are print- 
ing many monthlies for schools thruout 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This book- 
let is the product of our office. If the work 
appeals to you, get our price on your 
publication. 



The BULLETIN 

Jno. E. Schroll, Propr. 

MOUNT JOY, PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



35 



THE WILLEY COMPANY INC. 

Superior Laundry Machinery 



FACTORY COLUMBIA, PENNA. 



OFFICE PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



109 East King Street 




Lancaster, Penna. 



JACOB FISHER 

8 Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
WATCHMAKER & JEWELER 
With you for 40 years that's all 
From 10 to 20 per cent. lower than the 
lowest for the same grade of make. 




Seller's Kitchen Cabinet, the best ser- 
vant in your house. I have just received 
a half car load of above cabinets, which I 
will sell at Special reductions during Octo- 
ber and November. Call and see the Cabi- 
net, and get prices. 



H. S. HOTTENSTEIN, 
R. D. 2 ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



HERSHEY TRUST CO. 

HERSHEY, PENNA. 
Capital, Surplus and Profits $425,000.00 
Resources $3,500,000.00 
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 
M. S. Hershey, President 
W. H. Lebhicker, V. Pres. 
Ezra F. Hershey, V. Pres. 
S. C. Stechon, Treas. 
John A. Landis U. G. Risser, M.D. 

J. B. Leithiser John E. Snyder 

Wm. F. R. Murrie A. W. Stauffer 

Commercial Banking Department 
Saving Department Trust Department 

LARGEST CIRCULATION AND 
ADVERTISING PATRONAGE 

Elizabethtown Chronicle 

Fifty-one Years Old and Still Young 



Garrett, Miller & Co. 



Electrical 
Supplies 



N. E. Cor. Fourth & Orango St». 
WILMINGTON, -:- -:- DELAWARE 



36 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



^ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooc 

Hertzler's Department Store 

N. E. CORNER CENTRE SQUARE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 




Always Ready to Supply Your Needs Satisfactorily in 
DRY GOODS, STAPLE AND FANCY NOTIONS, BEST GROCERIES, FRUITS, 
SWEETMEATS, SHOES, WINDOW SHADES, QUEENSWARE, MEN'S 
WOMEN'S, BOYS' AND GIRL'S CLOTHING, OIL CLOTH, LINO- 
LEUM, CARPETS, RUGS, ETC. 

Goods displayed on three floors and separate carpet store, three doors 
east of Post Office. 

Agents for made to measure clothing — International Tailoring Co. of New 
York. 

We carry full stocks notwithstanding the great difficulty in obtaining 
goods at these high prices. 

Long experience in merchandising goe with prices of goods purchased here. 

HERTZLER BROS. 



>OQQOOOOOOQQOOQOOOOQOOQQOQQOQOOQOQOQQOOQQOQQOOQQQOOOOQOOOQOOG? 



JOdQOOOGeOOGOOOOOOOOOGOOOOOGOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOQOC 
J. Hoffman Garber Benj. F. Garber 

GARBER GARAGE 

Bell Phone 43R2 ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. Ind. Phone 605A 

AUTHORIZED 1 B mr|mjj]gS|5 ^ GENUINE 

SALES s^j ifcSSSS^SW W^ FORD 

and ^^ raSmUml i&r^ parts 

service j^S^um^^^^^Sa^a^^ ACCESSORIES 

Our Repair Department Is Complete with the Latest Ford Approved Machinery 
Ford Prices Used All Work Guaranteed 

oooooooooooooooooooooocxjoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooa 



o 



KLEIN'S 

Milk Chocolate 

Almond Bars 

"The Milkiest Kind of Milk Chocolate" 

OOOOQOOOQOOQOOOQOOOOOCQOOGGQOGOOOOOOQGOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCQ 

MUTH BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN 

COAL, FLOUR, FEED AND LUMBER 

Our Special Domino Feed 

We aim to give a square deal that will merit 
your trade and friendship 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENNA. 

OOQOQQOQOOOOQOQQOQOOQQQOQGGOQOOQOGOQOQOOOOQOOOOOOQOQOQOQOQOGGi 



|900000000000000000O0O0O0O00000OO0O0O0OOOOO00O7X)0OO000000000C$ 

Elizabethtown College 

The Homelike School 

Stands For 

HIGHER THINKING 

BETTER LIVING AND GREATER SERVICE 



8 

© 



High 
Ideals 

Excellent 

Christian 

Atmosphere 

All Virtues 

At a Premium 



IMPORTANT 



DR. CHUN'S LECTURE 
March 21, 1921 



HOMERIAN ORATORICAL 

CONTEST 

March 25, 1921 



JUNIOR ORATORICAL CONTEST 
April 22, 1921 



Strong 
Faculty 

Best 
Modern 
Methods 

Low 
Rates 



UPRIGHTNESS AND THOROUGHNESS REQUIRED 



OUR MOTTO 



u 



EDUCATE FOR SERVICE' 



If you are looking for a life-work or calling, if you are eager to be of the 
greatest service possible, don't fail carefully to consider the opportunities for 
service in the teaching profession. The touch of the teacher is eternal. The 
teaching profession is calling loudly for worthy young men and women to 
enter this depleted and yet greatest of professions. Elizabethtown College 
offers courses that prepare teachers for the Public Schools, High Schools, 
Colleges, Commercial High Schools, Business Colleges, Mission Fields, Music 
Fields, Bible and Religious Education. 

A TEACHERS' COLLEGE UNDER CLOSE AND CAREFUL CHRISTIAN 

SUPERVISION. 



ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



)300G0&QQOQQQQGO00OQQQ0OQOQOQ0QQQ0O0O0O00Q00Q0Q0O0QO0O000000C o 



MARCH 
1921 



AN IMPORTANT CHANGE DECIDED BY 

FACULTY 

Commencement one day earlier this year 

9:00 A. M. Wednesday, June 8, 1921 

Public Alumni Program 

8:00 P. M. Tuesday, June 7 

Alumni Luncheon 
5:00 P. M. Tuesday, June 7. 

Class Day Program 
2:00 P. M. Tuesday, June 7. 

Commercial Program 
8:00 P. M. Monday, June 6 

Baccalaureate Sermon 
7:30 P. M. Sunday, June 5 

Music Program 
8:00 P. M. Saturday, June 4 






swgw 



r 



SA/C i905g 



/>, 



00000(XXX}OOOOOOOOOCXXXXX}000000€X>CX3000000CX>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOeXdOO 




We Are Manufacturers of 

Doors and Window Frames, Doors and Sash, Mouldings, Dressers, Shutters and 

Blinds, Porch Work and Columns, Screens and Storm Sash, Hotbed 

Sash, Stair Work and Interior Finish 

And Dealers In 

Rough Lumber, Flooring and Ceiling, Fir Porch Flooring, Building Lime, Sand, 

Plaster, White Finish, Hydrated Lime, Brick, Cement, Asbestos, 

Asphalt, and Roll Roofing, Slate, Wall Board 

WE SPECIALIZE IN THE MANUFACTURE OF 

Shipping Cases and Tobacco Shooks 



We solicit your business and aim to give you prompt and satisfactory ser- 
vice on short notice. It is not necessary that we build for you in order to 
sell you the material; call to see us or 'phone when in the market for any- 
thing in our line and we shall be only too glad to give you our best service. 

Ask for our suggestions and we will cheerfully help you in planning your 
new buildings or remodeling your old ones. 

ELIZABETHTOWN PLANING MILL 



Bell Phone 3R5 
Independent 646A 



HOFFER BROS., Proprietors 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



o 



a 



O0<X)0O00OOO0O000OOO0OOOOOOOOOOO00OOOGO(XXXXXXXXKXX5OOOOO00O0CCi 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



o 

8 W. S. SMITH, President PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MaRTIN, Cashier 
U. S. DEPOSITORY 

ELIZABETHTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

o 

8 CAPITAL $100,000.00 

SURPLUS & PROFITS 144,000.00 



O General Accounts Solicited Interest Paid On Special Deposits 

O Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent 



8 DIRECTORS: 

§ W. S. Smith Elmer W. Strickler Peter N. Rutt 

§ F. W. Groff J. S. Risser B. L. Geyer 

g E. C. Ginder Amos P. Coble E. E. Coble 

o 
o 

O OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO f 



© fXJOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCX>OOOOOOOOC< 

I ELIZABETHTOWN EXCHANGE BANK 



o 



q Now Occupies Its New Bank Building 

O Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 

Q Fays Interest on Time Deposits 



g OFFICERS 

| A. G. HEISEY, President ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. 

g J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier 

§ I. H. STAUFFER, Asst. Cashier C. A. COBLE, Teller 

o 

DIRECTORS 

A. G. Heisey H E Landig B. H. Greider 

i Allen A. Coble „ ' M. K. Forney 

! H. J. Gish Geo.D.Boggs W . A. Withers 

| Jos. G. Heisey E - E - Hernley A c Fridy 

>ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooocx>ooooooo( 



o 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



.'K'S ■ ■; ■ 



t) I I H I I I 



imniiiHiiiii 



PLAIN 
CLOTHING 



WATT & SHAND 



Centre Square 



LANCASTER, PA. 



GEORGE S. DAUGHERTY GO. 

N. York-Chicago-Pittsburg 



Quality No. 10 fruits and vege- 
tables in No. 10 tins. 



DODGE BROTHERS MOTOR CARS 

R. H. FORNEY 

GARAGE AND REPAIR SHOP 

On North Market Street 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- -:- PENNA. 

CHAS. B. DIEROLF 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



PATRONIZE 

OUR 

ADVERTISERS 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SINCE THE DAYS OF THE GOLDSMITHS 

The goldsmiths of olden times, with whom banking had its be- 
ginning, undertook only to safeguard money and valuables en- 
trusted to their care. 

Banks have increased their activities since that time until they 
have become an indipensable factor in the finance and commerce 
of all civilized nations. 

The modern business man and woman who make full use of 
their bank looks upon it as an institution dealing in business in- 
telligence as well as money and credit. 

We invite business men and women to make use of all our fa- 
cilities for service. 

The Farmers' National Bank 

LITITZ, PENNA. 

S. W. Buch, President J. H. Breitigan, Cashier. 



KEYSTONE NATIONAL BANK 

MANHEIM, PENNSYLVANIA 

CAPITAL $ 125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS 165,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 1,500,000 

FOUR PER CENT. INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS 
ACCOUNTS LARGE OR SMALL SOLICITED 

OFFICERS 
John B. Shenk, President 
H. M. Beamesderfer, Vice-President H. A. Merkey, Teller 
J. G. Graybill, Cashier Norman Weaver, Clerk 

Clair H. Keen, Asst. Cashier Anna Shollenberger, Clerk 



H. M. Beamesderfer 
John R. Cassel 
Morris B. Ginder 



DIRECTORS 
Jacob G. Hershey 
J. B. Shenk 



R. O. Diehl 
John B. Hossler 
W. W. Moyer 



OUR TRUST DEPARTMENT CAN SERVE YOU AS 

Executor, Administrator, Assignee, Receiver, Guardian 
Agent, Attorney in Fact, Registrar 
OF STOCKS AND BONDS, ETC. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Trimmer's Great 
Bargain Emporium 

On the Square 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



Elizabethtown Roller Mills 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 
FLOUR, CORN MEAL AND FEED 



J. V. BINKLEY, Propr. 

402-404 South Market St. 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Pa. 



McLaughlin Bros. 
DRAYMEN 



LOCAL, LONG DISTANCE HAULING 
26 Washington Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
BELL PHONE 39-R2 

MARTIN 

READY-MADE AND MADE-TO-ORDER 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 

CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS AND SHOES 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



|OOOOOOOOOOGOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO$ 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MOUNT JOY, PA. 



Thomas J. Brown 
Jacob S. Carmany 
H. H. Myers 
Abraham L. Nissley 



directors: 

Gabriel Moyer 
Jos. B. Hostetter 
B. S. Stauffer 
Jno. W. Newcomer 
Amos N. Musser 



H. Roy Nissley 
Jacob N. Hershey 
E. S. Gerberich 
Henry H. Eby 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus & Profits. 



$150,000.00 



officers: 

THOMAS J. BROWN, President J. S. CARMANY, Vice President 

R. FELLENBAUM, Cashier 



4% Paid on Savings Accounts and Time Certificates. Resources $1,600,000 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SOUTH END GROCERY 

FRESH, FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES, CANDIES AND LUNCH GOODS 
"The little store with big business" 

Levi C. Hershey 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



A. W. CAIN 

DRUGGIST 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 

THE BETTER REPAIRING OF THE 

BARNES SHOE SHOP 

WILL GRATIFY YOU 

It's Real Economy 

43 South Market St ELIZABETHTOWN 

NISSLEY'S LUNCH & DINING ROOMS 

David D. Clare, Proprietor 

14-16 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER. PENNA, 



LANCASTER SCHOOL SUPPLY CO. 

L. B. Herr & Son 
Booksellers 

Stationeries 

Printers 

46-48 W. King St. LANCASTER, PA. 

THE GROSS 
CONFECTIONERY 

122 S. Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



BARD-BLANKENMYER CO., Inc. 



PLUMBING, HEATING 
and SHEET METAL WORK 



118 South Queen Street, 



LANCASTER, PA. 



GUNSMITH 



LOCKSMITH 



DOMN1TZ BROS. 

If it's a (LOCK) key, we have it 
222 }£ N. Q. St. LANCASTER, PA. 



A. C. McLANACHAN 
BARBER 

21 E. High St 

Second Door From Post Office 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



BUCH MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



WE BUILD THE FOLLOWING GOODS IN 

THE COLLEGE TOWN 



Wheelbarrows, Corn Shelters, Wood Saws, 
Land Rollers, Pulverizers, Water Troughs 



HENRY L. GISE 



Notary Public, Surveyor and Conveyancer 

Insurance of all Kinds 

Agent for 

State Capital Savings and Loan 

Association 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

J. W. G. Hershey, Pres. 

J. Bitzer Johns, V. Pres. 

Henry R. Gibbel, Sec. & Treat. 



The Lititz Agricultural 

Mutual Fire 

Insurance Company 



Insures against Lightning, Storm and Fir* 

Insurance in force $39,000,000 
Issues both Cash and Assessment Policies 



13 EAST MAIN STREET 
LITITZ, PENNA. 



PHONOGRAPHS 

We handle only one make and that is th* 

EDISON X7. Y a ? 

FISHER'S 

8 Centre Square 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



EBY SHOE COMPANY 

Incorporated 
Manufacturers of 

MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S 

FINE WELT AND TURNED 

SHOES 



LITITZ, 



PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



tOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO^ 

HEATING and PLUMBING 



Miller Pipeless Furnaces 

and 
Leader Water Systems 



LEO KOB 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

>QOOOOO<XXXXXXX>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO( 



J. W. ZARF088 

GENERAL HARDWARE 

Sporting and Housefurnishing 
Goods 



ELIZABETHTOWN. -:- PENNA. 

POTTS DEPARTMENT STORE 

"EPHRATA'S BIGGEST BEST STORE" 

EBERLY BROTHERS 
SHOES COAL 

Main & State S. State St. 



Ephrata, Pa. 



CHAS. K. MUSSER 



Electrical 
Contractor 

All Kinds of 

Electrical Supplies and Fixtures 

HOUSE WIRING A SPECIALTY 

The Ephrata Review 

$1.50 A YEAR 

Best Job Printing 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



Chas. S. Yeager, Propr. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXX}OOOOCXXXX>000000000( 



HIVE 




HIVE 



DEPARTMENT STORE 



OUR CREED 



We believe in the goods we are selling in our ability 
to get results. We believe that honest goods can be sold 
to honest people by honest methods. We believe in work- 
ing, not wasting; in laughing, no - ! crying; in boosting, 
not knocking; and in the pleasure of doing business. We 
believe that a man gets what he goes after; that a cus- 
tomer today is worth two customers tomorrow; and that 
no man is down and out until he has lost faith in himself. 
We believe in courtesy, in kindness, in generosity, in good 
cheer, in friendship, and in honest competition. We be- 
lieve in increasing our business, and that the way to do 
it is to reach for it. 



WE ARE REACHING FOR YOURS 



A. A. ABELE 



ELIZABETHTOWN. 

>0<X>000000000000<XXX)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOCX)OOCXXXXX)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOC}OOC 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Verses in Season 



Again 

Again the Spring ! Again the Easter 
lily! 
Again the soft warm air with 
odors rife ! 
Again the tender green on hill and 
valley: 
Again the miracle of risen life. 



St. Patrick's Green 

Oh, I love to see the shamrocks 
Boys wear March seventeen, 

And I love the girls green ribbons. 
And bits of evergreen. 

For they stand for brave St. Patrick 

So fearless and so good, 
Oh ! the Irish ought to love him, 

And everybody should ! 

Bertha E. Buch. 



Awakening 

Never yet was a springtime, 

Late though lingered the snow, 
That the sap stirred not at the 
whisper 
Of the south wind, sweet and 
low; 
Never yet was a springtime 
When the buds forgot to blow. 

Even the wings of the summer 

Are folded under the mold; 
Life that, has known no dying 

Is love's to have and to hold, 
Till sudden, the bourgeoning Eas- 
ter! 
The song! the green and the 
gold ! 

Margaret Sangster. 



A Calamity 

Now, March, there you are ! 
Just see what you did — 

You came with so much of a 
bluster 
Before February was out of the 
door, 
You set her just all in a fluster. 
The sweet winter pearls 
That she wore at her throat, 

Arranged in a beautiful cluster 
Were strewn, and there only re- 
main twenty-eight, 
And all because you made such 
a bluster! 

Julia M. Martin. 



Spring 

Though March, with wind and sleet 

is here — 
There's something better coming. 
dear : 
The snow's a melting every day. 
Jack Frost will soon be gone 
away. 

From out the earth, so bare and 
brown, 

Will peep the golden "Daffy-down" 
The violet and anemone 
Will bloom for everyone to see. 

While from the south, the land of 

sun 
The birds come winging, one by 
one; 
Each branch will bud. each bird 

will sing, 
And once again it will be spring. 
Winifred Griffiths. 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 









-^K. '" 


' •■'/£* 


'i 


r:^~ ■■'■?. 


if: 


<?■ 


f : 




'■'■'.%• 












ir-v 


. .'.f • ■ 




■ t \ '•'•'/.'•/ t 


'■:'; 




^ 




r~" 






i 




OV.v 


*\'s/' 


..*/ ••.;'.; *.; Jl 






'--. 


. > v 























K 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief. Jacob S. Harley 

Associate Editor Florence T. Moyer 

Departmental Editor H. H. Nye 

Alumni Editor L. W. Leiter 

Religious News- Editor Ezra M. Wenger 

^ Emma Ziegler 
School News [ 

S Stanley Ober 

'usiness Manager J. Z. Herr 

Circulation Manager E. G. Meyer 

Our College Times is published monthly during the Academic year of Elizabeth- 
town College. 

This paper will have to be discontinued as soon as the time of subscription expires 
as an action of the United States legislature. 

Please renew in time and report any change of address to the business manager. 

Subscription rates one dollar per year; fifteen cents per copy; six subscriptions 
$5.00 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



The editorial staff of the Col- 
lege Times are proud to represent 
the College community in this one 
branch of the school's activities, the 
issuing of a paper each month 
which shall be an exponent of the 
life we live here and which shall 
uphold the ideals we cherish. As 
this March number comes from the 
press we tender our personal greet- 
ings to fellow-students, to teachers, 
and to all the friends who are suf- 



ficiently interested to read the 
Times, and who are thus properly 
included within our circule. We have 
appreciated the generous support 
and encouragement given us in our 
humble efforts to serve. May the 
paper ever be a bond between the 
former dwellers on College Hill 
wheresoe'r they be and those now 
laboring within these halls eager to 
keep the honor of Alma Mater 
bright. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



Beginning a New Term 

The last third of the school year 
which we are just entering is pe- 
culiar to itself. Some have dropped 
out of the ranks; new schedules go 
into effect, spring events crowd 
thick and fast, sounds of music and 
oratory permeate the air about the 
campus, busy preparations for com- 
mencement fill all the days. Thj 
icy blasts from the Blue Mountains 
are tempered now into vernal 
breezes or even zephyrs, and with 
them at times come lassitude and 
a longing for the outdoors just 
when efforts should be most strenu- 
ous. How hard to keep one's mind 
on books, and problems, and themes 
when the general awakening of na- 
ture which characterizes this season 
invites to long hikes by the clear 
streams and, through the woods ! 
The plowman plods his cheerful 
way along the fresh furrow; and 
that tennis racket hanging on yon- 
der wall teases us. The spring term 
is like the last leg of a triangular 
course for a yacht race. Many a 
prize is won in the home stretch. 
In many respects the real test of a 
racer's mettle comes in the last lap. 
The past cannot be changed but 
lost fortunes may be retrieved. Be- 
tween this and Commencement is 
an unwritten page. It would be well 
to inscribe thereon a beautiful leg- 
end, make it an undying memory. 
Now, O aspirer to worth and pre- 
ferment, is the moment to draw on 
your reserve force, concentrate your 
energies, lay aside every weight 
and the love of ease and pleasure 
which so easily besets you, trust in 
God and keep your powder dry, 



and still, ever still look to the fu- 
ture and be wise. 

Easter 

Perhaps the severest test of a 
Christian's faith comes when he 
stands by the grave of the one he 
truly loves. The bereaved child 
cried in anguish, "Mother come 
back from the echoless shore." 
Christ is very precious to us because 
he is the first fruits of the resur- 
rection. 

And as we have borne the image 
of the earthy we shall also bear the 
image of the heavenly. 



Behold I shew you a mystery; we 
shall not all sleep, but we shall be 
changed in a moment, in the twink- 
ling of an eye, at the last trump ; for 
the trumpet shall sound, and the 
dead shall beraised incorruptible, 
and we shall be changed. 

For this corruptible must put on 
incorruption, and this mortal must 
put on immortality. 

So when this corruptible shall 
have put on incorruption, and this 
mortal shall have put on immor- 
tality, then shall be brought to pass 
the saying that is written, Death is 
swallowed up in victory. 

O death, where is thy sting? O 
grave, where is thy victory? 



But thanks be to God, which 
giveth us the victory through our 
Lord Jesus Christ. 
Then let .us daily onward press 

With noble pure desire, 
To grander heights, to wider fields. 

Still higher! ever higher! 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Symposium after the Manner of the 
Greeks 

Each of the following paragraphs 
is the summary of an impromptu 
speech given during the Freshman 
English recitation hour one morning 
recently. Guess for yourself the 
subject of each talk: 

To-day, instead of finding our 
people going to the churches and 
Sunday Schools we find them at 
places of amusement, at shows and 
dances. The enforcement of the 
blue laws seems the only thing to 
do. The conditions existing in the 
large cities indicate that the world 
is growing worse, yet who can im- 
agine how much good is done by 
men like Robert Speer, Dr. Wiler, 
and John R. Mott. 

Margaret E. Oellig. 

Women in this age have much 
better chance to develop than 
women of earlier times. They can 
learn at school about cooking and 
household duties. If they want to 
be teachers they can learn the prin- 
ciples of psychology and of child 
life. They have the suffrage and 
have a chance to help rule the 
world as they think it should be 
ruled. In fact, women of this age 
are almost on the same level with 
men along all lines. 

Ruby K. Oellig. 

One kind of reading that I enjoy 
is fables. They have a moral. In 
reading for pastime I prefer fiction, 
although all fiction does not have a 
moral. Pollyanna is an example of 
good fiction. The moral appeals to 
all girls. Who would not want to 
be a Pollyanna? 

Mary M. Henning. 



Music is the art practiced most 
but talked about least. It does not 
require an education on the tech- 
nical side to enjoy good music if we 
lisen intelligently. One writer says 
that music it to the soul what air is 
to the body; so we see that music 
is recognized as practically the 
highest art. The Bible tells us that 
in Heaven there's music, and 
Christ's birth was heralded by 
angels singing. With these facts in 
mind, I think we should aim at a 
strong music course on the Hill, 
with plenty of it in our literary pro- 
grams. Anna Brubaker. 

Because some schools go to ex- 
cess in the matter of intercollegiate 
athletics is no reason why we 
should keep out altogether; else 
why do we not stay out of the 
world since it is corrupt. The na- 
tion is benefited by athletics be- 
cause by means of athletics the na- 
tion's better grade of manhood is 
developed. The practice of athletics 
benefits the individual because it 
strengthens the body and lifts all 
who participate in it to a higher 
moral and intellectual plane. 

A. T. Moyer. 

At school many friendships are 
formed which will never be for- 
gotten. We should not associate 
with one person all the time and 
slight the others but we should be 
congenial toward all. Feeds on the 
hall cement friendships. We en- 
joy them better because we have 
prepared them ourselves. Every 
boy that was able was at the ban- 
quet on Thursday night. The toasts 
we give upon these occasions are 
helpful; we should exercise in this 
way frequently. It will mean much 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



in after life to be able to think on 
one's feet. 

Aldus Rinehart. 

Religion is of great importance in 
every one's life. Christianity im- 
parts the highest type of real cul- 
ture. It is difficult for a school to 
map out a religious program for all 
students; some are Christians, some 
are not. But it is the business of 
those students who are Christians 
to show the others that there is 
something worth while in the Chris- 
tian life. Stella Walker. 

In order to have a well-rounded 
education we must include both 
science and literature. Literature 
makes keen our appreciation, helps 
us to live better among men, and is 
one of the cornerstones of science. 
On the other hand, no matter what 
our specialty may be there must be 
some science in it. In formulating 
our knowledge, even our knowledge 
of literature, there must be a 
scientific basis. We find then that 
what we learn should be retained 
according to a philosophic and 
scientific system, and what we write 
should be expressed in literature. 

Lamen Beck. 

When I think of my high school 
experience I recall that it was pleas- 
ant to go to some of the classes and 
receive instruction. Some of my 
teachers had wonderful personality. 
We had great times at class meet- 
ings and when we took hikes. The 
friendships formed and the training 
received have been very valuable to 
me and will help me through life. 
Elizabeth Kreider. 

The experiences one receives 
while directing a Sunday School are 
varied and pleasant. The assist- 



ance of an able corps of teachers 
makes the work enjoyable. Some 
of the pleasant sensations one re- 
ceives come when nearly all the 
pupils attend on a rainy Sunday, or 
when at a special service the people 
of the village turn out. However, 
we invite you all out to Newville to 
see for yourselves. 

Stanley Ober. 

It is altogether necessary that 
there be restriction in the matter of 
social privileges at a school where 
there is a mixed student-body, es- 
pecially where some of the students 
are young. However, a distinction 
should be made between college 
and academy students. College stu- 
dents should be granted more social 
privileges. If students were put on 
their honor they would have much 
more respect for the school. There 
is no danger that if put on their 
honor when attending a lecture or 
during social hour they would dis- 
grace the school; on the countrary, 
it would be a step in advance be- 
cause it would be proving the ideals 
the school is trying to maintain. 

Daniel Harshman. 



The Frightened Ghost 

About fifty years ago there was 
an old house located about fifteen 
miles from my home. Although it 
was in good condition and well fur- 
nished, no one would live in it. It 
was supposed to be haunted. Men 
had been offered money to sleep 
just one night in this house but no- 
body had been found who would try 
it. 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Page of Recipes 



One day about five or six men 
said that they would spend the 
night in the house. Accordingly 
they planned how they would pass 
the time. They decided to while 
away the hours in card playing and 
drinking. So they supplied them- 
selves with the necessary articles 
and set out for the house, deter- 
mined to hold the fort till morn- 
ing. They reached the place, went 
in, and enjoyed themselves for a 
few hours. 

A man in the neighborhood who 
had heard that these men intended 
to spend the night in the supposed 
haunted house had decided to have 
some fun at their expense. So he 
had gone to the house before the 
other men arrived, provided him- 
self with a log-chain, and sat on 
the top garret step to wait for the 
arrival of the men. 

The latter were intensely inter- 
ested in the card game when the 
rr.an in the garret started down the 
bare steps dragging the chain after 
him. The men left bottles and cards 
and fled in terror from the house. 
But now came the turn of the ghost 
to be frightened. Unnoticed by him- 
self the hook on the end of the 
chain he was dragging caught the 
bail of a large wooden bucket that 
was filled with walnuts and was 
standing on the stairway. The wal- 
nuts came rolling down the steps 
while the basket came thump, 
thump, thump close upon his heels. 
He dropped the chain and ran af- 
ter the other men calling for help. 
He was the victim of his own prank. 



Select Thoughts on Idleness 

"The way to be nothing is to do 
nothing." 



tue, 



"Idleness is the sepulcher of vir- 



"Idleness is only the refuge of 
weak minds, and the holiday of 
fools." 



"If you are idle you are on the 
way to ruin, and there are few stop- 
ping places upon it." 



"Laziness grows on people; it be- 
gins in cobwebs and ends in iron 
chains." 



"Fortune may find a pot, but your 
own industry must make it boil." 



"Like the bee, we should make 
our industry our amusement." 



"Nothing is denied to well-di- 
rected labor; nothing is ever to be 
attained without it." 



"The more we do the more we 
can do; the more busy we are the 
more leisure we have." 



"A man who is able to employ 
himself innocently is never miser- 
able. It is the idle who are 
wretched." 



"I look upon indolence as a sort 
of suicide ; for the man is efficiently 
destroyed, though the appetite of 
the brute may survive." 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



"What men want is not talent; it 
is purpose ; in other words, not the 
power to achieve, but the will to 
labor." 



"The darkest hour in the history 
of any young man is when he sits 
down to study how to get money 
without honestly earning it." 



"Indolence is the dry rot of even 
a good mind and a good character; 
the practical uselessness of both." 



"Industry keeps the body 
healthy, the mind clear, the heart 
whole, and the purse full." 



"If you have great talents, in- 
dustry will improve them; if but 
moderate abilities, industry will 
supply their deficiencies." 



"Employment, which Galen calls 
'Nature's physician,' is so essential 
to human happiness that indolence 
is justly considered as the mother 
of misery." 



"Idleness is an inlet to disorder 
and makes way for licentiousness. 
People who have nothing to do are 
quickly tired of their own com- 
pany." 



"He that rises late must trot all 
day, and shall scarce overtake his 
business at night, while laziness 
travels so slowly that poverty soon 
overtakes him." 



"It is undoubted truth that the 
less one has to do the less time one 
finds to do it in. One yawns, one 
procrastinates, one can do it when 
one will, and therefore one seldom 
does it at all ; whereas those who 
have a great deal of business must 
buckle to it; and they always have 
time enough to do it." 



One bad habit will break down a 
man's character enough to admit 
another. 



If errand-running be your part 
Raise errand running to an art. 



Honesty is the best policy; but a 
man who is honest only through 
policy cannot be depended on to re- 
sist very much temptation. 



In zeal to run, forgetting how to fly, 
The Ostrich gained the earth but 
lost the sky. 



Honest toil is Holy Service. 
Faithful work is praise and 
prayer. 

Henry Van Dyke. 



The greater the difficulty the 
more glory in surmounting it. 

Skillful pilots gain their reputa- 
tions from storm and tempest 
Epicurus. 



The beauty of our faith is that it 
can be successfully lived. 

It works, and it works better than 
anything else offered. 

Chas. Reynolds Brown. 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Departmental Notes 



SCHOOL OF FINANCE AND 
COMMERCE 

You Can Because You Will! 

Your place in the World depends 
not upon circumstances but upon 
you. Whether you will give orders 
or only take them: whether your 
pay will be wages or salary: 
whether you will attain a high posi- 
tion in the work of your choice — all 
this depends upon your determina- 
tion. Every man that wills it can 
be a success. 

The market for untrained help 
grows narrower with every inven- 
tion of a labor saving machine and 
with every "examination" for safe- 
guard adopted by state or em- 
ployers. The laws of the state de- 
mand trained men — persons quali- 
fied to answer satisfactory the 
worlds question. What can you do? 
Every business office demands the 
keeping of books, rapid and correct 
figuring, writing of a neat business 
hand, the filling in of contracts and 
other legal documents, shorthand 
and typewriting. Young men, young 
women, can you do these things for 
which the business world offers to 
pay handsomely. 

The estimate one places on him- 
self is usually shown by what he is 
willing to spend on his education. 
It is at business that you may make 
your living. Why not prepare for 
it by enrolling with us in one of our 
advanced courses, the Complete 
Commercial Course or College Com- 
mercial Course. J. Z. H. 



Standards in Speech 

A magazine entitled "Correct 
English" edited by Josephine Turck 
Baker of Evanston, 111., has ap- 
peared among the papers on file at 
the College reading room. Eminent- 
ly practical and with a worthy 
ideal, this paper deserves a place 
among the periodicals of every col- 
lege. It is brimful of pointed sug- 
gestions that can be picked up in a 
moment, so clear and simple that 
he who runs may read. There are 
drill exercises for the purpose of 
distinguishing parts of speech, ex- 
ercises that impress upon the mind 
the proper pronouns to use after 
prepositions, instructions how to 
choose betwen "so" and "as" and 
between "in" and "at" before 
names of places, and definite ans- 
wers to numerous questions of 
grammar and rhetoric sent in no 
doubt by business men, teachers, 
writers, and professional men. The 
ideals of "Correct English" are in 
harmony with a wide-spread move- 
ment to preserve and transmit in all 
its dignity, purity, and strength the 
Anglo-Saxon speech. 

J. S. H. 

Social Science 

The Class in t Educational So- 
ciology has, at this writing, just 
completed a social survey of the 
school. Since the present view point 
in education is preponderantly so- 
cial, a course of this kind should 
contribute great value to the teach- 
er's work. The viewpoint that is 
borne in mind throughout the sub- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



ject is the question as to how the 
school may play the largest part in 
social betterment. Special empha- 
sis is placed upon social activities of 
the school, a course of study inter- 
preting human life, a socially-mind- 
ed teacher, and a socialized method. 
During the Spring Term a class in 
Rural Sociology will be organized. 
]n the light of our present social 
problems which are the fruits of the 
great Industrial Revolution of the 
nineteenth century, students of so- 
ciology are feeling the need of try- 
ing to make the country a more 
agreeable place in which to live. 
There has been a great migration 
away from the country to the city. 
"What can be done to reverse the 
tide toward the farm? What can 
be done to create new and lively 
interest in country life?" These are 
the burning questions of this new 
subject. This Great change must 
largely come to pass thru a changed 
socialized rural school. We must 
strive to eliminate an unwholesome 
ideal that it is dishonorable or 
humiliating to teach in the rural 
school. Shall there be greater joys 
in Country life? Teachers, will 
you help to bring these to pass? 

H. H. N. 

Mathematics 

The subject in the curriculum 
which expresses the most funda- 
mental principles in the universe is 
Mathematics. When man first be- 
gan to explore his world and to ar- 
range its facts in logical order he 
did so in some order, and his ar- 
rangement took on definite form. 
Mathematics deals with the funda- 
mental relations of form and 



magnitude. As man studied these 
relations and phenomena, other 
subordinate relations were discov- 
ered. So the science of Mathemat- 
ics grew and after awhile subdivi- 
sions were made. Thus we have the 
science of number, or Arithmetic ; 
the science of extension, or Geom- 
etry, etc. Each of these has been 
subdivided as research went on in 
their different phases and as facts 
accumulated and principles were 
discovered. The subject of Mathe- 
matics as found in our school cur- 
ricula in this way represents the 
sum total of man's discoveries and 
investigations of the fundamental, 
universal relations of form and 
magnitude. I. S. H. 

Music Department 

The Piano Recital given by Miss 
Mundorf, on Friday night February 
the twenty-fifth, was a decided suc- 
cess. Miss Mundorf was a student 
at Peabody Conservatory for seven 
years and is now successfully teach- 
ing in the city of York, Pennsyl- 
vania. She has excellent technique 
and played with a brilliant style. 
The following is a copy of the pro- 
gram : Coppriccio-Brilliante, for 
two pianos-Mendellsohn, Misses 
Mundorf and Royer; Open the 
Gates, Knapp, Mrs. Via; Rustle of 
Spring, Sinding, To Spring and Noc- 
turne, Greig, Butterfly, Serenata, D' 
Albert, Valse, Chopin, Miss Mun- 
dorf; The Blessed Damosel, Bliss, 
Mrs. Hoffer; Good-bye, Tosti, Mrs. 
Via; Arabesque in Form Etude, 
Leschestitsky, Waterlily and Con- 
cert Etude, Macdowell, Miss Mun- 
dorf. 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



On Saturday night, April the 
thirtieth, at eight o'clock, the 
Chorus Class will render a Dra- 
matic Cantata entitled, "Saul, King 
of Israel." The story of Saul, as 
King of Israel is beautifully por- 
trayed in solos, duets, trios and 
choruses. Everybody is invited. 
The Cantata will be given in Mar- 
ket Hall. 

The value of music is generally 
recognized. Music is the only thing 
that is used at all times and on all 
occasions. The man who traffics in 
wordly amusements knows its 
worth. The military leader rec- 
ognizes its influence in quieting, 
and enthusing his men. Since the 
beginning of time man has associ- 
ated music with religion. Even 
before man, the Morning Stars sang 
together; so the art of singing is 
heaven-born. It is a point of contact 
between thaL Christian and non- 
Christian. The world's greatest 
evangelists attribute the success of 
the work as much to the song- 
leader as to the preacher. 

Since our church uses vocal 
music, seldom accompanied by an 
instrument, the requisites of a song- 
leader are even greater than in 
those churches where accom- 
panists are employed. 

Are our young people getting 
that necessary training? Are we 
giving sufficient thought and energy 
to this particular field of our 
Church Work? 

J. V. 



ATHLETICS 
Basket Ball 

The final game of Basket Ball 
came before its schedule. Or per- 
haps the warm weather can's 
before its schedule. Several weeks 
ago we had another good game. 
One-sider as the score is the teams 
were evenly matched but evidently 
the losers were off, at least they 
were completely outplayed by the 
winners. 

Eshleman played a winning 
brand of ball all thru the fray. He 
and Zendt dazzed their guards with 
their passing. D. Myers* was the 
lone scorer for his delegation. The 
final score was 30-5. The lineup : 

Myers forward Zendt 

Raff forward Ober 

Moyer centre. . . . Eshleman 

Sherman guard Reber 

Harshman ....guard Bechtel 

Field Goals — Zendt 6, Eshleman 
5, Reber, Myers, Ober. Foul Goals 
— Myers 3-8, Zendt 1-3, Ober 5-6. 
Referee Hoffer. 

Baseball 

The balls are flying thick and fast 
and the curves are of the first-class. 
The old balls all fell to a "cover- 
less," fate from the bats of the hard 
hitting semi professionals. One lone 
bat and a crack in that survives to 
tell the tale. 

But wait till the new "pills" and 
"willows" come, and Uncle John 
renovates the field, then a brand of 
ball only excelled by the best will 
be "pulled off" when ever weather 
conditions permit. 

S. O. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



Literary Society Notes 



Homerian Literary Society 

The Homerian Literary Society 
has been accused of "lacking pep" 
by the other societies, but their 
programs are growing in interest as 
is seen not only in past programs 
but in those planned to be given the 
next few weeks. You cannot afford 
to miss our programs. 

On Feb. 18 a patriotic program 
was rendered. The main feature 
on this program was a debate. Miss 
Walker and Mr. Royer gave a live 
discussion on the personal char- 
acter of Washington and Lincoln. 
Feb. 25th Mr. Sherman gave us 
some good reasons why we should 
choose Elizabethtown College. Ev- 
eryone especially enjoyed the se- 
lections of the mixed quartette. 

Our public program was given 
March 5. Mr. Brightbill in his dis- 
cussion on "Will the Homerian 
Literary Society Live" expressed 
the belief of the members when he 
said that "it will live ." After his 
talk a quartette sang "Long Live 
Homerian." Lines on my Mother's 
picture" read by Miss Emma 
Ziegler showed good interpretation 
and was well given. All thorough- 
ly enjoyed the Critique, the So- 
ciety's Monthly. 

The Penn Literary Society 

On Saturday night, February 
26th the Penn Society gave a public 
program in honor of William Penn, 
after whom our Society was named. 
The following program was ren- 
dered : Music by the Male Quar- 
tette, Biography of William Penn 



by Anna Gruber, Literary Gems 
from Penn, Esther Leister; Piano 
solo by Elizabeth Thomas, Penn So- 
liloquy by John Bechtel, Discussion. 
William Penn as a founder and or- 
ganizer, Laura Frantz ; Pantomime 
by Floy Schlosser. 

One of the members of the so- 
ciety represented William Penn, 
and took an active part in the pro- 
gram, which made it very inter- 
esting. This William Penn seemed 
very well pleased with the work of 
the society, which of course, gave 
us great encouragement. Let us 
strive onward with the purpose of 
conquering all things. 
Labor Conquers All Things 

This is our motto true, 
And any labor here or there 

We're always glad to do. 

We're just one of the three 

Societies on the Hill, 
But we can very well fill our place 

By working with a will. 

We love the Green and Gold, 
Which are our colors bright, 

And we will honor them always 
By doing what is right. 

We're young, but we are growing. 
• And as all things must begin. 
We're not in the least discouraged, 
For Labor will Conquer all 
Things. 

Franklin Literary Society 

The members of the Franklin 
Literary Society feel that they are 
greatly benefited by their work in 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



the Society. Every one enjoys the 
work and strives to reach the high- 
est standard by keeping our Motto 
in mind, which is "Onward and up- 
ward." This surely can be done. On 
the evening of March the twelfth 
the following program was ren- 
dered : Quartette by Grace Ober, 
Anna Enterline, Daniel Meyers and 
Clarence Holsopple ; A paper "Ex- 
plain the Meaning of Thrift" by Ira 
Brandt; Recitation, "Practicing 
Thrift" by Velma Fike ; A paper 
"Why Should Each Boy or Girl 
Have an Allowance and How 
Should the Allowance be Spent" by 
Daniel Meyers; Recitation, "Life 
Leaves" by Leah Whistler. This 
was followed by a paper "The Ad- 
vantage of Keeping a Personal Ex- 
pense Account" by Ammon Gettel ; 
"The Franklin Review" by Mary 
Hykes; Piano Trio by Ruth Min- 
nich, Anna Enterline and Maud 
Nolt. Several new members have 
recently become active members of 
our Society. May the work of our 
Society continue to prosper. 

E. M. B. 



School Notes and Personals 



If your faith in God is stronger 
for every humble task in which you 
need and get his aid, then that hum- 
ble task is necessary for the fullness 
of your faith ki God. 

Philip Brooks. 



For good you are, and bad, and 
like to coins, some true, some light; 
But every one of you stamped with 
the image of the king. 

Tennyson. 



(Continued from page 23) 
Miss Hershey while carrying a 
motion — Well I guess the thing is 
dead then. 



We were very sorry to learn that 
Miss Eberly's illness did not permit 
her to return from her home to the 
hill several weeks ago. And we are 
especially sorry that she was so 
great a distance from her attending 
physician Dr. A. T. Moyer. 

The Boys again demonstrated 
their ability to "do things" last 
Thursday night when their associa- 
tion held their banquet in the dining 
room. The chicken and waffles 
hastily disappeared, to the melo- 
dious strains of the victrola, after 
which many spicy toasts and witty 
jokes were given. When the proper 
time came Prof. Hoffer dismissed 
the assembly with prayer. 

E. Z.— S. O. 



The anniversary of organization 
of the Keystone and Homerian So- 
cieties will be held this year in the 
College chapel April 8th at 8 p. m. 
An attractive program will be ren- 
dered. All alumni and friends are 
invited. 



Before and After 

"Do you know what it is to go 
before an audience?" 

"No. I spoke before an audience 
once, but most of it went before I 
did." 

The Christian Advocate. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



Religious Notes 



Persecution 

Christ commanded his disciples 
to go and witness for him and he 
also promised his Holy Spirit to 
guide them, but he did not say that 
they would have not difficulties and 
that they would escape the re- 
proaches of the world. To witness 
for Christ every day requires utter- 
ly unselfish service, and even death. 
There are times when progress de- 
mands the cheerful payment of a 
cost. Every Christian citizen of the 
world must gird himself for this 
struggle and enter the contest each 
day with fortitude and sacrifice. 

When we think of Christ and 
how he was bruised and how he 
died for us, it should not be hard 
for us to under go a little persecu- 
tion for His sake. He gave his life 
not for His own iniquities, for he 
had no iniquities. He died for our 
sins and certainly we would not 
shrink from doing anything for His 
sake. Have we who call ourselves 
christians, really paid the price of 
that name? Branded, speared, 
poisoned, stoned, crucified, morally 
tempted — converts have had to 
meet the cost of being christians. 
Have we met any of these to test 
our Christianity or have we dodged 
them in our path. 

If we have not been persecuted, 
we have not been challenging the 
world. We have not been standing 
for God. 

A young christian soldier in the 
army was often assaulted by his 
tentmates while at prayer at night. 
He sought advice of his chaplain, 



and by his counsel omitted his usual 
habit. His ardent heart could not 
endure this. He choose rather to 
have prayer and persecution then 
peace without it and resumed his 
old way. The result was, after a 
time, all his companions knelt in 
prayer with him. In reporting to his 
chpnlain; he said, "Isn't it better to 
keep the colors flying?" 

It always pays to be sincere to 
God, who has been and always will 
be true to us. We need not be 
afraid and joy, even in persecution, 
is promised us if we are truer 

It is right that one should with 
steady gaze count the cost of being 
a Christian. Yet the notable fact 
is that experience has proved that 
those w T ho have most truly paid the 
cost have been least conscious of 
the sacrifice. In comparison with a 
great goal and a high purpose, 
sacrifice is nothing. In spite of dif- 
ficulties, hardships and trials, the 
life spent for others is even here 
and now infinitely more rich and 
significant than a selfish life can 
possibly be. The Christian knows 
that selfishness is an enevitable 
limitation of life and love just as 
inevitably is its' enlargement. 

In his "Hunting for the Night- 
ingale in England," John Burroughs 
tells of listening one black night to 
the song of the sedge warbler in the 
hedge. It was a singular medley of 
notes, burried chirps, trills, calls 
and warbles. When it stopped sing- 
ing, a stone flung into the brush set 
it going again, its song now being 
persistently aminated to fill the 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



gloom and darkness with joy. 
Samuel Rutherford's most gladsome 
letters are those from his prison. 
The saints have sung their sweetest 
when the thorn had pierced their 
heart. 

We were told about a mother, 
with three sons killed in battle, who 
with radiant face gave her fourth 
to face wounds and death at coun- 
try's call. Why, then, should a 
christian mother flinch from allow- 
ing her child to make a peaceful 
journey overseas to under take con- 
structive work of exceptional scope 
and power for the highest of world 
enterprises? If it was not waste 
for the flower of our colleges to die 
for democracy, is it waste for the 
best to live for the extension of 
that which alone can make de- 
mocracy safe? We have been liv- 
ing at a time when men saw that it 
is the quality of life, not quantity, 
that really matters; when death 
was but an incident in the great fact 
of eternal life ; when the very in- 
difference to human flesh made men 
assurd that there was something 
vastly more. 

By all means, let us be ready to 
pay he cost of being a christian, but, 
let us not be over conscious of the 
cost. What the noblest minds crave 
is not recognition of their sacrifice, 
but that the cause for which they 
suffered shall be upheld and car- 
ried forward. Let us then rejoice 
that we can endure persecution for 
His sake. 

Doings of the Volunteers 

The following deputation teams 
were sent out Messrs, Baugher, 



Meyer, Royer and Wenger to Dau- 
phin County Prison during the 
month of February: Quartette se- 
lections were sung and an evan- 
gelistic sermon preached; On Mar. 
6 the following rendered a pro- 
gram in the Harrisburg Church. 
Misses Martha Martin, B. Mary 
Royer, Vera Hackman and Mr. 
Grant Weaver. On March 13 
Misses Nies, Hackman and Eliza- 
beth Zeigler gave a program at 
Lebanon and at the Midway 
Church. 

Over the week end Feb. 25-27 
fifteen Volunteers had gone to the 
Student Volunteer Convention, held 
at Lafayette College, Easton, Pa. 
They reported a good inspiring 
Convention and came back with 
ambition and eagerness to do more 
work for the Master. Such Con- 
ventions are a good thing for they 
are a means of bringing the stu- 
dents from different colleges to- 
gether and of strengthening the 
purposes of the Volunteers. Next 
years conference for the Eastern 
section of Pennsylvania and New 
Jersey will be held at Princeton 
Theological Seminary, Princeton, 
N. J. 

Recent Local Bible Institute 

Professors I. S. Hoffer and H. H. 
Nye conducted a Bible Institute, 
over the weekend Feb. 25-27 at 
Ephrata. 

Over the weekend Mar. 11-13 
Professors L. W. Leiter and A. C. 
Baugher conducted an Institute in 
the York church, York, Pa. 

Both of the Institutes were re- 
ported to be successful. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



School Notes and Personals 



Miss Reber- 
with the bells. 



-My watch ringo 



Student — Did you get a hair cut? 
Brightbill — No I got them all cut. 



Miss Royer to Ann — Are you 
working on "Saul" now? 
Ann — Yes. 



Miss Grosh talking in telephone 
— I have something else to do be- 
sides before. 



Mr. Sherman (in psychology) 
The Bible is divided into three parts 
first is the story of the recreation. 



Peg just loves to teach the third 
grade for she says there are some 
little girls in it as sweet as pickles. 



Quite a number of Students en- 
joyed the "social activities" at New- 
ville school house Wednesday even- 
ing. 



Mr. Zug — Which is right "Zug 
or Zook?" 

Mr. Zug — Some call me the one 
aj d some the other. 



A local holiday was proclaimed 
on the hill on March 4th, the event 
being the celebration of Arthur 
Moyer's birthday. 



Prof. Wenger (looking scrutin- 
izingly at his book) I have some- 
thing written here but I can't read 
it unless I look. 



Mr. Zendt at the banquet — I am 
glad several of the Professors favor 
social activities and I hope it con- 
tinues. (With emphasis on con- 
tinues). 



Miss Henning to Miss Hershey — I 
bet you wish you were I last night. 

Miss Hershey — Why? 

Miss Henning — Because my 
name was Ollie Moth. 



The secretary was calling the 
roll. When Miss. Martz's name 
was called she replied "Adsum." 

Miss Moyer interested, "Is that 
the way you must answer when you 
want to be excused early? 



Miss Brubaker — "Why did you 
put me on for one of the officers of 
the society? You should have put 
Peter Ziegler on." 

Mr. Royer — No, we didn't want 
a boy we wanted a girl. 



Teacher in Chemistry — Do you 
all understand now or does some- 
one have a question? 

Mr. Myers — Yes, I have one — 
What does convalescent (nomencl- 
ature) mean? 



Mr. John Gibble to Professor 
Harley — Those loose bolts in the 
top of that gas range are a sign that 
the sap has dried out of the steel 
plates. 

Professor Harley — I believe it 
with difficulty. 

(Continued on page 20) 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Alumni Notes 



DO NOT FORGET TO SEND IN 
YOUR QUESTIONNAIRE AT 
ONCE IF YOU HAVE NOT DONE 
SO BEFORE THIS TIME. WE 
NEED THE INFORMATION TO 
REVISE OUR RECORDS. 

Thank you. Alumni Editor for 
Elizabethtown College. 

Abel W. Madeira, '10, is living in 
Harrisburg, Pa. He is serving the 
State Department as an accountant. 

Salinda M. Dohner, '18 is typist 
and clerk for a firm in Ephrata, Pa. 

John F. Graham, '17, is attending 
Bethany Bible School, Chicago. He 
finishes his Junior year this spring 
in the Seminary course. 

Irvin S. Goodman, '18, is instruct- 
or in Modern Languages in North- 
western Academy, Lake Geneva, 
Wisconsin. Since graduation he has 
pursued work in Romance Lan- 
guage in the University of Chicago 
and the New School of conversa- 
tional French in Chicago during 
1919-20. 

Albert L. Reber, '13 is Proprietor 
of the Fey Supply Co., in Chicago. 

Henry Wenger, '20, is engaged 
in Teaching. 

B. Irine Wise, '11, is serving as a 
Private Secretary in the Kreider 
Shoe Co., in Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Anna M. Landis, '18, is serving as 
a stenographer. She lives in 
Rheems. 

Maude B. Atkinson (nee Sprin- 
kle), '08 is a busy homemaker in 
Toledo, Ohio. She finds time to 
serve her community in community 
welfare work. 



Aaron G. Edris, '18, is an Elec- 
trical Engineer in Lebanon, Pa. 

Enoch R. Madeira, '08, is a Fore- 
man in the large silk mill in York, 
Pa. 

Grace I. Rowe, '10, is teaching 
History in the High School in Blue- 
field, W. Va. During the summer 
vacation she is doing graduate work 
in Education at the University. 

Herbert D. Root, '13, is assistant 
Engineer to the Sinclair Cuba Oil 
Company. He lives in Havana. 
Cuba, Apartado 2254. 

Miles H. Roth, '09, is an ac- 
countant in York. He also is busy 
in Social and Religious activities. 
Prof. R. W. Schlosser, '05?, is doing 
work in Columbia University for his 
Doctor's degree. He expects to 
finish all his work for the degree 
before he returns to the Faculty as 
a teacher. This is another step in 
the direction of firmly establishing 
Elizabethtown College as a first 
rate accredited college. 



A Spring Soliloquy 

The first robin stood 'neath a 

sheltering pine, 
While wintery shivers played tag 
down his spine ; 
The wind roughed his feathers. 
The cold nipped his feet, 
He had searched all in vain far a 
morsel to eat; 
He said to himself with a tear in 

his eye, 
"The early worm stayed south, 
and why didn't I?" 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



SPECIAL SPRING NORMAL 



AT" 



ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE 
APRIL 11-JUNE 8, 1921 



County Superintendents and the State 
Department of Public Instruction will ac- 
cept, without examination, work satisfac- 
torily completed at Elizabethtown College 
for provisional, professional and perma- 
nent certificates. This was not quite uni- 
versally the case heretofore. Prospective 
students who are aiming to get the profes- 
sional training urged by the state and 
county authorities can depend on this in- 
formation as an assured fact. These au- 
thorities have been seen in person concern- 
ing the matter, and therefore, this en- 
couragement comes as good news to all 
who contemplate better fitting themselves 
along professional lines. 



Regular members of the Faculty and a special teacher, Mr. Simon Landis, will 
have charge of the Spring Normal as indicated. Mr. Landis will also offer several 
regular preparatory academic courses. 



NINE WEEKS BEGINNING APRIL 11, 1921 

ALSO NINE WEEKS DURING THE SUMMER JUNE 20 — AUG. 20 

The following courses will be offered at Elizabethtown College and in each of 
the thirteen Pennsylvania state normal schools for prospective teachers and for the 
further professional training of teachers in service. This is at the suggestion of the 
Department of Public Instruction at Harrisburg. 



a. GROUP A 

1. The Teaching of Arithmetic, 



Hrs. 


No. 


Sem. 


per 


of 


hrs. 


week 


wks. 


credit 



This course will include primary number, arith- 
metic, and compositive mathematics, differenti- 
ated by groups where there are sufficient stu- 
dents. PROFESSOR HOFFER. 

The Teaching of English 

This course will include reading, English gram- 
mar, spelling, oral and written composition. 

MR. S. B. LANDIS. 



1% 



1% 



26 OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



3. The Teaching of Social Studies 3 9 1 V2 

This course will include United States History, 

History of Pennsylvania, Civics and Patriotism. 
PROFESSOR H. H. NYE. 

4. The Teaching of Science 3 9 1 l /> 

This course will include geography, physiology, 

hygiene and general science. 

PROFESSOR A. C. BAUGHER. 



b. GROUP B 

1. Public School Music 

a. Elementary Public School Music 

Elementary course for those students who 
have not had the theory of music in 
grades or high school. 

MR. E. G. MEYER. 

b. Advanced Public School Music 

Part of the regular Arts 4 course pre- 
supposes a knowledge of music. 

MRS. JENNIE MILLER VIA. 



2. Art. 



a. Art 2 9 V 2 

Elementary course for those students who 

have not had a good course in elementary 
art in grades or high school. 

b. Art 2 9 y 2 

Part of regular Art 1 course. Presup- 
poses a previous elementary course. 

MRS. EMMA CASHMAN WAMPLER. 

c. Health Education 2 9 V 2 

This course to include school gymnastics, 

playground, etc. 

MISS FLORENCE MOYER. 

c. GROUP C 

1. Handwriting ^ 2 9 ^ 

Regular Art 1. 1 course. Methods of teach- 
ing will be emphasized. 

PROFESSOR J. Z. HERR. 

2. Observation, Management &. Methods 6 9 3 

(Including practice Teaching). 

PROFESSOR J. G. MEYER. 

3. Elective in Education 6 9 3 

See Group C\ 

All candidates for Provisional and Professional certificate are required to take 
all courses in Group A unless they have previous satisfactory credit for same. 

In Group B all candidates for Provisional and Professional certificate will be 
required to take one course in Public School Music, one course in Art, and Health 
Education. 

One elective six hours per week, or two electives three hours per week will be 
required of all students. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 27 



d. GROUP C Recommended courses in Education (credit) 

1. Kindergarten-Primary Methods 6 9 3 

2. Kindergarten Theory 4 9 2 

3. Citizenship by Professor H. H. Nye 4 9 2 

4. Introduction to Teaching by Mr. J. I. Baugher 6 9 3 

5. Introduction to Psychology 3 9 1% 

6. Child Study by Professor J. G. Meyer 3 9 1 1 / 2 

7. School Efficiency 6 9 3 

8. History of Education 4 9 2 

9. Principles of Education 4 9 2 

10. Standard Measurements 6 9 3 

11. Rural School Problems 6 9 3 

12. Rural Sociology by Professor H. H. Nye 4 9 2 

13. Sociology 6 9 3 

14. Current Educational Problems 5 9 2*4 

This course to take up the following subjects 

during the free hour: 

e. GROUP D Cultural group for professional and permanent certificates. 

1. English Literature, Miss Florence Moyer 12 9 6 

2. General History 12 9 6 

3. Biology (Science 1) 12 9 6 

This course includes elementary botany and 

zoology. 

4. Physical Science 12 9 6 

This course to include Physical Geography and 

Elementary Physics. 

5. Composite Mathematics, Mr. Simon Landis 12 9 6 
This course to include Algebra and Plane 

Geometry. 

Students who complete satisfactorily any subjects in Group D will receive certi- 
ficate that will be accepted in lieu of examination for the permanent certificate. 

SOCIAL STUDIES 

Under the head of social studies courses in Community Civics, History of Penn- 
sylvania, American History, and Rural Sociology will be given. In the case of the first 
three studies the leading fact will be reviewed by the students. Part of the time 
will also be devoted to the discussion of practical methods in the teaching of the sub- 
jects in the public schools. 

In Rural Sociology the need of revolutionizing Country life will be discussed. 
Migration from the country to the city is a great social problem confronting us. 
Movements will be discussed that may tend to check this tide and reverse it. The 
rural school, the rural church, rural social organizations and agricultural interests 
will be emphasized to the end that greater interest may be aroused in country life 
and that the country may be made a better place in which to live. 

PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 

The tendency today is very strong in the direction of doing in training what one 
is expected to do in the school room. Special emphasis will be put on methods of 
teaching the several subjects as will be seen from the above description of courses 
to be offered. The thing aimed at is the formation of the specific habits needed in 
ar> actual teaching situation. 

The above program will be offered during the Spring Term beginning April 11 
and also during the nine-week Summer Normal beginning June 20 and ending Aug. 
20, 1921. Students enrolling in either the Spring Normal or the Summer Normal 
will take the above program of required courses when in the judgment of the enroll- 
ment committee they qualify. Otherwise they will be urged to take regular prepara- 
tory academic studies together with several courses in methods. County Superin- 
tendents and the state Department of Public Instruction have definitely agreed to 
accept work, without examination, done at Elizabethtown College in the Spring and 
Summer Normals. 

Address: ELIZ4BETHT0WN COLLEGE, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



28 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Darby Brand Canned Foods Are Quality 
Packed. Packed Exclusively For 

Comly, Flanigen & Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 

118 & 120 So., Delaware Ave., Phi la. 

Ask Your Dealer For Darby Brand 
A Trial will convince 



A. B. DRACE 
PAINTER 

AND 

PAPER HANGER 



S. Market St. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



COLLEGE JEWELRY OF THE BETTER 
SORT 

J. F. APPLE CO. 

MANUFACTURING 
JEWELER 

College and Fraternity Pins, Rings, Medal* 

Prize Cups, Foot Balls, Basket Balls 

120 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. Box 570 

DR. S. J. HEINDEL & SON 

DENTIST 

Out-of-Town Friday each week 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

HEADQUARTERS FOR MAGAZINES 

Subscriptions and Counter Sales 

Best Display in County 

THE ROOT MAGAZINE AGENCY 

21 W. High St. Elizabethtown, Pa. 



FOR PHOTOGRAPHS 

CALL AT BISHOP'S 

New and Modern Studio 

Elizabethtown, Penna. 
We Guarantee All Work 

See us before having your diploma or those pictures framed. 

amateur finishing solicited 
eastman line of kodaks and films for sale 

'ooqqoooqoqoooqqqooqqqqqgoooqqoqoqooooqoooqgoqooooooooqoqooqq* 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



29 



Franklin & Marshall College 

LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 
Offers Liberal Courses in Arts and Sciences 

Campus of 54 acres with ten building 
including Gymnasium and complete Ath- 
letic Field. 

For Catalogue apply to 
HENRY H. APPLE, D.D., LL.D., Pre.. 



Waterman Fountain Pens 



— AT— 



Ream's Book Store 



Y. M. C. A. BUILDING 



LANCASTER, 



PENNA. 



H. H. GOOD 

HORST'S G6ntral Ivl6at |Vlark6t 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 
CENTRE SQUARE 

for 

Bell Phone 31R4 

Oysters, Ice Cream, Confectionery elizabethtown, -:- penna. 



GANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor. North Queen & Orange Streets 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



Men's 
Reliable Outfitters 

Suits to measure from $35 to $65 

Ready made Suits for Young Men from 
$25.00 to $35.00 

Plain Suits Constantly on Hand from 
$25.00 to $35.00 



LANCASTER SANITARY MILK CO. 



PASTURIZED MILK 

AND 
CREAMERY BUTTER 



PURITY ICE CREAM 

North and Frederick Sts. 
BOTH PHONES, LANCASTER, PA. 



One Price — Always the Lowest 



CLOTHING FOR THE MAN OR BOY 

Complete line of 

SUITS & OVERCOATS 

Suits made to your measure. Men's 
furnishing a specialty. Best make of Shoes 
of all kinds for Men, Ladies and Children. 

Agent for first-class Laundry 



J. N. OLWEILER 
Near Centre Square Elizabethtown 



30 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



EAT 

GUnzenhaUsBr's Bread 

Delivered by 

E. C. HEILMAN 

Opposite P. R. R. Station Elizabethtown 



Save Your Money by Bringing Your Shoes 

E. W. MILLER 

DEALER IN SHOE FINDINGS 

All Kinds of 

Rubbers and Shoe Repairing Neatly Done 

221 South Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, :-: :-: PENNA. 



LUMBER 

AND 

MILL WORK 



We saw timbers 80 ft. and longer and 
deliver a barn complete in a couple weeks. 



B. F. Hiestand & Sons 



MARIETTA, 



PENNA. 



When In Need Of 

SHOES 

WHICH WILL GIVE YOU EXTREMELY LONG WEAR COME TO 

The W. A. Withers Shoe Co. 

OLD MAI KET HOUSE BLDG. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Prompt, Careful Attention Given To Maii Orders 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



31 



QUALITY 

LEBANON 

BOLOGNA 

Made in the Most Modern and 

Sanitary Plant 
Manufacturing this Famous Product 



"MORRIS SUPREME" 

FOOD PRODUCTS 

Advertised and known over the 
Entire World 

THE LEBANON BOLOGNA 
and 

PROVISION CO. 

D. B. Buck, Secretary and Mgr. 

H. W. Buck, Distributor 




[made on honor^builtfor SERVICE! 



Base Ball and Lawn Tennis Goods 

Foot Ball and Basket Ball Goods 

Sporting Goods Of All Kinds 

Books, Stationery and Office 

Supplies 

DUTEWEILER 

813 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, . :-: :-? PENNA. 



CLASS PINS AND RINGS 

For Colleges, High Schools, Sunday 
Schools, etc. Illustrated catalog mailed 
upon request. We are also Headquarters 
for Colleges and High School pennants. 
Let us know your wants. 

UNION EMBLEM CO. 
Dept. 89, Palmyra, Pa. 



WHATEVER YOU NEED IN 

MERCHANDISE 

ALWAYS GO TO 

GREENBLATTS DEPT. STORE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 
IT WILL PAY YOU 



>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXXKXXXXXXXXXXXXXX^O 

DEMY & DETRA 

Dealers in 

FARM IMPLEMENTS AND REPAIRS, HUBER TRACTORS, GASOLINE AND 
OIL ENGINES, HAND AND POWER PUMPS 




REPAIRING A SPECIALTY 



Ind. Phone 628 
Bell Phone 63-R2 



32 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Conducted on Sanitary Principles 


THE BEST THERE IS IN 


is the 


HARDWARE 


RALPH GROSS 


At the Lowest Possible Price 


SHAVING PARLOR 


BOGGS' QUALITY HARDWARE STORE 


Agency for Manhattan Laundry 


Elizabethtown, Pa. 



LEHMAN & WOLGEMUTH 
COM L 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED and FLOUR 
BOTH 'PHONES ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



JOHN M. SHOOKERS 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 

Repairing a Specialty 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 



Kodaks & Films Stationery 

H. K. DORSHEIMER 

Confections Athletic Goods 



)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO{ 

PIANOS-VICTROLAS 

Musical Instruments of Every Description 
Our Line Is Complete 



32 Makes of Pianos, 40 Styles 

Victor. Cheney, Star, Franklin and Solotone Phonograph 
Popular Sheet Music 9c a Copy 



CASH OR EASY PAYMENT PLAN 



KIRK JOHNSON & CO. 

16-18 W. King Street LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 

>0O00(XX>000O000O0OOOOOOO0OOOOOO000O00OOO00O0O00O00O00000000002 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



33 



GO TO 



GUY The BARBER 

HE'S ON THE SQUARE 

Kwick-Lite, Flashlights 

Kyanize, Floor Finish 



Joseph H, Rider & Son 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

FOR GOOD EATS CALL AT 

HornafiUs' Restaurant 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

OYSTERS IN SEASON 

ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO VISIT 

HIRSH & BR0. 

Centre Square, LANCASTER 

for 

Ready-Made and Made-to-Order 

Clothing tor Men and Boys 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS 



We are one of the largest manufacturers of 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

in the United States 



Strictly One Price To All 

Established in 1854 



KIEFFER & LANDIS 
NOTARY PUBLIC 

Real Estate 

Insurance Collections 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



BOOKS 



BIBLES 



STATIONERY 

Phonographs 



I. A. SHIFFER 



39 S. Market St. 



Elizabethtown 



COLLE.GE, HILL DAIRY 

PURE MILK AND CREAM 

Delivered Daily 

S. G. GRAYBILL 
ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

H. H. BRANDT 

Dealer in all kinds of 
BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE AND 
ROOFING PAPER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



CENTRAL 
MUSIC STORE 



Victrolas, Grafonolas, Records, Stringed 
Instruments, Stationery, Kodaks, Eastman 
Films, Waterman Fountain Pens and 
Greeting cards. 

Films Developed and Printed 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



34 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



'OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOj 

H. C. Schock, President J. E. Longenecker, V. President 

H. N. Nissly, Cashier 

SECURITY PROGRESS 

UNION NATIONAL MOUNT JOY BANK 



MOUNT JOY, 



PENNA. 



Capital. $125,000.00 Surplus and Profits $264,000.00 

Deposits $1,324,871.00 

An Honor Roll National Bank, Being 421 in Strength in the United States and 

2nd in Lancaster County 

Resources $2,165,000.00 

AH Directors Keep in Touch With the Bank's Affairs 

The Bank Board Consists of the Following: 

H. C. Schock Eli F. Grosh I. D. Stehman Christian L. Nissley 

J. E. Longenecker John G. Snyder J. W. Eshleman Johnson B. Keller 

T. M. Breneman Eli G. Reist Samuel B. Nissley S. N. Mumma 

Rohrer Stoner 

WE PAY 4% INTEREST ON CERTIFICATES AND SAVINGS 



SCHMIDT 
BAKERY 



Harrisburg, Pa. 



PRINTING 



For Schools, Colleges, Etc. is our hobby. 
The fact that we have a city equipped 
printing office in a country town, is suf- 
ficient evidence that we can do satis- 
factory work and last but not least, our 
prices are right. At present we are print- 
ing many monthlies for schools thruout 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This book- 
let is the product of our office. If the work 
appeals to you, get our price on your 
publication. 



The BULLETIN 

Jno. E. Schroll, Propr. 

MOUNT JOY, PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



35 



THE WILLEY COMPANY INC. 

Superior Laundry Machinery 



factory Columbia, penna. 



OFFICE PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



109 East King Street 




Lancaster, Penna. 



JACOB FISHER 

8 Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
WATCHMAKER & JEWELER 
With you for 40 years that's all 
From 10 to 20 per cent. lower than the 
lowest for the same grade of make. 




Seller's Kitchen Cabinet, the best ser- 
vant in your house. I have just received 
a half car load of above cabinets, which I 
will sell at Special reductions. Call and 
see the Cabinet, and get prices. 



H. S. HOTTENSTEIN, 
R. D. 2 ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



HERSHEY TRUST CO. 

HERSHEY, PENNA. 

Capital, Surplus and Profits $425,000.00 

Resources $3,500,000.00 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 
M. S. Hershey, President 
W. H. Lebhicker, V. Pres. 
Ezra F. Hershey, V. Pres. 
S. C. Stechon, Treas. 

John A. Landis U. G. Risser, M.D. 

J. B. Leithiser John E. Snyder 

Wm. F. R. Murrie A. W. Stauffer 

Commercial Banking Department 

Saving Department Trust Department 

LARGEST CIRCULATION AND 
ADVERTISING PATRONAGE 

Elizabethtown Chronicle 

Fifty-one Years Old and Still Young 



Garrett, Miller & Co. 



Electrical 
Supplies 



N. E. Cor. Fourth & Orange Sts. 
WILMINGTON, -:- ■:- DELAWARE 



36 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQ 

o 
© 

Hertzler's Department Store 1 

N. E. CORNER CENTRE SQUARE § 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. § 




Always Ready to Supply Your Needs Satisfactorily in 
DRY GOODS, STAPLE AND FANCY NOTIONS, BEST GROCERIES, FRUITS, 
SWEETMEATS, SHOES, WINDOW SHADES, QUEENSWARE, MEN'S 
WOMEN'S, BOYS' AND GIRL'S CLOTHING, OIL CLOTH, LINO- 
LEUM, CARPETS, RUGS, ETC. 

Goods displayed on three floors and separate carpet store, three doors 
east of Post Office. 

Agents for made to measure clothing — International Tailoring Co. of New 
York. 

We carry full stocks notwithstanding the great difficulty in obtaining 
goods at these high prices. 

Long experience in merchandising goe with prices of goods purchased here. 

HERTZLER BROS. 



© 



>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOC30000000000000000000000000000000000000000n 



)0000O0OC0CX3OOO0O000OO0O0O0O 
J. Hoffman Garber 



o 



o 



GARBER GARAGE 

Bell Phone 43R2 

AUTHORIZED 

SALES 

AND 

SERVICE 

Our Repair Department Is Complete with the Latest Ford Approved Machinery 
Ford Prices Used All Work Guaranteed 

OOCQQOQOQOOQOOOQOQQQQOQOOQOQOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOQ 



KLEIN'S 
Milk Chocolate 




Almond Bars 



§ "The Milkiest Kind of Milk Chocolate" 

§ oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 
o 

I MUTH BROTHERS 

§ DEALERS IN 

COAL, FLOUR, FEED AND LUMBER 

Our Special Domino Feed 

We aim to give a square deal that will merit 
your trade and friendship 

ELIZABETHTOWN, 
oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 



o 



>OOOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO( 

SPECIAL SPRING NORMAL 

—FOR— 

PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS 



April 11th, 1921- June 8th, 1921 



o 



A Wonderful Opportunity 

Special efforts will be put forth to give the best professional 
training obtainable. Only experienced instructors have been en- 
gaged to do the teaching during this special term. 



The wishes of the state department will be complied with in 
8 every detail possible. On page 25 of this issue there appears a more 
or less detailed description of the work that will be offered. 



n 



A LARGE ENROLLMENT IS ASSURED 



Write for a room at once 



Address ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



}£)QQQQQQQQQQOQOQGQQQQQOQOQQQOOQQQQQQQQQQQQQOOQOQQQQOOOOOQQOOQ< 




APRIL 
1921 




C&QQQQOQQQQQQOQQQOQQQQQOQQGQQGQQQQQQQOOQttOQQOQC<XX)OQQQQQQ<X>QQ 




What about the homeyou 
have promisedyourself 

build it NOW] 




See us for FREE building Kelps — 
working plans and cost estimates 



We Are Manufacturers of 

Doors and Window Frames, Doors and Sash, Mouldings, Dressers, Shutters and Q 
Blinds, Porch Work and Columns, Screens and Storm Sash, Hotbed 
Sash, Stair Work and Interior Finish 

And Dealers In 

Rough Lumber, Flooring and Ceiling, Fir Porch Flooring, Building Lime, Sand, 

Plaster, White Finish, Hydrated Lime, Brick, Cement, Asbestos, 

Asphalt, and Roll Roofing, Slate, Wall Board 

WE SPECIALIZE IN THE MANUFACTURE OF 

Shipping Cases and Tobacco Shooks 



We solicit your business am' aim to give you prompt and satisfactory ser- 
vice on short notice. It is not necessary that we build for you in order to 
sell you the material; call to see us or 'phone when in the market for any- 
thing in our line and -we shall be only too glad to give you our best service. 

Ask for our suggestions and we will cheerfully help you in planning your 
new buildings or remodeling your old ones. 

ELIZABETHTOWN PLANING MILL 

HOFFER BROSc, Proprietors 
^depe^dTn^eLA ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCKJOOOOOOOOOOGC 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 1 

^000000000<XX)OCX}OOOCK3000<XXXX}OOOCXXXXX>OOOOOOOOOOC}000000(X>0000< 



W. S. SMITH, President PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MaRTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

ELIZABETHTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL $100,000.00 

SURPLUS & PROFITS 144,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited Interest Paid On Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent 

DIRECTORS: 

W. S. Smith Elmer W. Strickler Peter N. Rutt 

F. W. Groff J. S. Risser B. L. Geyer 

E. C. Ginder Amos P. Coble E. E. Coble 

u 3OOOOOQCX>OOOOOOOOOOOOOQOQQOOOOOOOO000O00000000000O000000000O' 
O OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOGOOOOC 



o 



ELIZABETHTOWN EXCHANGE BANK 



Now Occupies Its New Bank Building 
Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 

Pays Interest on Time Deposits 

OFFICERS 

A. G. HEISEY, President ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier 
I. H. STAUFFER, Asst. Cashier C. A. COBLE, Teller 

DIRECTORS 

\ A - G. Heisey Henry E Landis B. H. Greider 

) Allen A. Coble ^ t^ -d M. K. Forney 

I H. J. Gish Geo.D.Boggs W . A. Withers 

) Jos. G. Heisey E - E * Hernle y A. C. Fridy 

3O0OOOCX3OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO00O0000OO00000000O000000000000i 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



a * • w 



PLAIN 
CLOTHING 



WATT & SHAND 



. Centre Square 



LANCASTER, PA. 



■ ■ 



|l>" 



GEORGE S. DAUGHERTY CO. 

N. York-Chicago -Pittsburg 



Quality No. 10 fruits and vege- 
tables in No. 10 tins. 



DODGE BROTHERS MOTOR CARS 

R. H. FORNEY 

GARAGE AND REPAIR SHOP 

On North Market Street 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- -:- PENNA. 

CHAS. b. dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



PATRONIZE 

OUR 

ADVERTISERS 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SINCE THE DAYS OF THE GOLDSMITHS 

The goldsmiths of olden times, with whom banking had its be- 
ginning, undertook only to safeguard money and valuables en- 
trusted to their care. 

Banks have increased their activities since that time until they 
have become an indipensable factor in the finance and commerce 
of all civilized nations. 

The modern business man and woman who make full use of 
their bank looks upon it as an institution dealing in business in- 
telligence as well as money and credit. 

We invite business men and women to make use of all our fa- 
cilities for service. 

The Farmers' National Bank 

LITITZ, PENNA. 

S. W. Buch, President J. H. Breitigan, Cashier. 



KEYSTONE NATIONAL BANK 

MANHEIM, PENNSYLVANIA 

CAPITAL $ 125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS 165,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 1,500,000 

FOUR PER CENT. INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS 
ACCOUNTS LARGE OR SMALL SOLICITED 

OFFICERS 
John B. Shenk, President 
H. M. Beamesderfer, Vice-President H. A. Merkey, Teller 
J. G. Graybill, Cashier Norman Weaver, Clerk 

Clair H. Keen, Asst. Cashier Anna Shollenberger, Clerk 

DIRECTORS 

H. M. Beamesderfer Jac<>b Q Hershey R. O. Diehl 

John R. Cassel John B. Hossler 

Morris B. Ginder J * B ' bhenk W> W . Mover 



OUR TRUST DEPARTMENT CAN SERVE YOU AS 

Executor, Administrator, Assignee, Receiver, Guardian 
Agent, Attorney in Fact, Registrar 
OF STOCKS AND BONDS, ETC. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Trimmer's Great 
Bargain Emporium 

On the Square 



McLaughlin Bros. 
DRAYMEN 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



Elizabethtown Roller Mills 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 
FLOUR, CORN MEAL AND FEED 



J. V. BINKLEY, Propr. 

402-404 South Market St. 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Pa. 



LOCAL, LONG DISTANCE HAULING 
26 Washington Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
BELL PHONE 39-R2 

MARTIN 

READY-MADE AND MADE-TO-ORDER 
MEN'S AND BOYS* 

CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS AND SHOES 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



[OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOJ 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MOUNT JOY, PA. 



Thomas J. Brown 
Jacob S. Carmany 
H. H. Myers 
Abraham L. Nissley 



directors: 

Gabriel Moyer 
Jos. B. Hostetter 
B. S. Stauffer 
Jno. W. Newcomer 
Amos N. Musser 



H. Roy Nissley 
Jacob N. Hershey 
E. S. Gerberich 
Henry H. Eby 



Capital $125,000.00 



Surplus & Profits $150,000.00 



officers: 

THOMAS J. BROWN, President J. S. CARMANY, Vice President 

R. FELLENBAUM, Cashier 

4% Paid on Savings Accounts and Time Certificates. Resources $1,600,000 
^OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXXXXXXXXKXXXX>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOGOOOOOOOOOOOOOOi 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SOUTH END GROCERY 

FRESH, FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES, CANDIES AND LUNCH GOODS 
"The little store with big business" 

Levi C. Hershey 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



A. W. CAIN 

DRUGGIST 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 

THE BETTER REPAIRING OF THE 

BARNES SHOE SHOP 

WILL GRATIFY YOU 

It's Real Economy 

43 South Market St ELIZABETHTOWN 

NISSLEY'S LUNCH & DINING ROOMS 

David D. Clare, Proprietor 

14-16 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER. PENNA, 



LANCASTER SCHOOL SUPPLY CO. 

L. B. Herr & Son 
Booksellers 

Stationeries 

Printers 

46-48 W. King St. LANCASTER, PA. 

THE GROSS 
CONFECTIONERY 

122 S. Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



BARD-BLANKENMYER CO., Inc. 

plumbingTheating 

and SHEET METAL WORK 



118 South Queen Street, 



LANCASTER, PA. 



GUNSMITH 



LOCKSMITH 



DOMNITZ BROS. 

If it's a (LOCK) key, we have it 
222 1£ N. Q. St. LANCASTER, PA. 



A. C. McLANACHAN 
BARBER 

21 E. High St 

Second Door From Post Office 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



BUCH MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



WE BUILD THE FOLLOWING GOODS IN 

THE COLLEGE TOWN 



Wheelbarrows, Corn Shelters, Wood Saws, 
Land Rollers, Pulverizers, Water Troughs 



HENRY L. GISE 



Notary Public, Surveyor and Conveyancer 

Insurance of all Kinds 

Agent for 

State Capital Savings and Loan 

Association 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



J. W. G. Hershey, Pres. 

J. Bitzer Johns, V. Pres. 

Henry R. Gibbel, Sec. & Treas. 



The Lititz Agricultural 

Mutual Fire 

Insurance Company 



Insures against Lightning, Storm and Fire 

Insurance in force $39,000,000 
Issues both Cash and Assessment Policies 



13 EAST MAIN STREET 
LITITZ, PENNA. 



PHONOGRAPHS 

We handle only one make and that is the 

EDISON STai 

FISHER'S 

8 Centre Square 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



EBY SHOE COMPANY 

Incorporated 
Manufacturers of 

MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S 

FINE WELT AND TURNED 

SHOES 



LITITZ, 



PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



HEATING and PLUMBING 



Miller Pipeless Furnaces 

and 
Leader Water Systems 



LEO KOB 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
>ooooooooooogoooooooooooooooooc3ooooqooooqoqqqqoooqqooooqooooo 



J. W, ZARF088 

GENERAL HARDWARE 

Sporting and Housefurnishing 
Goods 



ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

POTTS DEPARTMENT STORE 

"EPHRATA'S BIGGEST BEST STORE" 

EBERLY BROTHERS 
SHOES COAL 

Main & State S. State St. 



Ephrata, Pa. 



CHAS. K. MUSSER 



Electrical 
Contractor 

All Kinds of 

Electrical Supplies and Fixtures 

HOUSE WIRING A SPECIALTY 

The Ephrata Review 

$1,50 A YEAR 

Best Job Printing 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



Chas. S. Yeager, Propr. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



HIVE 




BEE 
HIVE 



DEPARTMENT STORE 



OUR CREED 



We believe in the goods we are selling in our ability 
to get results. We believe that honest goods can be sold 
to honest people by honest methods. We believe in work- 
ing, not wasting; in laughing, not crying; in boosting, 
not knocking; and in the pleasure of doing business. We 
believe that a man gets what he goes after; that a cus- 
tomer today is worth two customers tomorrow; and that 
no man is down and out until he has lost faith in himself. 
We believe in courtesy, in kindness, in generosity, in good 
cheer, in friendship, and in honest competition. We be- 
lieve in increasing our business, and that the way to do 
it is to reach for it. 



WE ARE REACHING FOR YOURS 

A. A. ABELE 

ELIZABETHTOWN. 
>ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooc 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



)OOOCXXXXXXX>OOOCXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX}OOOOOOOCX>CXXXXX>OOOOCXKXXXXXX>OC< 



When the Green Gits Back in the Trees 



In Spring, when the green gits back in the trees, 

And the sun comes out and stays, 
And yer boots pulls on with a good tight squeeze, 

And you think of yer bare-foot days; 
When you ort to work and you want to not, 

When the whole tail-feathers o' Wintertime 

Is all pulled out and gone! 
And the sap it thaws and begins to climb, 

And the swet it starts out on 
A feller's forred, a gittin' down 

At the old spring on his knees — 
I kindo' like jest a-loaferin' roun' 

When the green gits back in the trees — 
Jest a-potterin' round' as I-durn-please — 
When the green, you know, gits back in the trees! 

And you and your wife agrees 
It's time to spade up the garden-lot, 

When the green gits back in the trees 
Well ! work is the least o' my idees 
When the green, you know, gits back on the trees! 



When the green gits back in the trees, and bees 

Is a buzzin' aroun' ag'in 
In that kind of a lazy go-as-you-please 

Old gait they bum roun' in ; 
When the ground's all bald whare the hay-rick stood, 

And the crick's riz, and the breeze 
Coaxes the bloom in the old dog-wood, 

And the green gits back in the trees — 
I like, as I say, in sich scenes as these 
The time when the green gits back in the trees! 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 






EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Jacob S. Harley 

Associate Editor Florence T. Moyer 

Departmental Editor H. H. Nye 

Alumni Editor L. W. Leiter 

Religious News Editor Ezra M. Wenger 

( Emma Ziegler 

School News ] 

( Stanley Ober 

Circulation Manager J. Z. Herr 

Business Manager E. G. Meyer 

Our College Times is published monthly during the Academic year of Elizabeth- 
town College. 

This paper will have to be discontinued as soon as the time of subscription expires 
as an action of the United States legislature. 

Please renew in time and report any change of address to the business manager. 

Subscription rates one dollar per year; fifteen cents per copy; six subscriptions 
$5.00 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



Jubilee Edition! What is it? 

The Alumni number of the Eliz- 
abethtown College Bulletin. Just 
out! 

Alumni and friends are you aware 
what victory this new Bulletin pro- 
claims for you? Read in it of the 
Standardization, the completion of 
the Endowment Campaign, the 
Building outlook the Revised Cour- 
ses of Study, Spirit of the School — 



Progress in every respect. This is 
the day of boosters — join the ranks 
for your college ! 

One sign of being a good Alum- 
nus or friend is to patronize the 
school paper. Our College Times 
is offered to you, subscription price 
$1.00, including Senior number of 
the paper. This number will come 
out in June. Subsribe now to be 
sure of it. Tell others about it. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



The View From the Top 

So here has been dawning 

Another blue day; 
Think with thou let it 

Slip useless away? 

Carlyle. 

Opportunities have been likened 
to mushrooms which spring up over 
the night: These may best be gath- 
ered early in the morning while the 
dew is on the grass and before the 
sun has begun to cast its oppressive 
heat rays. When taken fresh they 
are very enjoyable and healthy. 
But if left to stand over night they 
may become poisonous and are more 
harm than good to the body. How 
many days slip uselessly away in 
just that manner! 

Opportunity lost, neglected 
which can never be recalled, verit- 
able poison to a young life. Each 
day of life is like a climb or ascent 
The dawn of the day is bright with 
hope, fresh with the dew of promise. 
The day wears on, the sun casting 
its oppressive rays in the form of 
obstacles. Eventide approaches, 
bringing with it many times no sign 
of the early promise and hope. 

The writer recalls a certain trip 
which may well be likened to a 
day of opportunity. A party was 
making an excursion to the Sand 
Dunes of Northern Indiana. The 
destination was a good three miles 
from the train. Impassable by 
automobile or wagon, the way had 
to be made by foot, carrying all the 
baggage for a week end. Up hill 
down dale, through sandy forest 
the greater part of the way lead. 
On and on we went with foot slip- 
ping back every second step, trying 
to smile in spite of waning energy 



and sinking sun. Finally passing 
through a thickly wooded valley 
we came to an open clearing, and 
towering before us, saw a vast 
mountain like dune of only sand, 
with very scant vegetation on the 
top. Only a few footprints could 
be seen and these were quickly 
covered up by the drifting sand. A 
wooded valley behind, a vast 
mound of sand ahead, that was all, 
no sign of civilization in sight. It 
was the last climb but for a moment 
it seemed impossible to attempt it 
for it was high and steep and the 
encumbrances weighed heavily. 
But step by step the ascent was 
made; Ah, has it been made, or 
reached. What words can describe 
the view from 'the top! Sand 
stretching beyond sight of the eye, 
Heaven above in its limitless span 
of blue and before us the apparent- 
ly endless stretch of Lake Michigan 
its waters rolling in with muffled 
roar reflecting on the crest of the 
waves the wondrous tints of the set- 
ting sun. Ah yes, the view from the 
top, how beautiful, how wonderful! 
Turning about, the incline again ap- 
peared, the wooded valley, the 
distant trail. But the view from the 
top! 

The day ends; the ascent has been 
made, Ah, has it been made, or 
does the valley close about us with 
its early evening glooms while the 
glories of the sunset still rest upon 
the hill top? The view from the 
top — endurance, victory, eventide. 



Only three things are necessary 
in life — first, backbone ; second, 
backbone; third, backbone. 

Charles Sumner. 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Given Impromptu 



College Students Advantages Over 
Another 

A non-college man has practice 
but no theory and can develop a 
business such, for instance, as min- 
ing to a certain point, but no farther 
The college man starts out with the 
theory and as he gets the practice 
he can manage every detail with 
skill and make a far greater success 
of his enterprise. Further, the re- 
finement of a former student can 
often be traced back to his school 
life. Walter Longenecker 



War 

Though we should not dare to say 
that the good coming out of war 
outweighs the evil, yet we are sure 
something is gained. Some of the 
great lessons taught in the late war 
were thrift, acting effectively under 
pressing ' circumstances, and rapid 
development of resources. 

Robert Mohr. 



Vocal Music. 

We know that singing is impor- 
tant for we find it in the public 
schools generally, and the children 
put their whole souls into it. The 
church services would be dead 
without vocal music. More souls 
have been won for Christ by singing 
than by preaching. The choir 
should not do all the singing, be- 
cause all should have a chance to 
pour out the spirit within them, 
since they cannot all preach. The 
teacher of music who comes into in- 
dividual contact with his pulpit has 
an interesting profession. 

Esther Trimmer. 



Human Georgraphy 
Human geography treats of the 
relation of man to the lower ani- 
mals and to the material resources 
of the earth. It discovers the rela- 
tion which the progress of cities 
bears to climate, altitude, and trans- 
portation facilities. It tells of the 
evils of exploitation whether of for- 
ests or other resources, tells how 
many things are destroyed without 
being replaced. 

P. B. Brandt 



The Day Student 

The close companionship which 
a boarding student has with his fel- 
low-students makes him more kind 
and unselfish. But the day student 
receives a discipline almost as rigid 
as the boarding student receives 
and is more certain to take it in 
the spirit in which it is given. He 
has the companionship and inspira- 
tion of parents, brothers and sisters, 
and never experiences homesick- 
ness. 

Lois Falkenstein 



Nature Study 

The best way to teach nature is 
to take the class out for a walk in 
the woods or in the meadow and 
observe how the various plants 
grow. Show the children the vari- 
ous parts of a flower. Since there 
are ever so many people in this 
world of ours and each one has a 
special duty to perform, teach the 
children a lesson from the flower 
to find the task they are to do, and 
to do it with a will. 

Elsie Landis 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



Societies 

The reorganization of the Key- 
stone Society into the Penn and the 
Franklin, rival societies, and the 
resumption of activities on the part 
of the Homerian afford the students 
of this College the fullest opportun- 
ity for the practice of reciting and 
oratory. 

Francis Barr 



Choice of Profession. 

By careful analysis of ourselves 
we may discover our talents. We 
should then choose a profession 
which will develop these talents, al- 
ways remembering that health is es- 
sential to success in any calling. If 
we choose wisely and strive on in 
our professions in the right spirit, 
our daily labors will bring us as 
much delight as play affords. 

Edwin H. Rinehart. 



An Autobiography of a Dime. 

I am an American dime. I am 
only ten years old, and in my short 
life, I have seen more and have trav- 
eled more than most men forty years 
old. I have been to all four corners 
of the globe, and have traversed the 
seas several times. I have been in 
the hands of all kinds of people. I 
am now in the hands of a miser, and 
since I have no immediate prospects 
of getting out of here, I thought I 
would write a biography of my- 
self. 

I was born, or rather made, in the 
mint in Philadelphia. When I was 
finished how proud I was of my new 
shining coat! With a lot of other 
money I was sent to a bank in Erie, 



Pennsylvania. I remained there sev- 
eral days near a window and had 
a chance to observe the people who 
traded at the bank. 

One day while I was watching the 
people at my window, a young man 
came in, and I was given to him 
with some other money in exchange 
for a piece of paper. I did not know 
what it was at the time, but I learn- 
ed later that it was a check which 
he handed to the clerk. How care- 
lessly he handled me! He shoved 
me deep down in his pocket, where 
tlere was a lot of other money, bills 
included. After walking a short 
piece he got on a trolley car, and 
then handed me to the conductor. 

The conductor dropped me down 
a long slender tube where there 
were a few other dimes.' It so hap- 
pened that I dropped near the bot- 
tom of the tube, and I did not get 
used that day. That night I had 
the experience of my lifetime. 
When the conductor finished his 
rounds, and arrived at the office, he 
handed me to a man who put me 
in a large box, which I later learned 
was a safe. That night after I had 
slept for a while I was awakened 
by some one tinkering at the safe. 
After a short time I heard a muffled 
explosion, and then I saw a small 
light. I saw some men around it, 
and heard them talking in a low 
tone. They were thieves and rob- 
bers, and they had robbed the trol- 
ley office. 

Then they seized me and every- 
thing that was in the safe, and put 
us in a satchel, and got in an auto- 
mobile and rode away. They went 
as far as Pittsburgh, and stopped in 
the dirtiest corner of the town, and 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



got out and went into a very small 
house. In a dirty room they took 
us out of the satchel, and started to 
divide us. I then had a chance to 
observe who my captors were. They 
were four in number. During the 
process of dividing us they did much 
swearing and drinking. I went to 
a man with a red beard, and who 
seemed to be leader of the gang. 

He put me in a small cloth sack, 
and then got on a train and traveled 
across the continent. At San Fran- 
cis- -o he took a boat and went to 
Alaska. He gave me to a storey 
keeper there in exchange for a plug 
of tobacco. That was the last I saw 
of him. I supposed that he had 
tome to Alaska to hunt for gold. 

The store-keeper gave me to a 
laissian. I do not know to this day 
how I got into his hands, or why he 
took me for I was the only Ameri- 
can coin in his pocket. I felt very 
lonely among all the foreign coins. 

He took me to Petrograd, where 
I was put back into a bank again. 

Remaining in the bank for a few 
days I was given to an American 
who was going back to America. I 
felt very glad to be with my own 
countrymen again. I could now 
have some one to talk to and to 
swap experiences with. Till we got 
to America we had all of our stories 
told. When he got back home he 
gave me to his little daughter to 
buy some candy. She seemed to 
have a spirit of thrift in her, for in- 
stead of buying candy she put me 
in her little toy bank. 

This is but a sample of my travels. 
J have been in stores a hundred or 
more times. I have been in banks 



about fifty different times. These 
numbers are all rude estimates, for 
it would be hard to tell the exact 
number of times. As I have said 
before, I have come to rest in the 
hands of a miser who counts his 
money every night before he goes 
to bed. A. R. 



The House of the Trees 

Ope your door and take me in, 

Spirit of the wood ; 
Wash me clean of dirt and din, 

Clothe me in your mood. 

Lift your leafy roof for me, 
Part your yielding walls; 

Let me wander lingeringly 
Through your scened halls. 

Ope your doors and take me in, 

Spirit of the wood ; 
Take me make me next of kin 

To your leafy brood. 

Than must be true thyself 

If thou the truth wouldst teach; 

Thy soul must overflow 

If another's soul wouldst reach; 

It needs the overflow of heart 
To give the lips full speech. 



Does it seem an idle thing 
A pleasant word to speak? 

The face you wear, the thought you 
bring, 
A heart may heal or break. 



ATHLETICS 



During every minute of recrea- 
tion hour the campus is a scene of 
the most enthusiastic activity. Base- 
ball is the game wt»i<»h j g creating 
the most interest at present. After 
several severe workouts every mus- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



cle, nerve and tendon has adjusted 
itself to the thrills of the national 
game . This with the spirited sup- 
port given us by the faithful "co- 
eds" can predict nothing less than 
season ''chuck-full" of sensational 
games. 

The growing interest necessitated 
the erection of a new bleachers 
twice the size of the old ones. The 
obstruction in left field has been re- 
moved and the field well -graded, 
the back-stop re-enforced and a trio 
of new sacks replace the ones dent- 
ed by the cleats of the fleet base 
runners. 

Thus far two first teams have 
been organized. The batteries are 
as follows: Raffensperger, catcher; 
D. Myers, Pitcher and Captain; and 
Edris pitcher. Ober, Catcher; Esh- 
leman, Pitcher and Captain; and 
Zendt, pitcher. At this writing 
three games have been played with 
D. Myers aggregation leading. The 
rivalry between these two teams is 
keen and the interest among the 
rooters is intense. 

Heretofore there existed on the 
hill an Athletic Association, but for 
the past several years it has ap- 
parently been in the hands of re- 
ceivers. Thru the faithful and ef- 
ficient work of the receivers the as- 
sociation has been assisted to its feet. 

On Tuesday evening April the 
12th the President of the Y. M. W. 
A. called a meeting of all the stu- 
dents interested in any form of ath- 
letics. A large percentage of the 
student body was present and the 
question of reviving the association 
was discussed pro and con for some 
length of time after which the fol- 



lowing organization was affected: 
President, Daniel Myers; Vice Presi- 
dent, Arthur Moyer; Secretary, 
Laura Hershey; and Treasurer, 
Amos Meyer. 

At a later meeting the following 
captains, to hold offices for the rest 
of the school year, were elected: 
Base Ball, Walter Longenecker, 
Track Team, Pierce Brandt; and 
Tennis, Arthur Moyer. The officers 
and the captains, together with a 
faculty adviser, constitute the cabi- 
net of the association. 

A track team has also been lack- 
ing for the past several years. But 
with the momentum with which it 
is now going it will soon have made 
up for lost time. A new pit for 
broad, high and running jump has 
been constructed, and a track for 
relays has also been laid out. Mr. 
Brandt the able £nd enthusiastic 
captain of this phase of physical 
education, is working hard to have 
his department cope with other out- 
door sports. Mr. Longenecker has 
also been busy with a squad of men 
in leveling and grading the base 
ball field, while Mr. Moyer and his 
squad are busily engaged in fitting 
the tennis courts for any "love" 
games that perchance might be 
played. 

In a few days we expect each of 
the above-mentioned sports to be 
in the height of its activity. And 
we know that the remaining eight 
weeks of school will witness "pep" 
never before manifested on the Hill. 
So let US get together and boost our 
Athletics, if you are not playing, 
root; and if you are not rooting, 
play. S. O. 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Departmental 



Physical Science 

The Toil of science swells the 
wealth of art. — Schiller. 

Science is the natural ally of re- 
ligion. — Theodore Parker. 

The birth of science was the 
death of superstition. — Huxley. 

The work in science is to sub- 
stiute facts for appearances, and 
demonstrations for impressions. — 
Ruskin. 

Science is simply common sense 
at its best, that is, rigidly accurate 
in observation, and merciless to 
fallacy in logic. — Huxley. 

There can be no body of rules 
without a rationale, and this ration- 
ale is science. — Sir G. C. Lewis. 

Through all God's work there 
runs a beautiful harmony. The re- 
motest truth in His universe is 
linked to that which lies nearest the 
throne. — E. H. Chapin. 

What are the sciences but the 
maps of universal laws; and the 
universal laws but the channels of 
universal power; and the universal 
power the outgoings of a universal 
mind. — Ed. Thomson. 

Science is a good piece of furni- 
ture for a man to have in the upper 
chamber, provided he has common 
sence on the ground floor. — O. W. 
Holmes. 

Science, in other words, know- 
ledge, is not the enemy of religion ; 
for, if so, then religion would mean 
ignorance. But it is often the an- 
tagonist of school-divinity. — O. W. 
Holmes. 

Holding then to science with one 
hand, the left hand, and we give 



the right hand to religion, and cry: 
"Open Thou mine eyes, that I may 
behold wondrous things, more 
wonderful than the shining worlds 
can tell." Obedient to the promise, 
religion does awaken faculties with- 
in us, does teach our eyes to the be- 
holding of more wonderful things. 
Those great worlds like blazing 
suns die like feeble stars in the 
glory of the morning, in the pres- 
ence of this new light. The soul 
knows that an infinite sea of love 
in all about it, throbbing through it, 
everlasting arms of affection lift it, 
and it bathes itself in the clear con- 
sciousness of a Father's love. — 
Bishop H. W. Warren. 

Selected by A. C. B. 



Reading. 

The class in reading during the 
Winter term studied phonics and 
were drilled in forming and hearing 
sounds; and they were also taught 
diacritical marking, so as to be able 
to pronounce words as found mark- 
ed in the dictionary, our Bibles, and 
in magazines. 

Practice in thought getting and 
intelligent oral reading was taught 
from the floor and on the platform. 
Selections from good literature, 
were assigned from day to day for 
study and oral expression. 

The class in Elocution is now 
studying Tennyson's "Lady Clare." 
with the view of developing Thought 
power, Imagination and Sympathy 
concerning the characters represent- 
ed in the poem. The students in this 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



class will receive drill in articula- 
tion and pronounciation, together 
with training in "The elements of 
Pitch, Force, Time and Gesture, in- 
cluding Facial Expression. 

If students are taught to open the 
mouth well, to articulate all sounds 
distinctly, and to develop volume in 
voice, and to interpret the thought 
in the selection they read, it is be- 
lieved that any normal person can 
become a good reader. Very grati- 
fying results have been obtained 
among our students and much of the 
practice given has been made use of 
in Literary Society work and in Ora- 
torical Contests. 



Some one has said that the rules, 
principles, and definitions of gram- 
mar constitute "The Everlasting 
Why" which guides us in the correct 
use of English. 



English Grammar. 

The C class in grammar is study- 
ing the English sentences and notic- 
ing the natural order in the arrange- 
ment of words, as well as the trans- 
posed order. They will receive drill 
on the different parts of speech by 
composing sentences containing the 
parts of speech just studied. 

The B class is studying classes 
and properties of nouns and pro- 
nouns. The subject of gender, and 
peculiar use of abstract, collective 
and personified nouns will receive 
special attention. This we think is 
an aid in appreciation of good Liter- 
ature. The Bible itself contains ex- 
amples of this special line of work: 
viz., Mercy and Truth have met to- 
gether; Righteousness and Peace 
have kissed each other. 

The A class has studied declen- 
sion and been given a drill on the 
proper use of the nominative and 
objective forms of pronouns. They 
are now studying the forms and uses 
of verbs. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
Our Platform. 

It makes no difference where you 
are or what you do in life: You 
Are a Teacher. This is true of ev- 
erybody But in a country like ours 
we have need of developing those 
standards which will make teaching 
a profession. Elizabethtown College 
aims to do her bit. She has gained 
recognition and prestige. It rests 
with her students to make good and 
her future is assured. 

A competent, well-trained teach- 
er in hearty accord with the best 
American ideals, is needed in every 
public school position in the U. S. 

There is need of increased facili- 
ties for the training of teachers, 
and such inducements to enter the 
teaching profession as will attract 
men and women of the highest char- 
acter and ability to this important 
field of public service. 

Elizabethtown College will do all 
she can to assume her full share of 
the educational burden. Our Col- 
lege stands four square for Christ- 
ian Education. She stands for the 
greatest service to the greatest num- 
ber. She is putting forth strenuous 
efforts to help professionalize the 
teaching profession. In her courses 
in Education she is upholding only 
the highest standards. With the 
long hoped for recognition, from 
the state, the way is open for her to 
enter upon a new Era of growth 
and development. 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



French 

To study French is to have a sur- 
prise after spending much time on 
Latin or any other ancient lan- 
guage. It is easy after having a 
Latin foundation because its con- 
struction is bassed on the Latin con- 
struction but it can also be mas- 
tered quite well without the Latin. 
It contains the beauty, elegance and 
lofty thought of the Ancient Lan- 
guages on the one hand and the Ro- 
mance of the Spanish or Italian 
Languages on the other hand. 

It is very interesting because it is 
a living language and the late war 
has made it truly live for all who 
wish to understand the people side 
by side with whom our boys fought 
so bravely. It is the polite lan- 
guage of the world. 

What a few students of French 
have testified concerning it, is in- 
teresting and perhaps more con- 
clusive than any thing that could 
be said. The following responses 
were given without hesitation when 
different ones were asked why they 
liked the subject. 

"It is very interesting." 

"It is practical, that is, we can 
talk it." 

"It has so many idiomatic expres- 
sions which make it so interesting." 

"It is a beautiful spoken lan- 
guage." 

"There are real things told 
about." 

"It is fascinating and cultural." 

"I don't know why, but I intend 
to take more French." 

"It is the popular and diplomatic 
language of the world." 

"There is more life to it." 



"It helped me in my study of 
music. 

"Because so many English words 
are derived from the French." 



To The Students of the Bible 

There are many people who feel 
that we should have more Bible 
study, and it is true for in it we find 
the words and rules of life. 

However the increased pressure 
that is brought to bear upon the 
phase of our devotions also causes 
this fact to confront us: The study 
of the Bible may tend to cause us 
to lose faith in its lines when we 
compare them with other Litera- 
ture. But why should it? When 
we study Tennyson, Shakespeare or 
perchance Dante we take plenty of 
time and pains to find out the cir- 
cumstances and conditions, in and 
under which they wrote. We al- 
ways give them the benefit of a 
doubt when we do not understand 
them. 

The Study of the Bible is not 
dangerous at all if the Student 
learns to look at the Biblical Litera- 
ture in a fair and unbiased way. He 
must take into account the Historic- 
al background, the Scientific in- 
vestigations and findings and the 
peculiar Language and composition 
of the Bible. Taking these things 
into account and adding to these 
the guidance of the Holy Spirit, it 
is safe to study the Bible, and dis- 
belief will find no place in our lives 
but we will grow in understanding 
and in Spiritual Stature. 

Let us study the Bible more and 
study it fairly. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



"Home Economics." 

"Happy is he who sits down to the 
dinner provided for him without 
thought of what he must leave out, 
with a mind free for social pleasure, 
secure in skill and knowledge of his 
cook." This quotation taken from 
one of the courses of study namely 
Dietetics, which is being given in 
the Home Economics courses pre- 
sents the index to the whole study. 
Dietectics aims to teach the use of 
food adapted to the needs of the hu- 
man body beginning with the baby 
and traced to old age. Not only is 
food itself considered but food com- 
binations, menus, and pleasant and 
correct manner of serving. To those 
taking this course is opened the field 
of the Dietitian not only in the home 
but in any institution public or pri- 
vate where meals are served. The 
Dietitian is more in demand today 
than ever before. The next few 
weeks will be devoted to meal serv- 
ing — the practical side of Dietetics. 
A breakfast, luncheon and dinner 
will be served by each group, em- 
phasizing the balance of food and 
pleasure to taste in a meal purchas- 
ed and served on a given moderate 
sum of money. 

The close friendly association of 
the Sewing Class was clearly mani- 
fested at a very pleasant gathering 
which Rhoda Newcomer, one of the 
girls, had at her home a short dis- 
tance below Mount Joy, April 2nd. 
A number of interesting games and 
contests were played and a very 
excellent luncheon served which ev- 
ery girl enjoyed as only college 
girls can enjoy an unusual treat. 



\s the close of school approaches 
the Sewing Course is also coming to 
an end. This course had had a very 
practical value. A great many gar- 
ments of all descriptions have been 
made. These will be placed on ex- 
hibit at some stated time, toward 
the close of the school term. You 
are cordially invited to view the 
Sewing Exhibit. 



A Visit to Buch's Plant 

On Tuesday, April 12, the class 
on Cost Accounting visited the Buch 
Manufacturing Plant in town for 
the purpose of getting the practical 
side of Cost Accounting. 

Their method of cost finding is an 
interesting one and proved very 
helpful to us in seeing how methods 
we have studied about are applied 
in industry. 

Miss Meckley who is chief ac- 
countant for the firm, understands 
the system very well, this being 
very evident by the way in which 
she explained every detail. 

After Miss Meckley had very 
vividly explained the cost system as 
pertaining to the office Mr. Hamil- 
ton took us through the different de- 
partments of the factory and ex- 
plained the different processes of 
manufacturing. 

This was very interesting as none 
of us had ever visited a plant with 
similar construction methods. 

The genuine courtesy expressed 
by the authorities was very much 
appreciated by the members of the 
class as well as the teacher. 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Chapel Echoes 

The accusations brought against 
Christ were strange ones. They ac- 
cused Him of stirring up the people, 
which was a very good thing. 
The people even now need to be 
stirred at times by men who are 
Christlike. 



In Him was life and the life was 
the light of men." Jesus poured out 
that life on the cross for us. It is 
ours to accept if we will. 



Christ suffered great agony in the 
garden, because no one seemed to 
understand. The following poem 
expresses His suffering 
''Into the woods my Master went 

Clean forespent, forespent. 
Into the woods my master came 

Forespent with love and shame. 
But the olives they were not blind 
to him, 

The little gray leaves were kind 
to Him, 
The thorn tree had a mind to him, 

When into the woods He came. 
Out of the woods my Master went 

And He was well content 
Out of the woods my Master came 

Content with death and shame 
When death and shame would woo 
Him last, 

From under the trees they drew 
Him last 
T'was on a tree they slew Him last 

When out of the woods He came. 



God wants us to be holy. He 
attaches no condition to this state. 



Much untruthfulness has crept 
into diplomacy. This is the sad con- 
dition in the government of the 



state but a still sadder fact is that 
untruthfulness has crept into the 
church. 

Settle your accounts. If you have 
borrowed anything, return it. Do 
not hide the truth but stand up for 
the right. 



Read the Bible. It is the Book 
which contains all kind of literature. 
If you wish to read poetry, dramatic 
literature, law, or romance, go to 
the Bible and you will find it. It 
is a safe book to read because it has 
been inspired of God. 



Be a booster, don't be a knocker. 
Try to do your best with that which 
you have and be content. Grasp 
opportunity when it is yours. 



Look for the good and beautiful 
in small things as well as in great 
things. 



The winner in the Christian life 
will receive an incorruptible crown. 
He who would be a winner must 
stand alone. He dare not do the 
things which others do, but his path 
lies straight before him. 



God is the source of all wisdom. 
We must come to Him daily for 
renewed power. 



"Only those develop who seek 
development." 

Stella Walker 



Local Bible Institutes 

On Easter Sunday two Bible In- 
stitutes were conducted ; one in 
Reading by Professors J. I. Baugher 
and L. W Leiter, and another in 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



Lititz by Prof. I. S. Hoffer and Ezra 
Wenger. 

The institute in Reading was a 
very successful one. The audiences 
were very responsive. 



Volunteer Activities 

The following deputation teams 
were sent out during the last month : 
To Springville, Misses B. Mary Roy- 
er and Martha Martin and Messrs. 
Edward Ziegler and Jesse Reber; 
To Ephrata and Lancaster, Messrs. 
Jesse Reber, Clarence Holsopple, 
Edward Ziegler and Alvin Bright- 
bill; To Mechanicsburg, Misses 
Florence Moyer and Stella Walker 
and Messrs. Lamen Beck and Ar- 
thur Moyer. These meetings have 
been very inspiring to the Volunteer, 
and the way in which the several 
audiences responded, makes us be- 
lieve that some good was done and 
that missionary sentiment is grow- 
ing. 

The Volunteers assisted in render- 
ing an Easter program at Newville 
before Easter. The Newville Audi- 
ences are always responsive to good 
things. 

The work of the Volunteer is 
however not limited to giving pro- 
grams. The home visitations and 
the personal work are given much 
attention. Quite a few of the Volun- 
teers are teaching in town Sunday 
Schools. Chester Royer, the presi- 
dent, is leading the Volunteers ad- 
mirably. He is conscientious and 
painstaking in his work. This, with 
the assistance of the Holy Spirit, 
will do much for the Volunteers, 
for the community, and for the 
Kingdom of GOD. 



April Courage. 

An April day is waking, 
God's promises are true, 

The crocus buds are breaking, 
With smiles, the brown earth thru 

Take courage, you who're sowing 
Good seeds for future hours 

Where adverse winds are blowing; 
They'll germinate in flowers. 

Although the soil seems fallow 
You plant with fondest care, 

And blind rocks make it shallow, 
And April will be there. 

— Sara Louiso Oberholtzer. 



Resolutions of Sympathy. 

Whereas, Our Savior has called 
to his side, our beloved fellow stu- 
dent, Oliver D. Fasnacht-, of Quarry- 
ville, Pennsylvania, Be it Resolved: 

First, That we the Faculty and 
students of Elizabethtown College 
express our profoundest regrets, 
that he who was so faithfully and 
unobtrusively pursuing his College 
work as a Junior, should so sudden- 
ly be summoned to that Greater 
World. 

Second, That we the entire school 
express our tenderest sympathy to 
Oliver's parents and all his friends, 
And that we pray God, that he may 
pour the oil of tranquillity into their 
bleeding hearts. 

Third, That a copy of these Reso- 
lutions be sent to the bereaved fam- 
ily, be published in "Our College 
Times" and be spread upon the Fac- 
ulty minutes. 

Elizabeth Myer, 
Stanley H. Ober, 
Clarence F. Holsopple, 

Committee. 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



College Hill Mirror 



April 1 — April Fool ! ! 

April 2 — Arbutus outing. 

April 3 — Spring ! Birds ! Flowers ! 

April 4 — Death of Oliver Fas- 
nacht in hospital. 

April 5 — Oh, that base ball game ! 

April 6 — Discovery of North Pole 
by Com. Peary-1909. 

April 7 — Art program, also Oliv- 
er Fasnacht's funeral. 

April 8, — Arbor Day. Literary 
Society Anniversary. 

April 9— Lee's surrender to 
Grant, Appomatox Court House 
Virginia-1865. 

April 10 — The return of winter! 

April 11 — Welcome students, 
new and old to the spring normal. 

April 12 — Apple blossoms every- 
where ! 

April 13 — A talk after prayer 
meeting by Bro. Hertzler. 

April 14 — Pres. Lincoln shot 
1865. 

April 15— The Y. W. W. A. Social 

April 16' — Chapel service was 
conducted by Bro. Flory. 

April 17 — Preaching at New- 
ville 

Aplir 18 — Lecture by Mr. Milaor 
of Phillipine Islands. 

April 19 — Mr. IVfilaor conducted 
chapel exercises. 

April 20 — Orioles appear in 
Maples on campus. 

April 22 — Junior Oratorical Con- 
test. 

April 30 — Spring music cantata 
entitled "Saul". 



The college campus is taking on 
a new appearance under the care of 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas. Flower 
beds are making their appearance 
at various places. The pansy bed 
around the "gym" windows adds 
much beauty to the place. The 
superintendent of grounds, Mr. Gib- 
ble, is also busy, trimming and pru- 
ning the shade trees of their sur- 
plus lower branches. Some of the 
aggressive weeds have been taken 
off the lawn and fresh grass seed 
sown. We are glad for all these 
improvements, for we want our 
Alma Mater to be a place of which 
we can be proud. 



Mr. Zug don't you like tomato 
soup? 

Mr. Zug : It would be all right if 
the tomatoes were out of it. 



Miss Hershey in history; "The 
Treace Peaty (Peace Treaty) was 
signed." 



A prize pupil in the Philippines 
was conjugating the phrase, "I have 
a gold mine," and this was the re- 
sult: 

"I have a gold mine 

"Thou hast a gold thine 

"He, she or it has a gold his, he.s 
or its mine 

"We have a gold ours 

"You have a gold yours 

"They have a gold theirs." 



If any one wants to know how to 
sit down quick just ask Jesse 
Bechtel. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



The gymnasium was the scene 
of a merry time on the even- 
ing of April 15. The Young Wo- 
men's Welfare Association gave a 
social at which the Y. M. W. A. 
were their guests. The "gym" was 
fittingly decorated with green and 
white crepe paper and dog-wood. 
Everyone was at his best and seem- 
ed to enjoy the occasion to the full. 
May these two organizations ever 
retain the same spirit toward each 
other that was manifested during 
the merry doings. 



"Did anybody comment on the 
way you handled your new car?" 

"One man did but he didn't say 
much." 

"What did he say?" 

"All he said : 'Fifty dollars and 
costs.' " 



Our Bulletin Board. 

The following boys will report to 
make up for Physical Culture ab- 
sences: Do not change dress. H. 



Mr. Beck: — "What has the con- 
cept of myself to do with myself?" 

Mr. Brandt, "What does that 
mean?" 



Mr. John Boone, of Loganton, Pa. 
was in our midst recently. Mostly 
midst though. 



"Can you keep a secret, Peggy?" 

"I can, but it's just my luck to 

tell things to other girls who can't." 



Were Forney and Weaver in a 
heathen land or whence the black 



Prof. Meyer: "What is the rela- 
tion between question 4 and 5," 

Raffie: "The one follows the 
other." 

"What is your favorite book?" 
"My bank book, but even that 
is lacking in interest these days." 



The evening of April 7 the art 
students rendered a program in col- 
lege chapel. Some features on this 
program were "Picture Reading" 
from Hiawatha, by Elizabeth Zieg- 
ler; Biography of Jean Francois 
Millet by Mildred Gish ; Pantomime, 
"The Holy City" by Velma Fike; 
Address, "Art for Art's Sake" by 
Prof. A. W, Climenhaga of Gran- 
tham, Pa. 



eyes 



E. Z.— S. O. 



April 8 was a busy day on the 
hill. In the afternoon at 2 :00, the 
seniors rendered an Arbor Day 
program after which they planted 
a tulip poplar tree as a memorial to 
their class. 

In the evening at eight o'clock 
the anniversary exercises of the 
literary societies was held in the 
College Chapel. The following 
program was given: 

Invocation 

Music — Society Song 

President's Address, C. L. Martin 

Music, Ladies' Glee Club. 

Resume of the History of the 
Three Literary Societies, Martha 
Martin. 

Recitation, Anna L. Gish. 

Music, Men's Glee Club. 

Address, "Echoes of the Tokio 
Convention, Prof. H. K. Ober. 

Music, Piano Solo, Mrs. Paul K. 
Hess. 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Alumni 



Marriages. 

Ruth G. Taylor '20, daughter of 
Elder I. W. Taylor, and Spencer 
Frey were married on Saturday 
evening, March 19, 1921. The cer- 
emony was performed at the home 
of the bride by her father in the 
presence of the immediate families. 
Mrs. Frey has been teaching a rural 
school near her home. Mr. Frey is 
a carpenter by trade. His home is 
Martinsdale, Pa. Mr. and Mrs. 
Frey will reside in Ephrata, Pa. 



Helen G. Oellig, '17, daughter of 
Elder C. R. Oellig, was married on 
Saturday evening at eight o'clock, 
April 16 to Rev. J. Irvin Thomas, of 
Lally, Ohio. The marriage was 
performed at the bride's home by 
her father. Mrs. Thomas was a stu- 
dent in Bethany Bible School but 
this year has been at home taking 
an active part in church activities. 
Mr. Thomas was a College stu- 
dent at North Manchester College. 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas will be at 
home after May first in Arcadia, 
Florida, where Rev. Thomas takes 
charge as Pastor of the church. 

To both of the above happy cou- 
ples the Editor extends the congrat- 
ulations and good wishes of their 
Alma Mater. 



Ethel B. Wentzer, '20, is teaching 
in Richland, Pa. 



Sarah H. Royer, '20, is teaching 
a large Rural School near Reams- 
town, Pa. 



Samuel G. King, '19, is the assist- 
ant manager of the Crystal Restau- 
rant in Reading, Pa. 



Ryntha Shelley, '15, is teaching 
and besides is actively engaged in 
Sunday School work. She is super- 
intendent of the Young People's 
Work of the Middle District of Pa. 
and also of the Rural Work of the 
Blair County Sunday Schools. Her 
home is in Williamsburg, Pa. 



P. B. Eshleman, '07, is farming 
near Manheim, Pa. Mr. Eshleman 
is a member of the Penn Township 
School Board which he has served 
for the past eight years. 



H. B. Rothrock, '07, is a steel- 
worker in Lewistown, Pa. Mr. Roth- 
rock has lived in the west for some 
years. He was time-keeper on a 
Sugar Ranch in California for sev- 
eral years after which he home- 
steaded in Arizona where they lived 
for five years. He has a family of 
two girls and a boy who are mem- 
bers of the College Cradle Roll. 

Jacob Z. Hackman, '13, is serving 
Mastersonville, Pa., as Postmaster 
and general merchant. He has been 
engaged in business since the date 
of his graduation. His family of 
two boys and two girls are members 
of E'town College Cradle Roll. 

Mary E. Rittenhouse, '18, Norris- 
town, Pa., is a clerk in the account- 
ing department of the Philadelphia 
and Reading Railroad in Philadel- 
phia. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



Henry L. Smith, '09, Grantham, 
Pa., is home on his first furlough 
from India. He is the Superinten- 
dent of the Brethren in Christ Mis- 
sions in North India. During his 
furlough he is teaching in the Mes- 
siah Bible School and Mission Train- 
ing Home besides making Evange- 
listic tours. It was the happy priv- 
ilege of the editor to be in attend- 
ance at a Missionary program in 
Waynesboro where Brother and 
Sister Smith both spoke. They have 
a son and daughter who are mem- 
bers of our Cradle Roll Department. 



Agnes M. Geib, '09, besides her 
household duties, is teaching a rural 
school to fill a vacancy caused by 
the shortage of teachers. Stanley 
R. Geib belongs to our Cradle Roll. 



Nellie Hartman Schuler, '06, is a 
busy mother of two sons, members 
of the E. C. Cradle Roll, who lost 
their father in the influenza epidem- 
ic in 1918. 



Christ Martin, '13, at the anniver- 
sary program of the Literary Socie- 
ties served as the Presiding Officer. 
He gave a splendid address at the 
opening of the meeting. 



Prof. H. K. Ober, '08, made a 
most interesting report of the Tokio 
Sunday School Convention at the 
same anniversary program. 



Martha Martin, '09, presented an 
excellent historical sketch of the 
Keystone, Penn and Franklin-Key- 
stone and Homerian Literary So- 
cieties at their anniversary program. 



Gertrude A. Keller, '12, has re- 
turned to her Alma Mater. She re- 
signed her position with the Treas- 
urer's Department March 15, and 
began her work as assistant Book- 
keeper the second week in April. 



Daniel Baum, '20, has returned 
for the Spring Normal Course which 
is now in session. 



SPRING. 

Joy comes, grief goes, we know not 

how; 
Everything is happy now, 
Everything is upward striving; 
'Tis as easy now for the heart to be 

true 
As for grass to be green or skies to 

be blue, 
'Tis the natural way of' living. 

— Lowell. 



The tumult and the shouing dies; 

The captains and the kings de- 
part; 
Still stands thine ancient sacrifice 

An humble and a contrite heart. 



April Showers 

Rain, rain, laughing rain, 
Tapping on my window pane; 
How I love your pitter-patter, 
And your laughter and your chatter 
As you make my window clatter — 
Tapping, tapping on the pane, 
Laughing rain! 



The Violet 

O faint, delicious, springtime violet! 

Thine odor like a key, 
Turns noiselessly in memory's words 
to let 

A thought of sorrow free. 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



EXCELSIOR 

Hornerian Literary Society 

Motto-Possunt, Quia Posse. 
Videntur." 

Colors-Garnet and Steel. 
Membership-45 members. 

Penn Literary Society 

Motto — Labor Conquers 
Things." 

Colors-Green and Gold. 
Membership-55 members. 

Franklin Literary Society 

Motto-Onward and Upward. 
Colors-Brown and White. 
Membership-55 members! 



All 



A Day in the Villages. 

A unique as well as a very in- 
structive program was rendered in 
the chapel by the Hornerian Liter- 
ary Society on the evening of April 
second. B. Mary Royer, returned 
missionary from India, who is 
spending this year with us in school, 
planned the program, making it true 
to life, as she has had actual exper- 
ience in the India Villages. 

The program was given in two 
scenes, the first of which was a vil- 
lage school. Stanley Ober dressed 
in native Indian dress was the 
teacher of the village school. He 
held a very pessimistic view as to 
the work of the foreign missionary. 
Three little girls, Elizabeth Thomas, 
Kathryn Holsinger and Mildred My- 
er, dressed in India costumes and 
Galen Schlosser, Earl Baugher and 
Emmert Herr composed the little 
school. They came into the room 
in answer to the clang of an ofti 



gong and seated themselves on the 
floor in a row. You can imagine 
the scene, little girls in red gowns, 
long skirts and a three-cornered 
scarf of some bright color tied over 
their heads, the boys wearing skull 
caps of various designs and a loose 
blouse over their other clothing. 
The school opened after a morning 
greeting. A Marathi chart on the 
wall furnished the lesson material, 
the teacher repeating some charact- 
ers and words which the children 
tried to imitate in concert. 

At this time the missionary and 
Bible woman come to visit the 
school. Elizabeth Trimmer, in 
American dress, accompanied by B. 
Mary Royer, the Bible woman in na- 
tive dress, depicted these characters 
in true India fashion. The mission- 
ary has control of the school and ac- 
cordingly begins to look over the 
record books. She discovers some 
errors in the attendance record to 
which she calls the teacher's atten- 
tion. The instructor had a slight 
knowledge of English and the mis- 
sionary talked to him in English. 
She inquired if he never taught the 
children Bible stories. As the teach- 
er was not so much inclined to do so, 
he replied, "Oh no, they will not 
like it." He tried to put blame 
on the parents saying they too 
would become angry if he did so. 
The missionary in return tells him 
that he is expected to tell and teach 
Bible stories in the school, because 
the American people were sending 
their money to help tell the stories 
to the people. Again the teacher 
assured her that they would not 
like it. The missionary insisted 
that he must tell some of the stories 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



27 



of Jesus and the teacher who could 
not talk English very fluently said: 
"Yes, I know, but if I tell them a 
story to-day, yesterday they will 
not come. Finally the teacher gave 
his permission for the Bible woman 
to tell them a story. Immediately 
the Bible woman seated herself on 
the floor, the children came up close 
about her and in real Hindu fashion 
told them in Marathi the story of 
the death of Lazarus and of Jesus' 
raising him from the dead. It was 
very interesting to us to watch the 
expression on the face of the Bible 
woman as she told the story. She 
seemed so earnest and eager to tell 
the children the story. The child- 
ren seemed much interested and 
this encouraged the missionary 
After the story the teacher promised 
to do more of this kind of teaching 
in his school because he was now 
convinced that the children liked 
the story. As it was growing late 
the missionary and Bible woman 
left. 

The next scene was a picture of 
a village home. On the rear of the 
rostrum a grass hut had been con- 
structed Minerva Reber and Vera 
Hackman, two lower caste women 
on the floor one polishing some 
household utensils by a stream of 
water. The latter seated just out- 
side the hut at an old stone mill was 
grinding rice. The Bible woman 
appeared and asked if they cared to 
have the missionary come in. They 
consented and ran into the hut to 
bring a grass mat for her to sit on. 
The missionary sat on this mat while 
the Bible woman sat on the floor 
and began talking to the women. 



Soon some village children came 
in and crept up close to listen. Fin- 
ally she told some Bible stories and 
the village teacher came slyly on 
the scene. 

More children came, one by one, 
and sat near the company. A Mo- 
hammedian woman dressed in a fine 
white dress land head cover was 
seen. Her arms were full of gold 
bands and bracelets. Her rings full 
of many colored stones flashed and 
sparkled in the light. From her 
neck hung several strings of beads. 
Her whole appearance portrayed 
the fact that she belonged to an up- 
per class. She approached very 
cautiously peering around bushes 
and corners yet trying to hear what 
was being said. She crept stealth- 
ily nearer taking care she was un- 
observed. The Bible woman then 
sang some songs in Marathi while 
her listeners gazed in wonder and 
amazement. They seemed to be ea- 
ger to hear the words as they came 
from the Bible woman. It was soon 
time to go and the scene closed as 
they left the India village. 

I thing every one present can bet- 
ter appreciate the conditions found 
in our India missions. The work of 
our missionaries can be better ap- 
preciated and our interest in that 
field is a bit more keen. 

The Homerian's are doing prac- 
tical work this year and we feel the 
student body is steadily growing. 



Art little? Do thy little well 
And for thy comfort know 
Great men can do their greatest 
work 
No better than just so. 

Goethe. 



28 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Darby Brand Canned Foods Are Quality 
Packed. Packed Exclusively For 

Comly, Flanigcn & Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 

118 & 120 So., Delaware Ave., Phila. 

Ask Your Dealer For Darby Brand 
A Trial will convince 



A. B. DRACE 
PAINTER 

AND 

PAPER HANGER 

S. Market St. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



COLLEGE JEWELRY OF THE BETTER 
SORT 

J. F. APPLE CO. 

MANUFACTURING 
JEWELER 

College and Fraternity Pins, Rings, Medals 

Prize Cups, Foot Balls, Basket Balls 

120 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. Box 570 

DR. S. J. HEINDEL & SON 

DENTIST 

Out-of-Town Friday each week 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 

OPPORTUNITIES 
HEADQUARTERS FOR MAGAZINES 

Subscriptions and Counter Sales 

Best Display in County 

THE ROOT MAGAZINE AGENCY 

21 W. High St. Elizabethtown, Pa. 



FOR PHOTOGRAPHS 

CALL AT BISHOP'S 

New and Modern Studio 

Elizabethtown, Penna. 
We Guarantee AH Work 

See us before having your diploma or those pictures framed. 

AMATEUR FINISHING SOLICITED 

EASTMAN LINE OF KODAKS AND FILMS FOR SALE 



'00000O000O0O0O00O000000O00000O0O00O0O000000O00000O0000000000( 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



29 



Franklin & Marshall College 

LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 
Offers Liberal Courses in Arts and Sciences 
Campus of 54 acres with ten buildings 
including Gymnasium and complete Ath- 
letic Field. 

For Catalogue apply to 
HENRY H. APPLE, D.D., LL.D., Pre.. 



GO TO 

HORSTS 

CENTRE SQUARE 

for 

Oysters, Ice Cream, Confectionery 



GANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor. North Queen & Orange Streets 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



Men's 
Reliable Outfitters 

Suits to measure from $35 to $65 

Ready made Suits for Young Men from 
$25.00 to $35.00 

Plain Suits Constantly on Hand from 
$25.00 to $35.00 



Waterman Fountain Pens 



—AT— 



Ream's Book Store 



Y. M. C. A. BUILDING 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



H. H. GOOD 

Central Meat Market 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 



Bell Phone 31R4 
ELIZABETHTOWN, "-:- PENNA. 

LANCASTER SANITARY MILK CO. 



PASTURIZED MILK 

AND 
CREAMERY BUTTER 



One Price — Always the Lowest 



PURITY ICE CREAM 

North and Frederick Sts. 
BOTH PHONES, LANCASTER, PA. 

CLOTHING FOR THE MAN OR BOY 

Complete line of 

SUITS & OVERCOATS 

Suits made to your measure. Men's 
furnishing a specialty. Best make of Shoe* 
of all kinds for Men, Ladies and Children. 

Agent for first-class Laundry 



J. N. OLWEILER 
Near Centre Square Elizabethtown 



30 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



EAT 

GUnzenhaUsBr's Bread 

Delivered by 

E. C. HEILMAN 

Opposite P. R. R. Station Elizabethtown 

Save Your Money by Bringing Your Shoes 

to 

E. W. MILLER 

DEALER IN SHOE FINDINGS 

All Kinds of 

Rubbers and Shoe Repairing Neatly Done 

221 South Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, :-: :-: PENNA. 



LUMBER 

AND 

MILL WORK 



We saw timbers 80 ft. and longer and 
deliver a barn complete in a couple weeks. 



B. F. Hiestand & Sons 



MARIETTA, 



PENNA. 



When In Need Of 

SHOES 

WHICH WILL GIVE YOU EXTREMELY LONG WEAR COME TO 

The W. A. Withers Shoe Co. 

OLD MARKET HOUSE BLDG. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Prompt, Careful Attention Given To Mail Orders 

'O0O0OOCXXXXX>OCXX>OCKX>0O0OCX>0OO0OO0OOOOO00O00O000O0O000O00O0O0( 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



31 



QUALITY 

LEBANON 

BOLOGNA 

Made in the Most Modern and 

Sanitary Plant 
Manufacturing this Famous Product 



"MORRIS SUPREME" 

FOOD PRODUCTS 

Advertised and known over the 
Entire World 

THE LEBANON BOLOGNA 
and 

PROVISION CO. 

D. B. Buck, Secretary and Mgr. 

H. W. Buck, Distributor 



CLASS PINS AND RINGS 

For Colleges, High Schools, Sunday 
Schools, etc. Illustrated catalog mailed 
upon request. We are also Headquarters 
for Colleges and High School pennants. 
Let us know your wants. 

UNION EMBLEM CO. 
Dept. 89, Palmyra, Pa. 




FOUWAll 



Imade on honors-built for serviceI 



Base Ball and Lawn Tennis Goodt 

Foot Ball and Basket Ball Goods 

Sporting Goods Of All Kinds 

Books, Stationery and Office 

Supplies 

DUTEWEILER 



813 Cumberland Street 



LEBANON, 



PENNA 



WHATEVER YOU NEED IN 

MERCHANDISE 

ALWAYS GO TO 

GREENBLATT'S DEPT. STORE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 
IT WILL PAY YOU 



oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooexxx>oooooooocx>oooooo6 

DEMY & DETRA 

Dealers in 

FARM IMPLEMENTS AND REPAIRS, HUBER TRACTORS, GASOLINE AND 
OIL ENGINES, HAND AND POWER PUMPS 




Ind. Phone 628 
Bell Phone 63-R2 



32 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Conducted on Sanitary Principles 

is the 

RALPH GROSS 

SHAVING PARLOR 

Agency for Manhattan Laundry 



THE BEST THERE IS IN 

HARDWARE 

At the Lowest Possible Price 
BOGGS' QUALITY HARDWARE STORE 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



LEHMAN & WOLGEMUTH 
COAL- 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED and FLOUR 
BOTH 'PHONES ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



JOHN M. SHOOKERS 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 

Repairing a Specialty 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 



Kodaks & Films Stationery 

H. K. DORSHEIMER 

Confections Athletic Goods 



ioooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo* 

PIANOS-VICTROLAS 

Musical Instruments of Every Description 
Our Line Is Complete 



32 Makes of Pianos, 40 Styles 

Victor, Cheney, Star, Franklin and Solotone Phonograph 
Popular Sheet Music 9c a Copy 



CASH OR EASY PAYMENT PLAN 



KIRK JOHNSON & CO. 

16-18 W. King Street LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



33 



GO TO 



GUY The BARBER 

HE'S ON THE SQUARE 

Kwick-Lite, Flashlights 

Kyanize, Floor Finish 



Joseph H. Rider & Son 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

FOR GOOD EATS CALL AT 

HornafuJs' Restaurant 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

OYSTERS IN SEASON 

ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO VISIT 

HIRSH & BR0. 

Centre Square, LANCASTEi 

for 
Ready-Made and Made-to-Order 

Clothing tor Men and Boys 



MEN'S FURNISHINGS 



We are one of the largest manufacturers of 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

in the United States 



Strictly One Price To All 

[ Established in 1854 



KIEFFER & LANDIS 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

Real Estate 

Insurance Collections 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



BOOKS 



BIBLES 



STATIONERY 

Phonographs 



I. A. SHIFFER 



39 S. Market St. 



Elizabethtown 



COLLE.GE, HILL DAIRY 

PURE MILK AND CREAM 

Delivered Daily 

S. G. GRAYBILL 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

H. H. BRANDT 

Dealer in all kinds of 
BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE AND 
ROOFING PAPER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



CENTRAL 
MUSIC STORE 



Victrolas, Grafonolas, Records, Stringed 
Instruments, Stationery, Kodaks, Eastman 
Films, Waterman Fountain Pens and 
Greeting cards. 

Films Developed and Printed 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



-34 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



>oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo< 

H. C. Schock, President J. E. Longenecker, V. President 

H. N. Nissly, Cashier 

SECURITY PROGRESS 

UNION NATIONAL MOUNT JOY BANK 



MOUNT JOY, 



PENNA. 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus and Profits $264,000.00 

Deposits $1,324,871.00 

An Honor Roll National Bank, Being 421 in Strength in the United States and 

2nd in Lancaster County 

Resources $2,165,000.00 

All Directors Keep in Touch With the Bank's Affairs 

The Bank Board Consists of the Following: 

H. C. Schock Eli F. Grosh I. D. Stehman Christian L. Nissley 

J. E. Longenecker John G. Snyder J. W. Eshleman Johnson B. Keller 

T. M. Breneman Eli G. Reist Samuel B. Nissley S. N. Mumma 

Rohrer Stoner 

WE PAY 4% INTEREST ON CERTIFICATES AND SAVINGS 



SCHMIDT 
BAKERY 



Harrisburg, Pa. 



PRINTING 



For Schools, Colleges, Etc. is our hobby. 
The fact that we have a city equipped 
printing office in a country town, is suf«- 
ficient evidence that we can do satis- 
factory work and last but not least, our 
prices are right. At present we are print- 
ing many monthlies for schools thruout 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This book- 
let is the product of our office. If the work 
appeals to you, get our price on your 
publication. 



The BULLETIN 

Jno. E. Schroll, Propr. 

MOUNT JOY, PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



35 



THE WILLEY COMPANY INC. 

Superior Laundry Machinery 



factory Columbia, penna. 



OFFICE PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



109 East King Street 




Lancaster, Pcnna. 



JACOB FISHER 

8 Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
WATCHMAKER & JEWELER 
With you for 40 years that's all 
From 10 to 20 per cent. lower than the 
lowest for the same grade of make. 




Seller's Kitchen Cabinet, the best ser- 
vant in your house. I have just received 
a half car load of above cabinets, which I 
will sell at Special reductions. Call and 
see the Cabinet, and get prices. 



R. D. 2 



H. S. HOTTENSTEIN, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



HERSHEY TRUST CO. 

HERSHEY, PENNA. 
Capital, Surplus and Profits $425,000.00 
Resources $3,500,000.00 
■ OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 
M. S. Hershey, President 
W. H. Lebhicker, V. Pres. 
Ezra F. Hershey, V. Pres. 
S. C. Stechon, Treas. 
John A. Landis U. G. Risser, M.D. 

J. B. Leithiser John E. Snyder 

Wm. F. R. Murrie A. W. Stauffer 

Commercial Banking Department 
Saving Department Trust Department 

LARGEST CIRCULATION AND 
ADVERTISING PATRONAGE 

Elizabethtown Chronicle 

Fifty-one Years Old and Still Young 



Garrett, Miller & Co. 



Electrical 
Supplies 



N. E. Cor. Fourth & Orange Sts. 
WILMINGTON, -:- -:- DELAWARE 



36 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



iSOOQGOQOOOOQOOQOOOQOQOOOOOOQOOGQOOOOOQOOOOOOOOQOQOOOOOOOOOOOQ 

Hertzler's Department Store 

N. E. CORNER CENTRE SQUARE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 




Always Ready to Supply Your Needs Satisfactorily in 
DRY GOODS, STAPLE AND FANCY NOTIONS, BEST GROCERIES, FRUITS, 
SWEETMEATS, SHOES, WINDOW SHADES, QUEENSWARE, MEN'S 
WOMEN'S, BOYS' AND GIRL'S CLOTHING, OIL CLOTH, LINO- 
LEUM, CARPETS, RUGS, ETC. 

Goods displayed on three floors and separate carpet store, three doors 
east of Post Office. 

Agents for made to measure clothing — International Tailoring Co. of New 
York. 

We carry full stocks notwithstanding the great difficulty in obtaining 
goods at these high prices. 

Long experience in merchandising goe with prices of goods purchased here. 

HERTZLER BROS. 



> 000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000' 



joooqooocooooogogqoooooqqgqqcooooc^qooqgoogoqqc 

J. Hoffman Garber Benj. F. Garber 

GARBER GARAGE 



Bell Phone 43R2 

AUTHORIZED 

SALES 

AND 

SERVICE 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 




Our Repair Department Is Complete with the Latest Ford Approved Machinery 
Ford Prices Used All Work Guaranteed 

OOOOOCXX>OOOOOOOOOOOOOC50000COOOOOOOOOOOCKXKK5000CX>CXKXXXX50 




GENUINE 

FORD 

PARTS 

ACCESSORIES 



ocolate 

Almond Bars 



"The Milkiest Kind of 



Chocolate 



»» 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOGOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOOOOO 

MUTH BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN 

Coal, Flour, feed and lumber 

Our Special Domino Feed 

We aim to give a square deal that will merit 
your trade and friendship 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENNA. 

b0OO0O0OO00000OOO00OOOCX5O0O00CCK5000OOO0O0O0OOO0OOOO0C0OO0OOO0^ 



i|0CX)0<XX>0CXXXXXX>OO0OOO0OOOOOOO0OOOC<K>OO00OO0OO0<XXXX>000000O00j 

SPECIAL SUMMER SESSION 

— FOR— 

PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS 



NINE WEEKS 
June 20, 1921-August 20, 1921 



A Wonderful Opportunity 

Special efforts will be put forth to give the best professional 
training obtainable. Only experienced instructors have been en- 
gaged to do the teaching during this special term. The wishes of 
the state department will be complied with in every detail possible. 

Regular work in Preparatory Subjects and College Subjects 
will also be offered, according to demand. 

Write for any further information desired, stating the sub- 
jects in which you are interested. 



Address ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



)dOOOOCXX)OOOOOOOOOCGOOO^^ 



VOL. XVII NUMBER 6 

Senior IRumbev 



©ur 
College ^imee 

1921 



Our College Times is published monthly during the Academic year by Elizabeth- 
town College. 

This paper will have to be discontinued as soon as the time of subscription expires 
as an action of the United States legislature. 

Please renew in time and report any change of address to the business manager. 

Subscription rates one dollar per year; fifteen cents per copy; six subscriptions 
$5.00. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



TO 
PROF. JACOB S. HARLEY 



Our cherished teacher and ad- 
viser, Ave, the class of 1921, grate- 
fully dedicate this Senior issue of 
Our College Times as a token of 
loyalty and appreciation. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




PROFESSOR JACOB S. HARLEY 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Prof. Jacob S. Harley 



Prof. Jacob S. Harley, to whom we respectfully dedicate the Senior 
number of Our College Times and who has been a member of the 
faculty for about nine years, was born and bred among the hills of 
Montgomery County. His early education was acquired in the public 
schools of that county. In his youth he was very fond of books and 
this desire for learning has followed him throughout his later life. 

Prof. Harley has spent the greater part of his life in the school- 
room, both as a teacher and as a student. In 1892 he graduated at 
Juniata College. In two and one half years he had completed the 
Normal English Course. Among his instructors while here were Martin 
G. Brumbaugh and Frances H. Green. After graduating from Juniata, 
Prof. Harley took up the profession of teaching and taught twelve 
years in a little red school house in Montgomery County. 

For four years Prof. Harley engaged in the manufacturing business, 
but as his heart was in his profession he resumed teaching. While in 
the manufacturing business he showed ability as an inventive genius, 
but he chose rather to mold and shape young, growing lives than fol- 
low this line of work. 

In 1907 he was a teacher in Lordsburg College, California, now 
known as LaVerne College. From here he went to Stanford University 
where he received his A.B. degree. After his graduation in 1910 he 
came to Elizabethtown College as a member of the faculty, and has 
been with us ever since, with the exception of one and one half years 
spent in graduate work at the University of Pennsylvania and at Co- 
lumbia University, New York. Prof. Harley has received his A.M. from 
Columbia and has completed all the resident work for his Ph.D. at the 
University of Pennsylvania. As a result of his study in both eastern 
and western universities he is a man of broad culture and wide ex- 
perience. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Prof. Harley is a man of wide interests and for that reason is to- 
day a student among students, always learning and helping others to 
learn. He is a lover of nature and delights to be in the great out-of- 
doors and, like Bryant, commune with the visible forms of nature. 
Professor is a great lover of young people and has their interests at 
heart. Because of this love and interest he endures their pranks and 
interruptions to the verge of leniency. 

Professor's favorite study is the English language. His diction, his 
wealth of words, and his perfect choice of words have enabled many 
to see the real beauty of the English language. His depth of thought 
and his keenness of mind have been a challenge to all students who 
have taken work under him. His clean Christian life is a worthy ex- 
ample to all who know him. Professor in his quiet, modest way has 
influenced for the right many a student's life. Because of his quiet, 
unassuming manner one does not upon first acquaintance see the ad- 
mirable qualities of this professor of ours. 

Professor is loved and respected not only by students and teachers 
but by all those who know him. Many of the students were young and 
inexperienced when they came to school, and the very thought of de- 
bating or reciting made their hearts beat faster. Professor Harley was 
the one to whom they turned for help and advice. Though almost 
overwhelmed with the many duties of classroom work, College Times 
work and literary society work, yet Professor Harley seldom turns 
away those who seek advice and help. 

His faithful efforts are appreciated by all students, and may all who 
come in touch with him show their gratitude by living out the noble 
ideals and principles which he upholds. 

May Professor Harley have many more years of successful teaching 
and may peace and happiness be his throughout his entire life. 

J. O. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Editorial Board 



Editor-in-Chief 

Horace Raffensperger 

Assistant Editor 

Harriet Eberly 

Associate Editors 

Jessie Oellig Irene Stamen Minerva Reber 

Laura Hershey Arthur Moyer 

f Lottie Nies 

Art Editors 

Nathan Meyer Grant Weaver 

Class Poets 

| Nathan Meyer Jessie Oellig 

Ephraim Meyer (Composer) 

Business Manager 

Rudolph Ziegler 

Class Prophets 

Stanley Ober Vera Hackman 

Historian 

Elizabeth Trimmer 

Assistants 

Laura Moyer Lottie Nies Chester Royer 

Athletics 

O. M. Zendt 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Our Faculty 



Every institution has a group of persons known as a faculty whose 
duty it is to manage the school affairs as well as instruct the students. 
In many schools this group consists of a group of high salaried persons 
who, because of some scheme of political machinery, or perhaps thru 
the old method of a line of kings, have inherited the positions of honor 
as faculty members of the institution. 

This is not the case with our faculty. It is not the great salaries that 
appeal to them. It is not the desire for authority that prompts them 
to serve us here. But, it is that burning desire within them to be of 
a real service to humanity. Their wages are comparatively little. 
There are scarcely any of them that could not earn much more in 
other professions or in other places even by following the same pro- 
fession. But, for them to see the young lives grow while here on the 
hill, for them to realize that those that have been here as students 
and out in active life are making good not only as professional men 
and women, but as loyal citizens and Christian workers, this is the 
salary that means much more to our devoted faculty than wages. Our 
senior class will ever foster and uphold the high ideals for which our 
faculty has been striving. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




OUR FACULTY 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 





JOHN SHERMAN 

Berks County, Pa. 

"Sherman" 

President of Class; Homerian Literary 
Society; President of Tennis Association. 

While John was gaining knowledge in 
high school he spent most of his time driv- 
ing speedy pacers all alone. His father 
fearing his only son would neglect his edu- 
cation finally succeeded to attract him by 
College tales to Elizabethtown. He spent 
a few years here adjusting himself to Col- 
lege life. Then he went for one year to 
put into practice what he learned in 
psychology and pedagogy. This year he 
returned to finish the pedagogiial course. 
He says "he is glad he returned this year 
because he formed new bonds which we 
are sure will last. 

The world has a big place for Sherman. 
We'll hear of him later. 

Favorite Expression — "Is that so?" 

Matrimonial Prospects — Rather bright, 
as he has one steady regular girl. 

Favorite Song — "Feather your nest." 



PAUL MARKLEY 
Lexington, Pa. 

This Goliath of the class hails from 
Lexington, Pa. He graduated at Roths- 
ville High School and in the fall of 1920 
he came to Elizabethtown where he 
finished the commercial course. During 
his stay here he not only acquired com- 
mercial knowledge, but he also accepted 
Jesus Christ, which makes him go on his 
way rejoicing. 

Favorite Expression; — Oh Gosh! 

Peculiarity — Rhythmical walk. 

Pastime — Juggling with figure. 




OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 




ANNA ENTERLINE 
Rheems, Pa. 



This lassie hails from Rheems. She came 
here to develop her special music talent 
and is now completing the piano course. 
If we could look into the future we could 
undoubtedly see her holding a prominent 
position as piano instructor in one of our 
Colleges. 

She is a day student and enjoys going 
back and forth in the "Saxon" with her 
father or brother at the steering wheel. 

Favorite Pastime — Au-omobiling. 



LAURA MOYER 

Lansdale. Pa. 

"Lolly Pop" 

Homerian Society; Volunteer Band. 

This little dark-eyed girl comes from 
that country where the Montgomery pies 
grow. She is very fortunate in having her 
sister occupy the position of head cook. 
That's the reason she doesn't grow; she 
eats too much. 

Miss Moyer was here before and so could 
easily fall in line again this year. She 
went to Lansdale High School two years, 
came to Elizabethtown College a few 
years. She then went to prove her suc- 
cess as a teacher and returned this year to 
finish the pedagogical course. She expects 
to teach again next year. 

Favorite Expression — Oh Peanuts! 

Favorite Country — Montgomery County. 

Strong Point — Talking. 

Favorite Pastime — Tell stories; chase 
mice in her room. 

Matrimonial prospect — Poor hopes. 




12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




STANLEY OBER 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 

"Shrimp" 

Homerian Literary Society. 

Stanley is one of those restless sort of 
fellows always laughing - or guying some- 
one. We are sorry he has such a nervous 
disposition, but we can't blame him for it 
started when Zendt became his rival and 
successor, and we will have to be a little 
patient with him until he will forget this 
defeat. 

He is a faithful day student and super- 
intendent of the Newville Sunday School. 
He is a hard worker and sticks to his work 
thru rain or shine, heat and cold. 

This young chap completes the College 
Preparatory course and will be a College 
Freshie next year. We predict a bright 
future for the brilliant young man. 

Pastime — Play base ball. 

Favorite Expression — Good Lover. 

Bad Habit — Slapping anyone on the 
head when he feels nervous. 

Matrimonial Prospects — Gloomy at 
present. 

Greatest Need — A girl at once. 



EPHRAIM GIBBLE MEYER 

Fredericksburg, Pa. 

"Eph" 

Homerian Literary Society; Volunteer 
Band. 

This is E. G's. home, for he must be 
here longer than he was with his parents. 
But nevertheless his time spent here was 
very profitably spent. He came when a 
baby and prepared to teach school. After 
two years of successful teaching he came 
back to finish the pedagogical course. # 

We shall always have fond memories of 
Mr. Meyer, for he appeared before us 
very often singing solos or singing in the 
College Male Quartet in which he served 
as second tenor for five successive years. 
He has special talent along the line of 
music. 

Early in the morning the birds even get 
inspiration and imitate his melodious voice. 

Besides finishing the music teacher's 
course, he composed the class and arbor 
day songs, and has charge of a singing 
school at Bareville. 

Pastime — Visit very intimate friends at 
Brownstown. 

Favorite Song — "Daddy." 

Future Vocation — Singing evangelist. 




OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 




B. MARY ROYER 
Richland, Pa. 

Homerian Literai'y Society; Volunteer 
Band; Returned Missionary from India. 

We are very happy to mingle in class 
and otherwise with this returned mission- 
ary who possesses such a cheery disposition 
and kind-hearted nature. We can easily 
understand why heathen boys and girls 
love her so much. She adds so much to 
each recitation by asking the teacher im- 
portant question which lead to helpful dis- 
cussions. She can very ably discuss social 
problems because of her broad experience. 

She had been here before and finished 
the English Scientific course. She also 
finished a Bible course at Dr. White's Bible 
School in New York, and now she com- 
pletes the pedagogical course. 

Till Fall she expects to return to India 
and put into practice what she learned 
in the educational subjects she studied 
here. We wish her God speed and hope to 
hear from her often. 

The reason she is not married is because 
a man's handwriting wasn't up to her 
standard. 

Favorite Pastime — Walk ~% a mile for 
her meals; and try to conceal her age. 

.Favorite Expression — Well, Bless you! 



NATHAN GIBBLE MEYER 
Fredericksburg, Pa. 

"Nate" 

Homerian Society; Volunteer Band. 

What would the class of '"21" do with- 
out this bright chap, who is bright in ev- 
ery sense of the word for he shines in the 
darkest night, and still better he shines as 
an orator, poet and naturalist; and every- 
thing he tries he can do very ably, even 
speak (to) "Frantz." 

He is always smiling; never seems to 
have troubles. He finishes the Pedagogical 
Course and since he can't get enough el- 
bow room in Pennsylvania, he is going to 
New York state as a supervising principal 
of a grammar school. 

Favorite Pastime — Reading and Study- 
ing. 

Matrimony— Coming nicely. 

Favorite Expression — "Oh, ha, ha. 




14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




GRANT E. WEAVER 

Somerset County, Pa. 

Weaver 



Homerian Literary 
Volunteer; Minister. 



Society; Foreign 



Grant came from his home in Somerset 
County to Elizabethtown in the fall of 
1914. In 1917 he completed the English 
Scientific course. Then he taught school 
and served in the training camp. In the 
fall of 1920 he retrned to his Alma Mater 
to complete the Pedagogical Course. 

Mr. Weaver expects to go to a foreign 
land as an agricultural missionary some 
day. We wish him God's blessing. 

Favorite Expression — "Come on now." 

Favorite Pastime — Go walking with the 
cook. He has reasons. 

Strong Point — Arguing 1 . 
Matrimonial Prospect — Still Hope. 



< 



RUDOLPH ZIEGLER 

Rehrersburg, Pa. 

"Zieg" 

Literary Society. 

Rudolph made his first appearance a few 
years ago, having graduated from a three 
year high school. After gaining a little 
pedagogical knowledge he went into the 
little red Schoolhouse to give out what he 
knew. But he soon became exhausted and 
came back to get filled with more know- 
ledge, however knowledge of a different 
type. He completes the commercial course 
and next year will be a Junior in the 
Teacher's Commercial course. 

Some day he will be at the head of the 
commercial department of Elizabethtown 
College. 

Pastime — Fiddling and correcting rapid 
calculation paper. 




OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 




MABEL LICHTY 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 

This blue-eyed damsel is one of our day 
students who has come here during the 
fall of 1920 from her home school to 
finish the commercial course. 

No one, even she doesn't know what she 
is going to do next year. That just de- 
pends on him. 

Noted for Blushing. 

Favorite Pastime — Rapid calculation. 



MINERVA IRENE REBER 

Ridgely, Md. 

"Nervy" "Minnie" 

Homerian Literary Society, Volunteer 
Band, Basket Ball, Glee Club. 

Minerva is the only one of our number, 
who does not hail from the Keystone State. 
And she is proud of the fact. 

This dark haired, blue eyed lass was 
graduated from Ridgely High School 1919; 
the next fall she joined our ranks and is 
now completing the Pedagogical Course. 
If she is a fair sample of all the girls of 
the Eastern Shore, it must be a pretty 
good place to live, for she is always jolly, 
full of fun, and energetic especially at the 
base ball games. 

When Judy and Nervy have their heads 
together, we know that something is in 
the air and is sure to happen. 

Although she likes it fairly well in Lan- 
caster County, yet we believe her prefer- 
ence is Lebanon County. 

Favorite Expression — "You bet you." 

Pastime — "Playing- Tennis." 

Strong Point — "Rooting" 

Matrimonial Prospects — You can't some- 
times alwavs tell. 




16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




LAURA S. FRANTZ 

Richland, Pa. 

"Lolly" 

Penn Literary Society, Glee Club. 

Laura is one of those good-natured 
girls, who are never cross or impatient. 
She always has time to help those who are 
in need. Especially when her room-mate 
is annoyed by the mice. 

Lolly seems to be interested in the Ped. 
Seniors. We wonder why? 

Laura came here in the fall of 1919, 
commencing on the Pedagogical Course, 
but later on changed to the Stenographic 
Course, which she is now finishing. We 
know that she will make good and we wish 
her the greatest success in her future 
work. 



Favorite 
-traps." 



Pastime — "Setting mouse 



Favorite Expression — "Oh My." 
Matrimonial Prospects — "Very Promis- 



ing. 



JESSE MAE OELLIG 
Waynesboro, Pa. 
"Judy" or "Jute" 

Secretary of Y. W. W. A.; Homerian 
Society, Glee Club; Basket Ball. 

This "jolly young lass graduated from 
Waynesboro High School 1919. She con- 
tinued her education by coming here in the 
fall and is now very successfully finish- 
ing the Pedagogical Course. 

Judy is an all around girl, "Little but 
Oh My." Whenever there was a trick 
played on any one, you could depend upon 
it that little Jute had a hand in it. But 
this only goes to show the fact that, 
"impression without expression makes for 
depression." 

She is little but is far from the least 
in skill and in ability, for she successfully 
accomplishes whatever she undertakes. In 
Philosophy Judy is one of Professor 
Meyer's faithful few. 

Favorite Song — "All Hail to Thee 
Emmanuel." 

Expression — "Fto Goodness," "Power- 
ful Nice." 

Pastime — "Playing Tricks." 

Matrimonial Prospects — "Encouraging." 



t 




OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 




MARY W. CROUSE 

Myerstown, Pa. 

"Molly" 

Volunteer Band, Franklin Literary So- 
ciety. 

This industrious young- lady hails from 
Berks County. We have all learned to 
love her for her kind and sweet dispo- 
sition. 

Molly has the honor of being- the last 
and only member to complete the English 
Scientific Course. Mary erpects to con- 
tinue her work at Bethany next year, and 
we feel assured that she will some day com- 
fort the sick in the heathen lands. 

The class wishes her the best success 
in anything she undertakes. 

Pastime — "Visiting the Cottage." 

Strong Point — "Perseverance." 

Favorite Expression — "Och." 

Greatest Need — "A man." 



MARY V/OLGEMUTH 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Franklin Literary Society. 

This happy-go-lucky, yet brilliant girl 
joined us in the fall. She is finishing the 
Complete Commercial Course. 

Mary is a great help and inspiration to 
Miss Bonebrake in her shorthand classes. 
We can predict a successful future from 
the experience which she alraady has had 
along the commercial line. 

Mary is very fond of Basket Ball and 
is always ready for a good time. 

We wonder why she prefers Franklin 
County to Lancaster. It also seems 
strange that she prefers a Hr.rsh (man) to 
a gentleman. 

Song — "My Island of Golden Dreams." 

Greatest Need — "Some one to furnish 
her with hair nets." 

Prospects — "Very Bright." 




18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




LOTTIE J. NIES 
Lititz, Pa. 
"Landanie" 

Voluntee Band, Homerian Literary So- 
ciety, Glee Club, Basket Ball. 

This blue-eyed important young lady 
hails from the "Great Town of Lititz," 
where she graduated from the Lititz High 
School 1917. The following fall she came 
to College Hill. She was here one year 
after which she decided to teach. After 
teaching two years she came back to com- 
plete the Pedagogical Course. 

If Lottie is wanted and cannot be found, 
you can depend upon it, she is having a 
committee meeting. 

She is much enthused in outdoor sports 
and is loyal to her class, which can be 
seen by her cheering and rooting at Base 
Ball games. 

Laudanie is never known to remain 
quiet for a very long time. 

Great Need— "Alarm Clock." 

Strong - Point — "Letting herself be 
heard." 

Expression — "Oh Help." 

Matrimonial Prospects — "Getting Bet- 
ter." 

Favorite Pastime — Practicing Mixed 
Quartettes. 



4 



RUTH E. BURKHOLDER 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Franklin Literary Society. 

We are glad to welcome to our ranks, a 
very small dark-haired lady; although she 
is small in stature, we know she will some 
day find some one who will add to her 
stature 

Ruth appeared on College Hill last fall 
1919, and returned again this year to 
finish the Stenographic Course. 

The class wishes her success as she at- 
tends to her duties of a little office girl. 

Expression — "Good Night." 

Pastime — "Book Keeping" (?) 

Favorite Dish — "Baked Beans." 

Matrimonial Prospects — "Doubtful." 




i 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 




LENA LANDIS 
Rheems, Pa. 



Franklin Society. 

Lena is one of our faithful day students. 
She was added to our number last fall. 

No matter what the conditions may be, 
you can be sure to see her at her post of 
duty bright and early. 

She has won for herself the respect of 
her classmates by her sweet and kind dis- 
position. We feel assured that she will 
win some one else by the same. 

Lena is completing- the Stenographic 
Course this year. 

Pastime — "Automobiling. 

Favorite occupation — "Peeling Oranges." 

Prospects — "Encouraging." 



SALLIE MAE GROFF 

Talmage, Pa. 

"Groff" 

Franklin Literary Society. 

Sallie graduated from West Earl High 
School, 1920. The following fall she ap- 
peared at Elizabethtown. 

The commercial course would be at a 
great loss without this bright young lady. 
It is not only an honor but a great con- 
venience that Sallie is bright, for there 
are many things she enjoys more than 
studying. She takes great delight in 
running the "Fliver" when at home, but a 
greater delight in reading letters from 
Oregon when at School. 

She is finishing the complete commercial 
course. 

Favorite Expression — "Oh pshaw." 

Favorite Song — "Micky." 

Dislike — "Tomatoes." 

Strong Point — "Hard Study" (?) 




20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




RUTH FOGELSANGER 

Shippensburg, Pa. 

rogi 

Franklin Literary Society. 

This jolly little maiden, who is finishing 
the stenographic course, has been with us 
one year. 

Fogi is very fond of being with a 
crowd, but one thing which puzzles us very 
much is that she enjoys a group of (one) 
on Sunday afternoon from three to five. 
She is a cure for the blues and is especial- 
ly noted for her originality in sports. How- 
ever she has one weak point that is, that 
she is worried whenever a special program 
is announced for Newville. 

Fogi expects to work in an office for a 
while, but we feel assured that the future 
has something better in store for her. 

Expression — "Oh boys" "I am crooking" 

Song — "Garner Them In." 

Greatest Need — "A Home of her own." 



1 



AMY GIBBLE 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

"Ami" 

Penn Literary Society. 

At the beginning of the fall term a lit- 
tle blue-eyed lass from Dauphin County 
ventured her way to College Hill, where 
she is now finishing the Stenographic 
Course. 

Ami is a very care-free girl; she never 
needs to worry. When the Lectures come 
along. The class of '21 would seem lost 
if she were not among its ranks. 

We know she will make good, as she 
has a "Cable" handy when ever anything 
unusual happens in the office. 

Wanted — "Another class pin for her 
own wear." 

Expression — "Oh, take it as a joke." 
Favorite Dish — "Chocolate Candy from 

< )?" 

Future — "Rather Bright." 




OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 




EMMA K. Z1EGLER 

Hatfield, Pa. 

"Emma Kate" 

Corresponding Secretary of Volunteer 
Band, Homerian Literary Society, Chorus 
Class. 

Emma has a host of friends wherever 
she goes. She always finds friends, be- 
cause she has learned the secret of being 
a true friend. Her kind disposition and 
sterling character are esteemed by all who 
know her. 

Emma Kate came here in the fall of 
1912. She taught the following year but 
seeing the value of more training she de- 
cided to come back to her Alma Mater in 
1918. She is now completing the Pedagog- 
ical course. 

Emma expects to teach a few years and 
then continue her education at Bethany for 
greater service in the mission field. The 
class of '21 wish her much success in her 
work. 

Favorite Songs — "Farewell to thee" 
"Till He Returns" 

Favorite Expression — "Fiddlesticks." 

Greatest Need — "Stilts f or Jier partner." 

Future— "Excellent." 



ARTHUR TYSON MOYER 

Landsdale, Pa. 

"Doc" 

Volunteer Band, Homerian Literary So- 
ciety, Tennis Manager. 

"A full rich nature, free to trust. 

Truthful and almost sternly just." 

"Doc" came to us in the fall of this 
year, with a spirit full of life. He has 
given of his time and suggestions very 
freely to all the activities of the class. It 
is one of his rules of life to develop four 
square, and he has shown remarkable de- 
velopment in all lines, while here at school. 
We can always tell when he is in any game 
of athletics. Cross country hiking is an- 
other favorite sport of his. In religious 
activities he has been taking advantage of 
all opportunities presented. He hopes to 
teach next year, but whatever he does, we 
are sure he will be a success and we as a 
class wish him Godspeed in all his under- 
takings. 

Favorite expression — "Oh shad!" 

Known for — "Pep." 




22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 





KATHRYN KAYLOR 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 

"Kaddie" 



Franklin Society. 

Kathryn listed her name among the stu- 
dents of E. C. for the first time in the 
fall of 1919. She has a jolly disposition 
and they say she talks quite a bit when 
among those of her own flock. There is 
a natural tendency in her, it seems, to be 
interested in Uncle Sam's doughboys. In 
the future her interests will be confined 
to office work and we feel sure that she 
will prove efficient in it. 



4 



Favorite Expression- 
take crust." 



-"Now doesn't that 



Matrimonial Prospects — Promising. 



REBA REAM 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Franklin Society. 

When you wish to find beauty and hu- 
mor, as well as intelligence and helpful- 
ness, come to this brown-eyed lassie. She 
graduated from High School in the year 
1919. Her worth as a stenographer has al- 
ready been proven as she is working for 
a few days out of each week in an office 
in Mount Joy. In this profession we shall 
expect to find her for a few years until 
the male appears. 

Favorite Pastime — Keeping a diary. 

Wanted — A hair net. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 




VERNA MAE SEIDERS 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 

"Sei" 



Franklin Society. 

You wonder why our class looks so 
healthy? Listen! We have among our num- 
ber a trained nurse having graduated at 
Bainbridge Private Hospital, Philadelphia. 

She comes to us as a day student but 
is always seen on the hill early and late 
attending to some committee work or 
planning work for the Commercials. We 
can always depend upon her when there 
is some work to be done. Her future work 
a willing worker wherever she is found, 
a willing worker wherever shs is found. 

Favorite Expression — "Oh gosh!" 



OLIVER MILTON ZENDT 

Souderton, Pa. 

"Ollie" 

Volunteer Band; Vice President of class; 
Penn Society. 

"I firmly believe in co-education." 

Here's to the giant of our class. "Ollie" 
came to school when only fourteen years 
old and we feel sure that by this time he 
has become used to all the rules and regu- 
lations of the hill. 

He has developed many of his latent pos- 
sibilities while here which will be of use to 
him when he gets out into the world. 

"Ollie" expects to continue his educa- 
tion, and possibly he will be heard from at 
Manchester next year. 

Success to you in your work, "Ollie." 

Known as — A good sport. 

Favorite study — Virgil (?) 

Favorite Expression — "I'll break your 
neck." 




24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




VERA REGENS HACKMAN 

Bareville, Pa. 

"Vera" 

Volunteer Band; President Y. W. W. A. 
Homerian Literary Society. 

There is no genius like the genius of 
energy and industry." 

Vera appeared on the hill for the first 
time in the fall of 1919. She is a unique 
personality and we feel that she was 
needed to complete the list of various 
types and personalities represented in our 
class. 

Everyone will remember Vera as the 
teachers' standby. She expects to teach 
next year after which she will continue 
her education. 

In the future she will no doubt be found 
teaching somewhere in Africa. We pray 
God may guide her in her work. 

Favorite Expression — "Goodness grac- 
ious!" 

Matrimonial Prospects- 



Hard to tell. 



HARRIET MINNICH EBERLY 

Lititz, Pa. 

"Pats" 

Homerian Literary Society; Treasurer 
of class; Glee Club; Basket Ball. 

"Got four and wants some more." 

Who does not know her? We feel sure 
everyone who has ever met her knows that 
unique cought caused probably by a weak 
throat ( ? ) "Pats" graduated at Lititz in 
1917 and came to school the fall term of 
the same year. After being here two 
years she taught school one year near Nevv 
Holland, Lancaster County. She says she 
expects to follow the same profession next 
year but who can tell what a day may 
bring forth! However we hope that as 
she wishes she may some day realize her 
wish to become a teacher of music and 
art. 

t need — A man. 

8 n Hill. 

Favorite Study— "Philosophy?" 




OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 




HORACE E. RAFFENSPERGER 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 

"Raffle" 

Homerian Literary Society; Captain of 
Basket Ball and Base Ball. 

"The good die young. 

My, I must take care of myself. 

"Raffie" came to school in the fall of 
1917. From the very beginning of his 
career here on the hill, he has shown, 
strong marks of intelligence. In initiative 
and executive ability he is hard to beat. 
He expects to finish his college course and 
then become a principal of a high school. 
We are sure that here he shall make use 
of his talents and we predict for him a 
successful future. 

Favorite Expression — "I hope to told 
you." 

Matrimonial Prospects — Sold. 



BLANCHE S. HEGE 

Williamson, Pa. 

"Hege" 



Franklin Society. 

This is the sweet little disposition of the 
class. Quiet and unassuming she pursues 
her work without any extra fuss or com- 
motion. She came to us at the beginning 
of the year and adds to the class some- 
thing which without her would be want- 
ing. Her ambition for the present is to be 
an efficient stenographer. We hope her 
future may be bright and her life success- 
ful. 

Favorite Expression — '.'Oh good-night." 




26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




CHESTER HUMMER ROYER 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 

"Chet" 

President of Volunteer Band, College 
Quartette, Homerian Literary Society. 

"The fineness a hymn or psalm affords 

is when the soul into the lines accords." 

We feel proud of the only one in our 
class who has already launched his bark 
upon the sea of matrimony and today is 
the father of a laughing Allegra. He is 
very industrious and we can seldom get 
anything but a passing glance at him as 
he goes about his duties. 

He came to school in 1914 after which 
he taught school two years. 

As president of the Volunteer Band and 
in all religious activities he is always on 
the job. Although his future is not 
planned definitely we as a class pray God's 
blessing upon him in his future life. 

Favorite Excuse — Gardening. 

Favorite Expression — "Oh come on 



LAURA GROFF HERSHEY 



Lit; : 



Fc 



"He shey" 

Secretary of Volunteer Band, Homerian 
Literarv Societv. Secret?vv of class, Glee 
Club, Basket Ball, Secretary of Athletic 
Association. 

"She has an eye that could speak, 

Though her tongue were silent." 

This young lady hails from the famous 
Hershey family of Lititz, and is a member 
of the 1919 class of the same town. She 
is completing the Pedagogical Course this 
year and is planning to teach next year. 
She is an active church worker and we 
shall never forget some of the fine in- 
spiring talks she has given us while here 
at school. In a few years we expect to 
hear from her as a student at Manchester 
or Bethany. We bid her Godspeed in all 
she shall undertake. 

Avocation — Athletic?. 

Favorite Country — "0. Z." 

Favorite Expression — "Your're some 
guy." 




OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



27 




ELIZABETH VIRGINIA TRIMMER 

Lititz, Pa. 

"Beth" 

Homeriaii Literary Society, Glee Club, 
Basket Ball. 

"Hard to learn to know, but well worth 
while." 

"Browneyed Betty" is a contribution 
from the. town of Lititz, an alumna of the 
1919 class of that town. Altho apparently 
very quiet we are sometimes alarmed by 
the shrieks which are heard emanating 
from the corner-room, third floor, Alpha 
Hall. "Beth" is finishing the Ped. Course. 
She says she expects to follow the teach- 
ing profession thru the remainder of her 
life, however we think she will specialize 
in a year or two. The best wishes of the 
1921 class go with her. 

Favorite Dish — Beans ? ? ? 

Favorite Pronoun — H. E. R. 

Favorite Expression — -Now mind! 



28 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




SEWING CLASS 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



29 



The Sewing Department 



The Sewing Department was in- 
troduced into the Elizabethtown 
College in the year 1910, and has 
filled a big place in the College 
ever since. The class of 1921 con- 
sists of seventeen members. Seven 
of these are boarding students who 
are taking this work with their 
other literary work. The other 
members of the class live in and 
around Elizabethtown, and came to 
the College twice a week for in- 
struction. 

The names of the members of the 
class are Maud Nolt, Irene Stehman, 
Stella Wenger, Sarah Moyer, Vel- 
ma Fike, Beula Shirk, Elsie Landis, 
Dorothy Fry, Mary Good, Minnie 
Good, Eva Emenheiser, Sara Mark, 
Miriam Hoffer, Rhoda Newcomer, 
Barbara Hollinger, Stella Eshleman 
and Verna Koser. La Rue Hart, a 
boarding student, was also taking 
up this line of work, but w r as not 
able to finish the course on account 
of ill health. 

The class owe all their success to 
the untiring efforts of Miss Flor- 
ence T. Moyer. Her instruction will 
be of great value to the class in the 
future. 

The class have been very in- 
dustrious, and have always looked 



on the bright side of their diffi- 
culties. Among the articles made 
by the class this year we find sewing 
bags, undergarments, waists dress- 
es, baby garments, fancy work, 
shirts and coats. The class have 
also made note-books which they 
filled with samplers and sewing 
notes. 

The class were permitted to en- 
joy several outings to the homes of 
several of the members of the class. 
While there the class took part in 
puzzles, contests and games and en- 
joyed the refreshments which were 
served afterward. 

As a proof to the school that this 
department is doing splendid work, 
the class gave several public ex- 
hibitions. The first one was held 
just previous to the Christmas vaca- 
tion. The sewing room was the 
scene of the exhibit and was 
decorated to correspond with the 
season. The department was visited 
by all the students as well as the 
professors of the College. There 
were also a number of visitors 
present from Elizabethtown. The 
last exhibit was held just before the 
close of the spring term. At this 
exhibition nearly all the garments 
made during the year were on ex- 
hibition. 



30 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



History of the Class of 1921 



Oh, never sit we down, and say 
There's nothing left but sorrow! 

We walk the wilderness today, 
The promised land tomorrow. 

And tho age wearies by the way, 
And hearts break in the furrow, 

We'll sow the golden grains today 
The harvest comes tomorrow. 

Build up heroic lives and all 
Be like a sheathen sabre, 

Ready to flash out at God's call, 
O chivalry of labor! 

Triumph and toil are twins; and a 
Joy suns the cloud of sorrow 

And 'tis the martyrdom of today 
Brings victory tomorrow. 

The illustrious class of 1921 has 
at last reached its long looked-for 
goal. But before we go, we want 
to give you an account of our many 
deeds and accomplishments since 
our beginning almost sixteen years 
ago. There have been successes and 
failures, joys and sorrows, all along 
our way these many years, but here 
we stand, staunch and true, stead- 
fast in purpose, a most worthy ex- 
ample for all classes in the future. 

In order to better understand the 
things that have helped to mold our 
character and the steady growth of 
our numbers, it is necessary to go 
back to that early day in Sept. 1905, 
It was on this day, when B. Mary 
Royer, our beloved classmate first 
made her appearance on College 
Hill, that our class had its origin. 



But she did not remain on the Hill 
very long, her heart was in India 
with the little brown boys and girls. 
She thus attained her purpose and 
after spending a number of years as 
a Foreign Missionary, she returned 
to the Hill in the Fall of 1920 to 
finish her Pedagogical course. To 
say the least, Mary has been the life 
and inspiration of our class and our 
debt to her is too great to ever re- 
pay. 

For a number of years no one was 
added to our number until in the 
Fall of 1912, with October's bright 
blue weather came our loyal class- 
mate Emma Ziegler. Everybody 
loves Emma; she has a place in her 
heart for all, for she is like a big sis- 
ter to us. 

1913 brought to us our renowned 
soloist, Ephraim Gibble Meyer. We 
are awakened in the morning and 
soothed to sleep at night by his 
melodious strains. Ephraim will 
make his mark in the near future, 
we feel sure. 

In the fall of 1914 who should 
appear on the Hill but Grant Wea- 
ver and with him Chester Royer. 
Grant was eagerly searching for 
wisdom and showed his good judg- 
ment in choosing the class of '21 in 
which to finish his course. Chester 
came here with the purpose of just 
getting enough knowledge to teach 
school, but he soon found out that 
the more he learned, the more there 
was to learn and the less he knew. 

1915 brought us no new members 
but we lost no time, for in the fall 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



31 



of 1916, a lad, by the name of 
Nathan Meyer, strolled into these 
halls of learning for the purpose of 
increasing his store of knowledge. 
Nathan has proved a faithful 
worker. His motto is to, "Do things 
the best you can or not at all." At 
the same time Verna Seiders ap- 
peared on the Hill. Verna is our 
nurse and a very accomplished one 
at that; that's why we're such a 
robust crowd. Now, however, her 
particular turn of mind is along the 
commercial line. 

The year 1917 opened with seven 
more added to our number. We 
are proud of these seven, for they 
were a great asset to our class. 
Laura Mover, a seemingly bashful 
little girl, made her appearance at 
this time. Laura just loves to tease, 
but, please, nobody tease her. At 
this time we also had a contribution 
from Lititz, Pennsylvania, in the 
personages of Lottie Janet Nies and 
Harriet M. Eberly. These lassies 
were just "fresh" from High 
School, but it wasn't long until 
"Pat's" winning ways won for her 
many friends, and as for "Laudanie" 
if we couldn't always see her, we 
never failed to hear her. Another 
most worthy contribution at this 
time we received in the person of 
Horace E. Raffensperger. "Raffie" 
hails from Adams County and it was 
not long until he had proved him- 
self a very capable student. The 
spring of 1917 found Anna Enter- 
line in our ranks. Anna is especial- 
ly gifted in music and has been de- 
veloping her talent along this line 
ever since. John Sherman who came 
here in 1917 was the next to enroll 
in our class. On the dav of our or- 



ganization he was elected President 
of our class. 

In the fall of 1918, who should 
join our ranks but Oliver Milton 
Zendt. Ollie was only a youth of 
fifteen, when he ventured to climb 
College Hill, but he has now suc- 
cessfully completed the College 
Preparatory Course. Our Presi- 
dent's son, Stanley Ober was also 
convinced that College Hill was the 
place for him and now we own him 
as a loyal member of the class of 
1921. This same year brought to us 
Mary Crouse. Mary hails from 
Myerstown and sometime we hope 
to hear from her as a foreign mis- 
sionary. 

But in all the years of our growth 
as a class, the year of 1919 stands 
out as having made the largest con- 
tribution in membership. This is 
the year in which Vera Hackman of 
Bareville decided to increase her 
store of knowledge and join herself 
to those of our number who had 
previously enrolled. "And still we 
gazed at her, and still our wonder 
grew, that one small head could 
carry all she knew." Jesse Oellig of 
Waynesboro is the live-wire of Al- 
pha Hall, but the queer thing about 
Judy, she is always so very, very, 
innocent (?) Next comes two more 
Lititzites, Laura Hershey and Eliza- 
beth Trimmer. Laura is one of the 
popular girls of the class. Although 
she was born and reared in beauti- 
ful Lancaster County, we are forced 
to believe that her preference is 
Montgomery or Philadelphia. We 
have in our number one of the Col- 
leges' future teachers. Rudolph 
Ziegler is the business man of our 
class. Here is Laura Frantz, our 



32 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



jolly commercial student. Laura 
started out in the 'Ted." Course, 
but something caused her to enter 
the commercial field instead. She, 
however, has not lost her liking for 
"Teds," one in particular. We also 
have in our midst three girls from 
town ; all three are interested in 
commercial work, and have decided 
to make office work their life (?) 
occupation. Those of whom I speak 
are Reba Ream, Kathryn Kaylor, 
Ruth Burkholder. Reba and Kath- 
ryn are always together and so it 
does not seem strange that they 
should be interested in the same 
line of wrok. Ruth is the smallest in 
our class, in stature only, for in 
"cutting up" she is a match for any- 
one. Here too is our quiet and 
backward classmate, Mabel Lichty. 
Mabel is very much interested in 
typewriting now, but who can tell 
how long it will continue. The Fall 
term of 1919 also found Minerva 
Reber wending her way toward Al- 
pha Hall. Reber is a loyal member 
of the Senior Class. She is big- 
hearted and will always greet you 
with a smile. 

On the 6th of Sept. 1920, we met 
to complete our final year. But we 
were not content to remain twenty- 
eight in number, we were destined 
to excel all other classes in quantity 
as well as quality. At the begin- 
ning of our last year, we welcomed 
into our midst Arthur S. Moyer, who 
hails from Lansdale, Montgomery 
County. "Art" is an all round fel- 
low and we are proud of him as a 
member of our class. There also 
appeared at this time our three very 
industrious little business women, 
Ruth Fogelsanger, from Shippens- 



burg, Sallie Groff from Brownstown 
and Blanch Hege from Waynes- 
boro. These lassies are somewhat 
quiet in their manner, but loyal as 
they can be to their class. Amy 
Gibble, whose home is in Dauphin 
County, also came to join the right 
class. Amy doesn't talk much, 
but when she does, it counts. Paul 
Markley also made his appearance 
at this time. Paul is a rather bash- 
ful lad, but never a slacker. An- 
other most worthy member of our 
class is Mary Wolgemuth, who hails 
from Elizabethtown. Mary is one 
of our bright and cheery girls. Ask 
Mary where to get the best ice 
cream and she'll always answer, 4 
"Oh, at Jack's." Lena Landis, an- 
other of our faithful day students, 
joined our ranks at this time. Lena 
possesses a sweet disposition and is 
loved by all who know her. 

During all these years of our 
growth, many of our number stop- 
ped at different posts along the " 
way to acquire some actual exper- 
ience, and thus on their return to 
our ranks, to enrich us as a class. 

The long looked-for year had now 
come. We were all eager to com- 
plete the race and reach our goal. 
But we saw, as all wide-awake 
classes will see, that we could not 
finish the race with our strength 
scattered. We saw the need of 
uniting our efforts to better accom- 
plish our task. With this in view, 
at 12 :35 on the 13th day of Septem- 
ber, our band met in Room E. Prof. 
Harley, our Faculty Advisor, acted 
as chairman of the meeting and the 
organization of our class was af- 
fected, resulting in John Sherman, 
President; Oliver Zendt, V. Presi- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



33 



dent; Laura Hershey, Secretary; 
Harriet Eberly, Treasurer. 

Our interests now having been 
directed along the same lines and 
our efforts united, we set out on our 
journey with renewed zeal and pur- 
pose. We did not, however, expect 
to find the road smooth and easy, 
for we now felt equal to anything 
that would befall us. Our oppor- 
tunities were many and opened up 
to us on every side, but our equal 
responsibility only tended to knit 
us together and renew our courage. 
With clasped hands, we struggled 
thru the new difficulties arising in 
Education, Science and business. 

We stopped several times along 
our journey, to take a rest from the 
cares of school life. The first, of 
these was the Faculty Reception, 
which we held on the 25th of Jan- 
uary. The evening of March 22nd 
found us enjoying our Senior Ban- 
quet in the dining room. We cele- 
, bra ted our Arbor Day exercises on 
the 8th of April, at which time we 
planted a Tulip Poplar tree in fond 
memory of old E. C. 

We have come at least to the end 
of our College career. The one 
bright ideal which has shone before 



us thru the ups and downs of the 
past sixteen years is a reality in- 
deed ; we are Seniors. We shrink 
from lauding our merits to the 
world. We will let others do that. 
We can but trust that our aims have 
been worthy, our efforts sincere and 
our conduct befitting the superiority 
of great minds. 

Our college life has meant much 
to us and we mean more in the fu- 
ture. We have come thru the fire 
tested and tried. We have survived 
the woes and struggles of Fresh- 
manhood, and the weighty wisdom 
of Sophomores. As Juniors, we car- 
ried ourselves proudly and did just 
obeisance to the Seniors. Now at 
last, we have reached the height of 
scholarly attainment and bear 
humbly the grave responsibilities 
placed upon us. 

We have mastered the prescribed 
curriculum, solved the mysteries of 
the mind, and are now educated. 
In view of our varied experience we 
feel it our duty to encourage those 
who are following in our footsteps. 
We advise them to be wise discreet, 
and self-confident, ever looking to 
us as the living embodiment of all 
they can hope to be. 



34 OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



• 5- • M/ ^r ^r- ^r 



Our college days are past; we face the world at last, 
Released from the grind of four full years, 

Fertile fields lie before; opportunity opens the door, 
We step across the threshold sans doubt or fear. 

Yet we hesitate as we separate 

From our classmates, faculty and friends. 

We wait in suspense, just a moment — tense, 
Frought with far-reaching destinies and ends. 

We stand today facing the way 

That leads on to the world's teeming road, 

But we fear no lot nor shun no spot, 
We will bear a man's share of the load. 

Our college days are past; they could not always last, 
Service ushers us on thru the wide open door, 

Yet we will bear in mind, all we leave behind, 
And for us the campus is — no more. 

E. V. T. 






OUR COLLEGE TIMES 35 



KNOWN AS 



Jno. Sherman Pet 

Laura Hershey Innocent 

Grant Weaver Arguer 

Emma Ziegler Good Manager 

Horace Raffensperger Biggest Bluffer 

Elizabeth Trimmer Raffie 

Chester Royer First Married 

B. Mary Royer Optimist 

Nathan Meyer Cartoonist 

Jessie Oellig Prof. Meyer's Girl 

Harriet Eberly Popular Girl 

Vera Hackman Most Brilliant 

Minerva Reber Sensitive 

Laura Moyer Fault Finder 

Lottie J. Nies Good Natured 

Arthur T. Moyer Loyal to School 

Stanley Ober Organizer 

Oliver M. Zendt Good Sport 

Ephraim Meyer Slow but sure 

Anna Enterline Kind girl 

Mary Crouse Heaviest girl 

Rudolph K. Ziegler Darkest eyes 

Laura Frantz Industrious 

Paul Markley Most bashful 

Ruth Fogelsanger Jolly girl 

Reba Ream Most quiet 

Sallie Groff Smiler 

Verna Seiders Curley 

Mary Wolgemuth Daniel 

Kathryn Kaylor Best Peiff er 

Ruth Burkholder Smallest girl 

Blanche Hege Next smallest girl 

Lena Landis Little student 

Mabel Lichty Having reddest hair 

Amy Gibble Little Blonde 



36 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




^oci'qI Prive leges 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



37 



THE SENIOR BANQUET 

The class of '21 decided that to 
be jolly and good natured one must 
be entertained and entertain, hav- 
ing entertained the faculty, the next 
thing to do was to entertain them- 
selves. On the eve of a certain day, 
the class met in room "F," amidst 
surroundings that made one think 
of a porch garden, so artistically 
were the things arranged in the 
room. The walls were obscured by 
the profuseness of the docorations, 
which consisted of pennants and 
crepe paper in the Senior colors. Af- 
ter indulging in an hour of games 
and sport the party adjourned to 

• the dining room where a repast was 
ready that would have done justice 
to a chef in any restaurant. Ban- 
quet was the password of the even- 
ing and the resemblance to a ban- 
quet could easily be seen. 

The social functions of any class 

I in any institution are vitally inter- 
esting. Featured always by the 
spirit of good-fellowship and good 
will, the Seniors held two socials in 
the past year. The first being the 
annual reception to the faculty and 
the second the Senior Banquet. 



The Senior Faculty Reception 

In the time that the seniors have 
had to come into contact with the 
faculty, we hoped that each had 
proven their worth. As a test of 
that theory, the annual reception to 
the faculty was planned. Com- 
mercial hall was dressed for the oc- 
casion, and invitations were sent to 
the members of the faculty, so that 
all might be present. 

Entering from the door at the top 



of the stairs, one did not recognize 
Commercial Hall. The hall for the 
first time looked inviting. All over 
the hall were the small tables so 
familiar, yet arranged in such un- 
familiar order. With white center- 
pieces and a bouquet of Sweet Peas 
on each table, things looked very 
cozy. The Senior colors were very 
much in evidence, pennants covered 
the boards, crepe paper arranged in 
the senior color schemes, were 
strung from all the pillars in the 
room, all this viewed under the 
shaded rays of several lights, was a 
picture worth remembering. 

The seating of the guests was ac- 
complished amid much merriment 
and song, the spirit of happiness 
reigned all evening. The meeting 
was in charge of the president, Mr. 
Sherman, who delivered* a short ad- 
dress of welcome, which was favor- 
ably received. Then the features of 
the evening were introduced. Mr. 
Nathan Meyer acted as a magician 
for a time, endeavoring to read the 
minds of the audience, he succeed- 
ed admirably well. Several mu- 
sicians were then introduced who 
entertained for a short time. Short 
speeches by members of the class 
representing the different branches 
studied were then in order, these 
proved interesting and showed 
some of the spirit that exists here. 
All was concluded by a light 
luncheon which, because of its ex- 
cellence, admirably closed the so- 
cial. During the luncheon an in- 
strumental trio played and kept up 
the cheery strains. Professor Meyer 
then responded, as a representative 
of the faculty, and the meeting was 
dismissed by the president. 



38 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Girls' Social 

An important event on the hill 
this spring was the organization of 
the young Women's Welfare As- 
sociation. This organization at its 
first meeting was entertained by the 
Senior girls. The social was held 
in Commercial Hall on the evening 
of February eighteen. The hall was 
beautifully and artistically decora- 
ted in the Senior colors, brown and 
buff. Tables decorated with bou- 
quets and lights shaded with the 
class colors transformed the ap- 
pearance of the hall from that of an 
unattractive classroom to that of a 
cosy inviting room. The girls, when 
they entered, involuntarily ex- 
claimed: My "I didn't know this old 
hall could look so pretty! Don't 
crepe paper and lights make a place 
look different!" The program of the 
evening was given by the Senior 
girls. Miss Enterline rendered a 
piano solo. B. Mary Royer gave a 
very helpful talk on "Girl's Ideals." 
Minerva Reber amused all with her 
humorous reaching in which she 
very effectively impersonated a lit- 
tle boy. Misses Enterline and Nolt 
played a piano duet. After the pro- 
gram there was a social hour in 
charge of the Senior girls during 
which refreshmnts were served. 
The amusing games and contests 
helped to make the meeting a suc- 
cess. The girls went to their rooms 
leaving a few happy girls to put 
things in order again. 



ARBOR DAY 

April the 8th marked one of the 
most important days that the 



Seniors had thus far experienced. 
After some preparation, the Arbor 
Day event arrived. Some of the 
features on the program were an 
Instrumental Trio by Misses Eberly, 
Hershey and Nies; an essay entitled 
Arbor Day by, Elizabeth V. Trim- 
mer. The essay contained beauti- 
ful thoughts and was well given. 
Mary Wolgemuth gave a Piano- 
logue entitled Apple Blossoms. The 
address of the afternoon was given 
by Dr. A. W. Dupler of Juniata 
College. He emphasized very 
strongly the appreciation one 
should have for the beauty of trees. 
He seemed to think that just then 
was the time when they were the f 
most beautiful, with their delicate 
shades of green. He spoke of the 
lessons we should take from the 
trees, comparing their growth to 
the development of our characters. 

Following this was a dialogue en- 
titled — The Joys of Country Life. 41 
The characters were : Mr. Nathan 
Green, Arthur Moyer; Mrs. Nathan 
Green, Jessie Oellig; Molly, Min- 
erva Reber, Jennie, Lottie Nies; 
Hattie, Laura Moyer, their daugh- 
ters; Tom, a young son, Horace 
Raffensperger ; Squire Tibbs, a 
prominent citizen, Rudolph Zieg- 
ler; Prof. Hans Hinkledorfer, a 
musician, Oliver Zendt; Prof. 
Henry Thoreau Beetleman, a na- 
turalist, Nathan Meyer; Monsieur 
Francois Le Boeuf, an artist, Stan- 
ley Ober; Miss Mae Everett Fletch- 
er, an authoress, Laura Hershey; 
Miss L. Mabelle Young, an actress, 
Harriet Eberly; Mrs. Eliza Jane 
Bumpus, a newsmonger, Vera 
Hackman. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



39 



The play was divided into two 
acts. The scene of the first one was 
a side porch at the Green home- 
stead. Mrs. Green and her daugh- 
ters were busy at their morning 
chores when they were interrupted 
a number of times by the city 
boarders who had come to the coun- 
try for the summer. 

Country Life was a new experi- 
ence to these visitors and they 
created much excitement through 
their ignorance. For example, they 
could not tell which cows gave 
sweet milk or which gave butter 
milk and they had never seen eggs 
actually growing on egg plants. The 
experiences with the bees and geese 
also aroused much excitement. 

The scene of the second act was 
a lawn at the home of Squire Tibbs 
where a tree planting social was 
held. The main speakers at the 
program were the visitors from the 
city. Prof. Henkledorfer rendered 
a violin solo, Miss Young, a vocal 
solo, and Miss Fletcher read an ex- 
tract from the book she was writ- 
ing during her stay in the country, 
entitled "The Joys of Country 
Life." The last feature at the social 
was the Arbor day song. Then the 
seniors marched out with the rest to 
a spot west of Alpha Hall where 
they planted their tree, a tulip 
poplar. Surrounded by friends, we, 
one by one placed about the tree 
our shovelful of soil until it had 
been firmly implanted in its new 
home. 



ARBOR DAY 

"He who plants a tree 
Plants a hope." 

— Lucy Larcom. 

Arbor Day or Tree Day is now 
observed in every state in our Union 
and mainly in our schools. This 
happy idea of designating a given 
clay when all should be invited to 
plant trees, belongs solely to Ex.- 
Governor Morton, of Nebraska. In 
this month of April, we give a part 
of a day to special exercises and to 
actual tree planting, in recognition 
of the importance of trees to us as 
a Nation and of what they yield in 
adornment, comfort, and useful 
products to the communities in 
which we live. It is becoming the 
most interesting, widely observed 
and useful of school holidays. 

James Russell Lowell said, "I re- 
spect a man in exact proportion to 
his respect for trees." The day has 
been called one of the loveliest 
practices of the country and cen- 
tury, when we see how the per- 
ennial lessons of horticulture have 
transformed the barren, summits 
into picturesque groups of trees, 
pockets of wild flowers, trails of 
running vines and spots of most 
brilliant color. 

It is well that we should celebrate 
our Arbor Day thoughtfully, for 
within our lifetime, the Nation's 
need of trees will become serious. 
We of this generation can perhaps 
get along with what we have, 
though with growing hardship, but 
in the full manhood and woman- 
hood of the coming generations, 
they will want what nature once so 
bountifully supplied, and man so 



40 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



thoughtlessly destroyed ; and be- 
cause of that want they will re- 
proach us, not for what we have 
used, but, for what we have wasted. 

For the nation, as for the man or 
woman, boy or girl, the road to 
success is the right use of what we 
have "and the improvement of 
present opportunity. If we neglect 
to prepare ourselves now for the 
duties and responsibilities which 
will fall upon us later, if we do not 
learn the things which we will need 
to know when our school days are 
over, we will suffer the conse- 
quences. So any nation which in its 
youth lives only for the day, reaps 
without sowing, and consumes with- 
out husbanding, must expect the 
penalty of the prodical, whose labor 
could with difficulty find him the 
bare means of life. 

A nation without children would 
face a hopeless future ; a country 
without trees is almost as hopeless; 
forests which are so used that they 
cannot renew themselves will soon 
vanish and with them all their bene- 
fits. A true forest is not merely a 
storehouse full of wood, but, as it 
were, a factory of wood, and at the 
same time a reservoir of water. 
When you help to preserve our 
forests or plant new ones you are 
acting the part of good citizens. The 
value of forestry deserves, there- 
fore, to be taught in our schools, 
which aim to make good citizens. 

Pennsylvania was originally one 
of the best timbered states in the 
East. The original forests covered 
^-'almost every acre of soil and yield- 
ed large quantities of the best 
lumber in America. 



But conditions have changed. 
Where once stood miles of unsur- 
passed white pine, hemlock and 
white oak, there now remain vast 
areas producing little or nothing of 
value. The glorious forests of the 
Keystone State are gone. They can 
be renewed by giving proper care 
to the lands upon which they grew. 

We need more and better forests. 
Nature cannot do the work alone. 
Man must help in this important 
business. The first and most es- 
sential thing is to stop forest fires. 
They are unnecessary and destruc- 
tive. 

Forest fires have already made a 
desert one sixth of Pennsylvania. a 
They must be stopped and the boys ™ 
and girls in our public schools can 
undertake no more worthy task 
than to help protect our fast vanish- 
ing and poorly cared for forests. 

The teachers of America have in 
their keeping a tremendous educa- 
tional force which they can exert f 
in behalf of forests. They can and 
must teach children the great 
economic value of the forest, the 
place that it holds in our national 
economy and the necessity for con- 
serving it in order that future gen- 
erations may have wood and all the 
other products that the forest af- 
fords. They must teach the chil- 
dren the great recreational and 
esthetic value of trees and how re- 
spect and love for them with their 
great overarching crowns and long, 
straight stems make for a better 
and more wholesome life. 

One of the most pleasing features 
of European countries is the excel- 
lent system of roads bordered by 
miles and miles of trees. With pro- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



41 



per stimulation of interest in tree- 
planting and tree culture we might 
easily rival the great roadways of 
Europe as far as beauty is con- 
cerned. The study of tree growth 
and structure in the schools cannot 
fail to awaken an intelligent inter- 
est in these monarchs of the forest. 
Any and all means that awaken a 
desire to save our forests and beau- 
tify our country, should be earnestly 
commended and encouraged. The 
people have too long looked at trees 
thru eyes trained to see "lumber" 
and that only. 

When we desert our close and 
crowded houses for the open and 
£ spacious wood, we see what ma- 
jestic beauties daily wrap us in its 
bosom. The tempered light of the 
woods is like a perpetual morning 
which is stimulating and heroic. 
The anciently reported spells of 
these places creep upon us. The 
stems of pines, hemlocks and oaks 
gleam like iron on the excited eye. 
The communicable trees begin to 
persuade us to live with them and 
quit our life of solemn trifles. 

In the woods, too, a man casts off 
his years, as the snake his slough, 
and in whatsoever period of life, is 
always a child. In the woods is per- 
petual youth. Within these planta- 
tions of God, a sanctity reigns, a 
perpetual festival is dressed, and 
the guest sees not how he should 
tire of them in a thousand years. In 
the woods we return to reason and 
faith. There we feel that nothing 
can befall us in life which Nature 
cannot repair. 

If our Arbor Day exercises help 
us to realize what benefits each of 
us receives from the forests and 



how by our assistance these bene- 
fits may continue, they will serve a 
good end. Pupils, parents, teachers, 
everybody must be inspired with 
the life of beauty and a desire for 
home and landscape adornment. 

God hath a presence that we may 
see in every fold of the flower and 
every leaf of the tree. The daisies, 
the brooks, the trees to us are only 
nature, until Christ has so revealed 
God to us that we see our Father 
in them. The aspect of Nature is 
devout. Like the figure of Jesus, 
she stands with bended head and 
hands folded upon her breast. The 
happiest man is he who learns from 
Nature the lesson of worship. 

Father, thy hand hath reared 
these venerable columns, thou didst 
weave this verdent roof. Thou 
didst look down upon" the naked 
earth, and forthwith, rose all these 
fair ranks of trees. They, in the 
sun budded and shook their green 
leaves in the breeze, and shot to- 
ward heaven. The century-living 
crow, whose birth was in their tops, 
grew old and died among their 
branches, till at last they stood, 
as now they stand, massy and tall 
and dark, fit shrine for humble wor- 
shipper to hold communion with his 
maker. These dim vaults, these 
winding aisles of human pomp, or 
pride, report not. No fantastic 
carvings show the boast of their 
vain race to change the form of thy 
fair works. But thou art here — thou 
fillest the solitude. Thou art in the 
soft winds, that run along the sum- 
mit of these trees in music ; thou art 
in the cooler breath that from the 
inmost darkness of the place comes, 
scarcely felt; the barky trunks, the 



42 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ground, the frost moist ground, are 
all instinct with thee. Here is con- 
tinual worship ; nature, here, in the 
tranquility that thou dost love, en- 
joys thy presence. Noiselessly 
around, from perch to perch, the 
solitary bird passes; and yon clear 
spring, that midst its herbs, wells 
softly forth and wandering steeps 
the roots of half the mighty forest, 
tells no tale of all the good it does. 
Thou hast not left thyself without a 
witness, in those shades, of thy per- 
fections. Grandeur, strength and 
grace, are here to speak of thee. 
This mighty oak by whose immov- 
able stem, I stand and seem almost 



annihilated — not a prince, in all 
that proud old world beyond the 
deep, e'er wore his crown as loftily 
as he wears the green colored 
coronal of leaves with which thy 
hand has graced him. Nestled at 
his root, is beauty, such as blooms 
not in the glare of the broad sun. 
That delicate forest flower with 
scented breath and look so like a 
smile, seems as it issues from the 
shapeless mould an emanation of 
the indwelling life, a visible token 
of the upholding love, that are the 
soul of this wide universe. 



BADLY IN NEED OF 



Ruth Burkholder A Stretcher 

Mary Wolgemuth Ears 

Verna Seiders A Curler 

Laura Frantz A Prophet (Nathan) 

Jno. Sherman Pep 

Laura Hershey Mouse Trap 

Emma Ziegler More 

Horace Raffensperger A Queen Elizabeth 

Arthur T. Moyer "Ditto" 

Stanley Ober An Olive 

Nathan Meyer Secretary 

Vera Hackman A New Gait 

Lottie J. Nies Nerve Tonic 

Elizabeth Trimmer A Good Time 

Minerva Reber A Daniel 

B. Mary Royer India 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



43 






c 

CO 

o 



GO 

o 



















0> 
























£ 
























0) 


















- 






A 


















01 






+j 


















a 




















Fh 




0) 






s 








Sh 






0> 




4) 


Fh 


u 


■l-H 




^ 


Fh 


(V 






-3 




rM 


v 


o> 


s 




oj 


0) 


,3 

ft 


u 

c 
o 




03 




o 


ft 


ft 


>. 




-3 

ft 


03 








o 


03 


03 


O 




03 


03 


Fh 

be 


e— 


H 


bo 

5 


pq 


So 


F-i 
bo 


X 


3 
o 






o 






co 
H 
3 
55 


-a 

0) 


o 


o 


a) 


O 


o 


c 

o> 
CO 


co 
m 

i 


'-J3 


to 

3 


s 

0) 

CO 


c 
ai 
+-> 

CO 


£ 

J 


to 

i 


OJ 


s 

01 
-t-> 

co 



^ 




£ 








c 




o 


Sh 


■p 


O 


c p 


SO 






a 


> 


•sJ= 


u 


u bo 




o s 


ft 


^m 


3 

co 



0) -Q 

3 — 



Hco 













CO 


















Sh 


















o> 


















^ 


ft 






co 




co 








03 






eg 


in 

OJ 

o 


3 
g 


3 


OJ 


03 
U 
O 






s 


3 

OJ 
F-i 


&J0 

3 


03 
-3 

4-1 


-1-3 

03 

Fh 


-3 


03 




e^- 


-3 


o> 


+J 


Fh 


o 


is 




01 


co | 


n3 


«H 




o 


o 


03 


u 


>> ! 


0) 


£ 


-3 
CO 


Q 


4J 

CO 


Ph 


i 


* i 



pq 



■3 


"Si 


3 




03 


o 


O 


H 



£ 





0) 




s 




o 


bo 


-3 


n 






bo 


j-i 


3 


3 


o 


fc 


O 



X 



ft 



3 



u 



Ph 



a 



M 



ft 



S3 
H 

W 

«! 



>* 


55 


w 


ffi 


o 


CO 


H 


« 


M 


W 


W 


u 




W 


«i 


W 




,T| 


w 


<r? 




u 


« 


«< 


55 


P 


« 


«I 


<! 


w 


j 


►J 


> 


PQ 



Ph 













DO 
































CO 




















i 












0> 
3 




bi 








^ 






-Q 






>a 












3 








03 






O 






-i-j 








_> 


S 


'p 




>> 








i-s 


^ 




03 








-P 


to 


o3 


o> 


+j 




CO 


42 




3 


§ 

-3 
3 
3 

O ! 


>> 
c 


C 
03 

3 
CO 


o 
3 


>> 

4J 

in 

3 

C 
h- 1 


>> 


O 

i 

CO 


c 

03 

to 
03 
0> 

E 


0> 

Q 
>•. 

03 
P 


o 

3 
OJ 

o 

o 

3 
3 
I— i 


03 


CO 
OJ 

3 

'3 
<y 


^2 

9 

PQ 


o 
o 

-3 
O 
O 

O 


'o 

1-5 


co 

03 

<i 



Ph 



^ 


P4 




H 


>H 


5h 


K 


H 


H 


o 

1— 1 


s 


5^ 


1-1 


z 


§ 


hJ 


< 


<1 


w 


w 


« 


^ 


H 


m 


<! 


<J 


PL, 


S 


55 


w i 



44 










OUR COLLEGE TIMES 


















M 
U 

"5 

4) 

Q 


Sh 

o 

-H> 
o 
o 

Q 


hi 

P. 
» 



o 
o 
PQ 




,C 



H 


u 



rC 

03 



H 


Sh 




OS 



u 

PU 


"3 

.2* 
'0 
_g 
'C 

Ph 

"o 



CO 

-§> 


h. 



u 




s 

O 

O 
O 


CO 
>> 

03 

la 

03 




6 


3 
"0 

03 

w 

«H 

P 

Ih 
O 

CO 

03 
PL, 


1 © 

!b 



«H 

O 

O 

CJ 



+3 

50 
03 
Pm 


u 


ft 
o3 
u 
bo 

C 

+j 
CQ 


a 


c 


I? 

1 «3 

'cO 
CO 


'0 

c 

03 


U 


> 


2 


03 

-H> 

'3 


i — i 

*V 

0) 

3 

c 

•PN 

c 
o 
u 


M 

5 


3 
U 

u 

S3 

o 
co 


e— 



a 

o 

o 

bo 

o 
Eh 


C 
PS 




a 



PQ 


CO 

ft 

a 


bo 

c 

*S 

u 



ft 

O 


bo 
O 

pq 


W 





2 


T3 

CO 
93 
O 

bo 

.5 
'53 
PQ 




'43 



CJ 



' O 

"> 
T3 




'-J3 
ft 
3 
u 
u 


c 


CO 


bO 

.S 

'ft 







pq 


CO 

e 

p 

! bO 

PS 


CO 


bo 

g 




+3 


a 

J3 
"hi 


Who and Why [ 


M 

4) 


bO 

s 


>» 
CO 


CO 

"3 


CO 

Eh 


CO 



a 

"-J3 

T3 

o 
o 
O 


CO 



_> 

o 



+-> 

co 

ft 

'S 

H 


& 



< 


'-3 



3 


c 

'•JJ 





bO 

c 
ft 

a^ 

S 03 




CO 

a 


ft 




co 

O 
O 
O 




•rH 

c 

03 

Q 

in 
O 

M 



pq 


CO 

ft 

ft 

'o 


bO 

a 

'S 


Fh 


ft 
03 

x: 
O 


X 



CO 

HI 

'3 

fa 


HI 



a 


a 

>. 
+3 


03 
fa 


H 





-a 

PQ 


.2? 

'53 

W 


6X1 
S 

'2, 

oJ 



a 
co 


A 


cO 


>» 

u 
o 

HI 
O 


CO 

1 









> 


S3 


Xtl 

a 



bo 

a 

"o3 

Eh 




d 



"53 
Q 


a 

a 

CO 


CO 



>> 




PQ 


bO 

a 
"3 

bO 




co 

bo 



_ft 

CO 

£4 



T3 
03 



HI 
O 

'3 


CO 

T3 


s 

"c 
bo 

S 




CO 

03 

-H> 

r P 
O 
O 

O 


(A 

o 





o 
Q 




"0 
"3 

03 
C3 


17 


"ft 

g 

1 

co 




OS 

PS 


+3 







?2 

> 


2 


1 " ti 

03 

a 

s 



! 5° 



pq 




> 

03 





[0 

p 


"0 

M 
>> 

a 
a 


"hi 



'bO 
_0 

N 


'0 
CO 


^ 


< 

2 


PS 

fa 

O 

PS 
P 

w 

Eh 

PS 


w 

M 

PS 

P 

Pm 


CO 

w 

H- 1 

H 

t— i 

H 
H 
O 


a 

fa 
o 

S 

CO 

co 
W 
►-a 


PS 
fa 
PQ 
O 

>H 

fa 

«! 

Eh 
CO 


PS 

fa 
O 

ps 
w 

Pm 
CO 

fa 

fa ' 
fa 

« 

O 
< 
PS 
O 
M 


PS 
w 

>H 

O 

P4 

Pi 
w 

Eh 
CO 
W 


p< 
w 



« 

PS 

PQ 


P4 

W i 
PQ 
W 
P4 

> 

PS 
W 

i— 1 


w 
PS 

<J 

PQ 
W 

PS 


2 

<! 

a 

CO 




PS 

H 

t— 1 
PS 
H 

a 

H 
H 
pq 
<! 

N 
►— i 


PS 

> 
< 

Eh 

PS I 

I 


W 

H 

H 
O 

O 

PS 
<l 


H 
Q 

H 
N 

PS 
> 

O 


OS 

w 
w 

HH 

N 


PS 
W 

HH 
O 

w 

N 

W 
Oh 

H^ 
O 

Q 
P 
PS 


CO 

PS 

m 

Q 

w 

CO 

<«J 

PS 
fa 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



45 






$ 



ft 



c 



\ ^§ 






ji'4 


— \ / /^ 


<X V - _ >\. / ^^~ 


— <r~^~- 


-s 



^h r^3H5SlrWV---= 



46 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ATHLETICS 



Athletics or Athleticism is the ex- 
hibition of men's physical progress 
in games of skill and endurance for 
pastime and for the development of 
bodily strength. This term is de- 
rived from the Greek. The Greeks 
were the best of all athletes. The 
Romans and Norseman also de- 
veloped very much physically. The 
spirits of the Greek, the Roman, 
and the Norseman planted their 
seeds in the hardy Anglo-Saxons, 
who in turn transplanted them into 
the men of Virginia and New Eng- 
land soils on the northern continent 
of America, where its influence has 
been felt, even since the entire dis- 
appearance of the supremacy of the 
Latin race. It is not surprising, 
therefore, that, with the disappear- 
ance of the earlier modes of life of 
the first settlers, calling for all the 
physical strain that the human 
frame was capable of, and the re- 
turn of the comparative leisure 
which in early youth now surrounds 
the American universities and col- 
leges, there has reappeared a 
yearning for opportunities to sup- 
ply, artificially, if so it must be, the 
stress and contest, physical effort, 
and the proof of supremacy of the 
earlier ages, when such conditions 
were compulsory. The Greek ath- 
letes were obliged to submit to a 
rigorous discipline, including care- 
ful avoidance of excesses, a special 
diet, regular exercise, and the cul- 
tivation of courage, self-control, 
and resourcefulness. In most col- 
leges today athletes must comply 
with strict regulations. 



Athletics relieves the mind of the 
duties of class work. In this year 
athletics have reached their high- 
est point in the history of Elizabeth- 
town College. Several new games 
were introduced. This was largely 
due to the efforts of the Young 
Men's Welfare Association, Young 
Women's Welfare Association and 
also to the untiring efforts of Pro- 
fessor I. S. Hoffer, who is the Di- 
rector of Athletics. An Athletic 
Association was organized recently 
and more interest is taken in Ath- 
letics by both the boys and girls. 
The Athletics on College Hill are: 
Base Ball, Basket Ball, Soccer, Ten- 
nis, Skating, Walking and Cross 
Country Running. The Athletics 
that are being introduced are 
Track, High and Broad Jump and 
Pole-vaulting. 

In the fall of the year a little 
base ball was played but the 
weather soon became too cold and 
soccer season followed. This is a 
great game for the development of 
the body as a whole. Every boy was 
supposed to take part. In this game 
science and skill must be used. 
Many interesting and close games 
were played. There were two teams 
organized consisting of eleven men 
each. These teams were captained 
by Oliver Zendt and Daniel Myers. 

After the snow began to fall and 
the more severe cold days ap- 
proached, Basket Ball took its place 
on the Hill. Basket Ball is a game 
loved by many. Many close games 
were played among the students 
and toward the close of the season 
the Seniors organized a powerful 
team which played a great brand 
of basket ball. The twelve Senior 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



47 



boys picked five men for their team. 
The Juniors picked five from a 
much larger number. These two 
teams met in three hot contests. 

The Seniors captured the first 
game by the score of 16-14. This 
was one of the best and closest 
game ever witnessed on the Hill. 
The Players were on their toes from 
the start of the game to the final 
whistle when the strong Senior Five 
came out victorious. The Senior 
team was well supported by the 
faithful group of Senior Girls who 
yelled and cheered throughout the 
game. Three of the Senior stars 
were on the regular College line- 
up. 

Following is the line-up of the 
Senior Big Five : 

O. Zendt Forward 

S. Ober Forward 

A. Moyer Center 

H. Raffensperger Guard 

G. Weaver Guard 

f J. Sherman Guard 

We must not forget our Senior 
Girls' Big Five. They defeated the 
Juniors in every game they played. 
One of the games the score resulted 
14-6 in favor of the Senior tossers. 
The credit was largely due to their 
Star forward Miss Hershey, who 
put every foul through the net, be- 
sides contributing field goals. In 
another game the score stood 3-0 in 
favor of the Seniors. This victory 
was due to the whole team. Her- 
shey at forward contributed the 
points. Eberly and Reber starred at 
passing the ball, and our strong 
star guards, Trimmer and Nies, held 
the Juniors scoreless. Great credit 
should be given them The Senior 
Boys were loyal to the girls backing 



them with their many yells and 
cheers, and urging them to go in 
and win. The Junior boys were 
somewhat idle. 

This is the line-up of the Senior 
Girls' Unconquered Five. 
Misses 

L. Hershey Forward 

H. Eberly Forward 

M. Reber Center 

E. Trimmer Guard 

L. Nies Guard 

As the Basket Ball season came 
to a close we turned to America's 
National Game, Base Ball. This is 
the most loved of all games and the 
Seniors knew this. Base Ball is an- 
other game of science and skill. 
Brain work is the chief element 
used in this game. We the Seniors 
have but twelve men in our class 
but out of this number we picked 
nine men for our Base Ball team. 
Several of our players had not 
played Base Ball for several years 
but still we beat the Juniors by the 
score of 11-2. The largest crowd of 
the season attended this game and 
saw the Juniors go down to defeat 
at the strong hands of the Seniors. 
This victory however was partly 
due to the cheering of our loyal 
Senior girls who urged us on to 
victory with their many yells and 
cheers. The Seniors hit the offer- 
ings of the Junior star twirlers hard. 
They knocked the first pitcher D. 
Myers out of the box and he was re- 
placed by Edris who was supposed 
to check the powerful slugging of 
the Seniors but it was all in vain. 

The Juniors not being satisfied 
because they were defeated we 
played them a second game which 



48 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



again resulted in the defeat of the 
Juniors by the score of 7-5. 

Following is the line-up of the 
teams: 

"Seniors" "Juniors" 

H. Raffensperger. .c. .E. Eshleman 

O. Zendt p D. Myers 

A. Moyer 1st... .P. Brandt 

S. Ober 2nd L. Wolgemuth 

G. Weaver. . . .3rd W. Longenecker 

N. Meyer ss A. Meyer 

J. Sherman If E. Edris 

E. Meyer cf . .C. Holsopple 

R. Ziegler rf . . . .J. Reber 

The series of five games finally 
resulted in the complete defeat of 
the Junior team. 

While Base Ball is being played 
Tennis is also in its prime. The 
Seniors both boys and girls have 
the best material for tennis on the 
Hill. The Seniors are eager to play 
the Juniors and have sent them a 
challenge but as yet we have had no 
reply. Zendt, Moyer, Weaver and 
Misses Hershey, Eberly and Nies 
are the Seniors' tennis stars. 



School of Finance and Commerce 

This is the first year that definite- 
ly arranged courses have been out- 
lined for College entrance in busi- 
ness courses (complete commercial 



course) a strong course in Junior 
College work for teachers (Teach- 
ers' Commercial Course), a regular 
college course in business leading to 
the degree of Bachelor of Science 
(B. S.) 

The College Commercial Course 
is so outlined as to permit students 
to continue graduate work in the 
University for the Master's and 
Doctor's degrees. 

As a result of these definitely ar- 
ranged courses, we have students 
enrolled in the Freshman, Junior, 
and Senior years of the Complete 
Commercial Course, others in the 
Freshman year of the College Com- 
mercial Course. 

These courses are a great in- 
centive for students to continue 
their preparation and quality suf- 
ficiently for the highest attainments 
in business efficiency. 

The studies in the Shorter 
Courses (Bookkeeping and Short- 
hand) were continued same as pre- 
ceding years with excellent results. 

Judging from the first year's 
work in these courses, and the num- 
ber of inquiries received from pros- 
pective students, we see a bright fu- 
ture under the supervision of a 
strong and efficient corps of teach- 
ers. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



49 



Prophecy of the Class of 1921 



Mr. Ober is sitting in a train 
reading the book, "Christianity and 
the Nations" when Miss Hackman 
enters and sits on the same seat 
with Mr. Ober. 

Ober — Good morning. 

Hackman — Good morning (be- 
gins reading also, becomes tired 
and lays books aside). 

Ober — Pardon me, Have you 
ever read Christianity and the Na- 
tions. 

Hackman — Yes, I read that quite 
a number of years ago in Mission 
Study Course at College. Its mes- 
sage was a challenge to me. 

Ober — Thus far I have found it 
applicable to present day problems. 
I noticed you were reading in a 
foreign language and I presume you 
are a foreign missionary. 

Hackman — Yes, I am just home 
on my first furlough from central 
Africa. 

Ober — Then I expect you are on 
a lecture tour among the various 
universities of the States. 

Hackman — Yes, I'm on my way 
to Des Moines University. I'm quite 
eager to lecture there and give a 
heart to heart message to the peo- 
ple of my own faith. Among the 
other universities my lectures had 
to be rather general, you see. 

Ober — Let me see, a missionary 
in Africa sent over under the Breth- 
ren Church Board. I don't believe 
you told me your name. 

Hackman — Miss Hackman is my 
name. 

Ober — That name sounds fa- 
miliar. I'm S. H. Ober, University 
Pastor at Des Moines. My, this is 



rather unique that we two having 
the same destination should have 
the pleasure of riding together. But 
let me see Hackman, you say, (To 
himself) where did I meet a girl by 
that name before) . 

Hackman — Oh, I remember you 
are that fellow we used to call 
"Shrimp" at E. C. 

Ober — And your the girl us used 
to call sister "Wera." 

Hackman — Tell me what you 
havp been doing since you left E. C. 

Ober — I finished my College 
work at Bethany, then after some 
extensive travel in Europe I re- 
ceived my D. D. at Aberdeen Scot- 
land. Upon my return to the States 
I was offered the Chair of Theology 
at Des Moines in our University. 
Feeling that this was a great op- 
portunity for strengthening the con- 
ception of pure theology I accepted 
and find my work intensely inter- 
esting. And in what part of 
Africa are you located. 

Hackman — I have been quite se- 
cluded, in the interior of the Dark 
Continent. I'm cut off from the mis- 
sion by a distance of seven hundred 
miles. My present duty is a mixture 
of evangelistic, educational and 
medical work. My experiences as 
the only white woman and only mis- 
sionary within a radius of hundreds 
of miles has been very fascinating. 

Ober — I should think so. By the 
way I guess you know that Nathan 
Meyer one of the class-mates is one 
of our most prominent science 
teachers at Des Moines. 

Hackman — I don't believe I know 
him. 



50 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Ober — Oh yes you remember him 
he was one of the Pedagogical 
Seniors in 1921. 

Hackman — That's right I re- 
member now, and what has become 
of the rest of our class, with the 
exception of a few, I know nothing 
of their whereabouts. 

Ober — Well I happen to know 
where quite a few of them are be- 
cause they were at our class re- 
union last year. You know the 
Alumni Program was given by the 
class of 1921. Do you remember 
that romantic couple with whom the 
social restriction sometimes con- 
flicted ? 

Hackman — Oh, you mean Beth 
and Raff, of course they are mar- 
ried by this time. Where are they? 

Ober — Well Elizabeth taught 
school a few years while Horace 
finished his work at Franklin and 
Marshall College. And now Prof. 
Raffensperger is principal of the 
Lititz schools. During the summer 
months he is assistant business 
manager of the chain of Trimmer's 
stores. And Beth's chum Laura 
Hershey is a missionary in China, 
the wife of a prominent College pro- 
fessor. 

Hackman — That's right, didn't 
we have three Lauras in our class. 
Laura Frantz and Laura Moyer 
were the other two. 

Ober — Laura Moyer is a primary 
teacher in Philadelphia. She has 
quite a responsible position and is 
making good. And Laura Frantz 
you will meet at the university. She 
is Dr. Meyer's pal and private sec- 
retary. 

Hackman — And Emma Ziegler is 
a missionary in India. 



Ober — And the latest reports tell 
of the wonderful work she is doing 
in her station. In a letter from one 
of my friends over there, I learned 
that she and one of the prominent 
ministers were mutually interested 
in each other and that perhaps is his 
next letter he could tell me more 
definiely of the outcome. 

Hackman — What has become of 
Judy? 

Ober — She has built up for 
Waynesboro High School an Eng- 
lish department of enviable repute. 
And is now assistant principal at 
that place. Then you surely remem- 
ber Pats, well she has won great 
distinction thru her masterpiece of 
art "The Conflict," which is a por- 
trayal of a fierce struggle between 
a victorious "Wolfe" and a defeat- 
ed "Bear." And her chum J. Lottie, 
with her wonderful contralto voice 
moves the souls of those who are 
already stirred by the striking ap- 
peals of the renowned evangelist, 
our classmate Ollie. 

Hackman — You remember Sallie 
Groff was one of my old friends. 
Well she is teaching at her Alma 
Mater, West Earl High School. She 
says Amy Gibble her classmate is 
doing efficient civil service work at 
Harrisburg. 

Ober — Yes, the Commercial mem- 
bers of our class are all reflecting 
the spirit of E. C. remarkably well. 
Verna Seiders and Mary Wolge- 
muth hold the most responsible po- 
sitions in the offices of the Kreider 
Shoe Co. And Rudolph Ziegler the 
efficient business manager of our 
class is an instructor at the Walton 
School of Commerce. And Ruth 
Burkholder heads the office force at 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



51 



Muth Brothers Wheat Mills in her 
Home town. 

Hackman — Yesterday B. Mary 
Royer our class-mate who is home 
on her third furlough from India 
went with me to the Brethren in 
Christ Publishing House for some 
mission pamphlets. In the office we 
met Mabel Lichty one of our class- 
mates. 

Ober — Ruth Fogelsanger is a 
nurse in the Shippensburg Hospital. 
And her chum Blanche Hege is the 
Hospital Stenographer. And Paul 
Markley is taking care of the busi- 
ness end of his father's large meat 
packing establishment in Lebanon. 

Hackman — And Mary Crouse 
will be home on her first furlough 
next year. She is the head nurse 
in one of the new hospitals in China. 

Ober — Yes, a very interesting let- 
ter from her was read at our class 
reunion. And she seems to be es- 
pecially well adapted to her work. 
Another letter was also read. This 
one was from Doc. He is doing ex- 
tensive evangelistic work along the 
Pacific Coast. His energetic appeals 
and his wielding influence are work- 
ing wonders among the western 
churches. 

Hackman — Where is Billy Sher- 
man? 

Ober — Oh, that's right, Billy was 
our class president. He graduated 
from an Eastern University and 
then accepted the pastorate of the 
Hatfield congregation. I think there 
are three more of our classmates in 
that vicinity. In one of the aristo- 
cratic suburbs of Philadelphia Kath- 
ryn Kaylor, Reba Ream and Lena 
Landis have the best versed office 
of information concerning legal 



procedures for miles around. 

Hackman — I have not heard the 
least bit of information about Min- 
erva Reber. 

Ober— Well after she finished 
her College work at Manchester 
and having a year or two at 
Bethany she was married and is 
now working in the sunny regions 
of Virginia. 

Hackman — Whatever became of 
our baritone singer & class composer 

Ober — He too was married, and 
is now famous. Ephraim junior is 
already following the footsteps of 
his father. After traveling thru the 
various conservatories of Europe 
Mr. Meyer has returned and is now 
giving recitals thruout the states ac- 
companied by our pianist Miss En- 
terline. Next week they appear on 
our lecture course and a month la- 
ter the famous orator the Honor- 
able Weaver gives his famous lec- 
ture on the "Hypothetical Psy- 
chology of Pedagogics." 

Hackman — And say we had the 
dearest little baby in our class. Do 
you remember Thelma Allegra? 

Ober — She certainly was the 
second Chester in being humorous. 
Well Chester and his family moved 
to Bethany where he continued his 
College work taking his major in 
Bible. And now in conjunction 
with his work in the various mis- 
sion poinis of the city, he is one of 
the influential members of 
Bethany's faculty. 

Hackman — What town is this. 

Ober — This is Des Moines. You 
will be at our house for dinner and 
then we shall have plenty of time 
to discuss in detail the fond mem- 
ories of dear old E. C. 



52 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 







4* 




OJO 


o 




s 


o 
















•p 


o> 




s 


A 




o 


+j 




u 




-a 


Oh 


^ 


01 








>> 
> 


E 



£ 



CO 

H 

C 

o 
cd 



o 

c 



- 



< 



o> 

* M 

bc.2 
E J2 

ft M 
a o> 

A- -P 

<o-a 



&c 



0> g 



> c 



E 


Sh SI 


rSS 


A o3 


_ 03 


sg 


c n 


j£H 


IS'p 


t»E 


o> 5* 


T3 2 


C]> w 


3^ 


tf2 fa 


H, £ 



rj >- ca 





+-> 










OJO 


03 




E 












T3 




0) 


C 


IS 


3 


03 


iS 


I &D 


,E 


03 


P. 

o> 


O 

+-> 
03 


'5 


M 


£ 


£ 1 



Oh 




ojo 

Ejj 



shCQ 

6j0-p 
U O 
Oh O 



ft 

.s 

— IS ° 0) ' 

« S (8 ft' g I 3 

'pjS H0^^ M ! 03 



a 

o 

o 

IS 

Ph 



s 

u 

PQ 






It 


o 


03 


-p 


hJ 


rt 




d 


01 


u 






o 


03 


O) 


CJ 


s 


T3 


s 


ft 


o 


03 


U 


Oh 



c 

offl 

03 _!_> 



jh o> © 

Oh SQ> 



T3 

E 

03 

^0Q 
o 

-p ^ 

"E 0J 



E o3 , 0)7^ 
CCH ! Ph> 











fH 














0> 


*H 


w 


M 








r* 


o> 


E 








*H 


A 


o 


03 
H 

E 


T3 
0) 

o 

ft 


ojo 
s 


o> 


o 
> 


o 

03 

H 


E 

.2 


> 


E 
6 


ft 

E 
i— i 


O 




VI 


E 
o 


5 


O 


£ 


«! 


m 


O 



C2 



cq 



Q 



S A » 






CQ 



ai E 
o 

OJO g 

c S 

03 



03 3^ 03 











-p 












E 












o 












ft 










bfl 


03 






e^« 




c 


u 






13 




T3 


XJ 




GO 


PQ 
-p 

O) 


E 


Oh 

o> 


E 
03 

E 


m 


E 

C 


A4 


M 


'o 


'ft 

03 


E 


o> 


03 


a 




o> 


H 


m 


H 


H 


u 


H 



n: 



W « 

w 
o 

S , Oh 

s i o 



PQ 



Oh 

w 
o 

Q 

X 
H 

Pi 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



53 



C 

— 
c 
o 



J2j 



c 

CO 



s 



>» 

x 

Oh 



























bC 


® X 






















CU 






"3 


cu 


















o 


aC 








O 


C 


IS 




"3 








—. 




«H 


C3 






u 




S 


u 












CD 




H-> 


(J -1 




&0 


03 


-wXi 


o 















+J 








c 


c 

•-H 

o 

-3 

IS 




O © 


ecj 


CO 


CU 

3 
u 

o 
> 


Esfi 

CO 

+3 

y 

0) 
ft 
as 
o 


'E 


bti 
3 

'53 

a 


s 

CU 
ft 


s 

CO 

o 
*H 

> 


3 

-P 

3 


3^ 

o ^ 

bOX! 


.5 o 


o 

'•+3 

to 

a> 
3 
O 1 


ft 

a> 
+3 
-u 
eu 

CS 


s 

eg 

CO 

CO 

X! 




3 




O 


cu 


O 


o o 


-3^-1 
H O 


o 


o 


3 


o cu 


CD 




fe 


Ph 


W 


Pm 


X 


^ 


Q 


o is 


^ 


£ 


O" 


O & 


X 



s 




£ 




o 




"3 co 




C C 




* £ 




co O 




T3 in 




cpq 




cu 




• -. +3 





ft~ £ * 
O O tf, 

fti-5 =t cu 

- > 

>-.. M '43-J3 

hJOh > £ 







>> 






be 




H 






.3 


C3 


0) 




CO 


ft 

0) 
0) 


s 

o 

3 


CO 

o 


1 


^ 


o 


+-> 


o 


o 
o 


*H 

°3 


bo 


cu 

-4-3 

cu 


3 
o 
o 


pq 


04 


H 


« 


w 



01 



o 



c 5 ■ -° 

•ri CO r-| 

XI C 

"3+3 cu 

C CU U ' j- 

ccj ' cu O S 

h ftX V 

EH COM 04 



pq 



cu 


*h 


w 


CU 


-t-3 


X 


o 


o 


CO 


3 


f-t 


CU 


Oh 


H 



























o 










-*^> 


o 








HJ 


cu 


X 








3 


3 


V, 








CU 


"3 1 














£« 


ojo 


3 




CB 


•S 1 
'+-> 

u 


3 

IS 

s 


.5 

'43 
3 
Xi 
cu 


co^S 

^ 3 


be 

_3 
03 


3 

.° 
'co 

3 


H 


P 


O-i G 


o 


s 


D-, 



CU o 

ft T3 M 



CV2 ! W 



>. 








u 








3 








3 








O 
















CO 








co 
















a 




3 


3 


CU 

s 


3 


0) 
ft 


«4H 

XI 


o 


o 


o 


3 


X 


h-1 


ffi 


fe 



3 >» 
o 

Sh CU 
U2 ^> 



M 



?3 C 
3 

Oh a 
3 



CO 




+J 












H-> 




cc 




3 




O 




OC 

3 


bfi 
3 


^J 








3 


a 



5 3 



EG 



cu 



CJ 



3 



E/3 



ffl 



cu.-3 

Jh CU 

ft^ 



CO (h 

3 cu 
cu-ii 
> Fh 
cu o 



u 


<< 


s 


P4 


< 


ta 


2 


CO 




<j 




Oh 




^3 




<! 




H-I 



o 

J 

<: 

05 

w 

•x 



w 




o 




w 
X 






PQ 
pq 


u 


C3 


<1 


>H 


hJ 


^ 


05 


<< 



Eh 
X 
O 



CO 

M 

Q 

<J I ^ 
< w 



o X 

+3 

. "2 

00 3 

- « .s s; 

3x r^^ 

BO Xw 



bfi 

3 ,_ 

T5 CJ 



pq 



pq 



M 




W 

1 « 

W 


04 

o 


<1 


s 


> 




« 


<n 


H 


04 


£ 


p 




< 


§ 


J 



04 


fH 


04 
H 




w 


Q 


>H 


h-1 ! 


pq 
O 






04 

W 


^ 


N 


S 


a 


04 

w 
> 


04 




<; 


X 


K 


H 


i-4 


Oh 


'A 


CO 


O 


w 


< 



54 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 




^J 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



55 



*» '* 1 ' * * f . t *« 






Members of the Elizabethtown Volunteer Band 



Rear Row, left to right — Clarence Holsopple, Alvin Brightbill, Kathryn Moyer, La- 
men Beck, *Emma Ziegler (corresponding secretary), Daniel Myers, *Mary Crouse, 
Ira Brandt, *Minerva Reber. 

Next Row, left to right — Edward Ziegler (treasurer), *Vera Hackman, Francis 
Barr, *Mary B. Royer, A. C. Baugher, Martha Martin, *Grant Weaver, *Laura Moyer, 
Poster Bittinger. 

Next Row left, to right — Roy Miller, Jesse Reber (Vice-president), David Bright- 
bill, *Chester H. Royer (president), Mrs. Chester H. Royer, *Nathan Meyer, Ezra 
Wenger, Enos Weaver. 

Next Row, left to right — Ilda Bittinger, ::: Laura Hershey (recording secretary), 

Florence Moyer, * Lottie Nies (librarian), Stella Walker. 

Those not in the picture — Ephraim Meyer, (chorister), Mrs. A. C. Baugher. 
(*) Seniors. * Arthur Moyer, *01iver Zendt, Esther Leiter. 



56 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



An Opportunity for Christian Growth 



Surely, if any one reason can be 
given that has placed America on 
the high position which she has held 
among the nations of the world, it 
is the open Bible. In fact, this was 
the reason why many of the early 
settlers sought our shores. But, if 
we would maintain this high ideal 
which has been an outstanding 
characteristic of our nation, if we 
wish to foster this ideal in our na- 
tion, as well as enlighten other na- 
tions, we must train our future 
leaders that they will be able to up- 
hold this purpose in our land. 

In order that this may be done it 
is an absolute essential that educa- 
tional institutions which are taking 
upon themselves the great responsi- 
bility of training community, state, 
national and world leaders, bear in 
mind that it is largely up to them to 



uphold the high purpose of our na- 
tion. 

We, the senior class of Elizabeth- 
town College, believe that our school 
has kept in mind this national and 
world need. Our senior class has 
taken an active part in promoting 
the religious interests of the school, 
thereby showing that we have re- 
ceived more than mental training. 

We have only two members in 
our class that are not members of 
any church. Two are members of 
the Reformed church. Two are 
members of the Church of God. 
One is a member of the United Zion 
Church. There are twenty-nine 
members of the Church of the 
Brethren. Fourteen are student 
volunteers, while others are active 
church workers and Sunday School 
teachers. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



57 



N.Q.Mtyei; 



45 



J i J .i l^-U 



4 



jteyty 



fc£ 



H 



P 



fc*2 



Have you heard the calif or teachers Who are trained beyond demands' 
Business too has set new standards Which we hope to still advance. 
Do you know the need for artists Who are trained in heart and hand 
We do love thee Alma Mater; Thou haet standards we must spread. 



*=£=? 



*=£ 



■^ 







■m 0- 



:=zzPzz:/--. ^- ' I L 



i 



I 



N k 



S I 1 I 



33 



^3 



^^ 



We will rally forth as leaders Whom the state now recommends. 
Wewill fill the bill in commerce, Or a job such as finance. 
We will sing and play the sweetest, Till we reach the better Land, 
We will not forget the power of a life divinely led. 

■ffc--ffc 



■m — o- 



g ^ — ^» - 1 1 



2 



^ 



Chorus . 




UHM i lWjJ ^ 



:c 



Let ua e«t the echoes ringing Thru these halls so long sublime, 



t roffi 



p 



H§i 



»+-» 



¥ 



^ 



r 



=5 



hk 



L^ 



& 



fe=l 



^ 



3 



13 



fc£ 



j . 3 i» i 



While we give our motto, singing, Others! Others! all the time, 



&-p 



65 



B^= 



P^ £ 



2Z 



u 



f 



2- 



^ 



58 OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



CLASS POEM, '21 



To-day wo come into this hall 
The class of '21, with fame we 
In E. C.'s annals take our place and 
With credit leave our Alma Mater. 



Before life's threshold eager we stand, 
With joy expectant we look forward. 
Bright prospects ever beckon onward 
To tasks of service, love and lovalty. 



Alluring is the chance of fortune. 
Ambition strives first place to gain, but 
May we the Master's will obey and 
Of Him be true and faithful followers. 



May "Others" ever be our motto 

As to calls for service we respond. 

May we to our colors brown and buff 

Be true and to them bring praise and glory. 

W T e love our Alma Mater dear, 
With hearts of hope and cheer we 
Her fame uphold and her praises send 
From shore to shore in loving service. 

Thru four short years of college spent here 
On College Hill, we worked and planned. 
With strength and courage we go forward, 
With purpose firm we meet life's challenge. 

And now has come the time when we 
Adieu must bid to teachers, comrades, 
Classmates, sorrowful we part and 
Behind us memories fond we leave. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



59 



In the Land of Obscurity 

In order that a wall may be firm 
and beautiful in structure some 
stones must be buried deep be- 
neath the surface of the earth to 
support the upper parts and give 
the structure stability and per- 
manence. The stones above are ex- 
posed to public view and their posi- 
tions are more conspicious, especial- 
ly the capstones which give a wall 
the touch of completeness. As 
stones in the wall occupy different 
positions so human beings fill dif- 
ferent places in the building of na- 
tions. 

The president of the U. S. to- 
gether with his cabinet the gov- 
ernors of the different states, and 
their associates officers, the 
prominent preachers and lecturers 
in the world, all these may be com- 
pared to capstones in a wall be- 
cause of the prominent positions 
they hold. 

But stop with me for a moment 
and think of the thousands of men 
and women who are today working 
in mines, in shops, on vessels, on 
railway trains in mountain fastness- 
es, and in other obscure places. The 
miner goes down into the dirt and 
darkness, into the midst of gases 
and fumes to bring forth diamonds, 
precious stones and coal, adding to 
the world's vast wealth, helping 
our industries, transportation and 
lighting systems, making our home 
warm and cosy. 

The Commodores, captains, and 
admirals on vessels hold rather pro- 
minent places, and are often lauded 
for their skill in directing the course 
.of vessels over the billowy sea, but 



the many men working in crews 
under these officers are hardly ever 
spoken of in song or story. 

Think of the thousands of en- 
gineers and firemen on trains who 
day after day stand faithfully at 
their posts of duty and are given 
very little honor for the great work 
they do. Few, few are the men like 
the late Theodore Roosevelt who 
when he reached his destination af- 
ter a long trip would step up to the 
engineer, shake his hand and thank 
him for bringing him safely to his 
journey's end. All these are living 
in obscurity, as it were, away from 
human gaze and human praise just 
like the stones in the wall that are 
beneath the surface of the earth, 
yet they are of absolute necessity 
in the fabric of human society. 

How few persons know that as- 
tronomers go up into solitary moun- 
tains above the clouds for months 
and years, to study the planets and 
stars, so that we may better know 
the effect these planets have on 
climate and human conditions, and 
better comprehend the vastness of 
creation. 

What secret things have been re- 
vealed thru the scientist who in or- 
der to discover the fundamental 
laws of the physical universe, shuts 
himself up in a laboratory and 
works days, weeks, months and years 
amidst gases, fumes and dangerous 
explosives; in the midst of ridicule, 
contempt and misunderstanding un- 
til he gives the world his discovery 
which means so much to humanity 
at large. Galileo who discovered 
the laws of the pendulum was cast 
into prison for his new, yet true 
ideas about the laws of nature. The 



60 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



discoverer of radium who was an 
obscure woman in Paris conferred 
an untold blessing to mankind by 
giving to it a remedy for cancer, 
and other most terrible diseases 
which attack the race. Many of 
these uncrowned heroes die in the 
laboratory and are seldom rec- 
ognized as fundamental pillars of 
human progress. 

In the field of literature how 
many beautiful characters there are 
in obscure positions who have 
given us the foundation of our cul- 
ture and refinement! Homer, Mil- 
ton and our own Fanny Crosby in 
physical blindness blessed the world 
by their uplifting poems. Homer's 
Iliad rings down thru the ages 
giving thousands of individuals new 
courage and inspiration. Milton, 
during his early life, was wrapped 
up in political affairs and was 
stricken blind; then in his obscurity 
the spiritual light broke upon him 
and he saw heaven and hell, and 
the lost condition of man and he 
pictured these with all their dismal 
despair and realistic hope in his in- 
spiring portrayal in "Paradise 
Lost," and "Paradise Regained." 
Who is not thrilled by the beauti- 
ful gospel hymns written by Fanny 
Crosby? Who can tell how many 
souls have been led closer to God, 
and received new hope thru her im- 
mortal work? Had these not been 
doomed to this darkness, their 
spiritual eyes might not have been 
opened and they might never have 
gotten a vision of spiritual glory as 
they did. 

The ideal benefactors to man- 
kind are those who live in obscurity, 
not for selfish motives or because 



they are obliged to, but because of 
their zeal and devotion to a right- 
eous cause. Mothers as a class are 
destined to live in privacy, but many 
gladly choose to serve in the ob- 
scure position of motherhood for 
their offspring, hoping thus indirect- 
ly to benefit the race. No human 
tongue can ever extol the far-reach- 
ing influence of a good mother; and 
every intelligent man and woman 
will agree that the hand that rocks 
the cradle is the hand that rules the 
world. 

During the middle ages the 
monks and pietists in their en- 
thusiasm for the gospel religion and 
learning, shut themselves away 
from the world to preserve with 
their pens and parchments for the 
coming generations valuable litera- 
ture and fundamental Truths, in- 
cluding the Word of God. 

The Church fathers, early 
Apostles and Christian martyrs en- 
dured imprisonment, persecution, 
perils and agonies of death because 
of a burning passion to lift hu- 
manity to higher ground. They 
have become the solid rocks under 
the surface upon which the future 
could build. Had it not been for 
those who spread Christianity we 
still would be groping in heathen 
darkness and ignorance. Had John 
the Revelator not chosen to be cast 
on the lonely isle rather than give 
up his faith we would not have that 
picture of the Eternal Home as we 
have today. 

What a rock in obscurity is our 
modern missionary! Because of his 
self denial, love of mankind, devo- 
tion to Truth and Duty, reverence 
for God, he wills to go into a be- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



61 



nighted land, give up all hopes of 
wealth, fame and honor, bury his 
life in heathen darkness for the up- 
lift and salvation of human souls, 
God mightily uses those who are 
willing to live in the land of ob- 
scurity so as to bless the present 
and future generations. 

How few people are willing to la- 
bor faithfully and patiently in the 
more obscure walks of life so that 
God's design may be carried out? 

Will there not be more stars in 
the crowns of the good faithful 
mothers, the blind obscure poets, 
the humble toilers in th mines, in 
the laboratories, on the mission 
fields than in the crowns of those 
occupying the capstone positions of 
the world? 

Why then strive for the most 
prominent positions in the world? 
Why give all our time, talents, and 
energy to bring us fame and 
popularity which lasts but a mo- 
ment and then burst and disappear 
like soap bubbles in the air? 
Why all this toil for triumph of an 

hour? 
What tho' we wade in wealth and 

soar in fame ; 
Earth's highest station ends in, 
"Here he lies, and 
Dust to dust completes each earthly 

life." 



The Paradox of the Ages 

In every part of the organic 
world there prevails an unwritten 
law — nay not unwritten, but un- 
noticed because our eyes are blind. 
W may anoint our eyes and see this 
law. See it as it is taught by Na- 



ture, see it in the development of 
human life, and see it in the life of 
the race : Adversity leads to Pros- 
perity; this is the Paradox of the 
Ages. 

Let us see this Paradox as it is 
exemplified in the physical realm. 
In the vegetable kingdom we find 
that plants have to encounter many 
obstacles which make their exist- 
ence difficult. Each morning glory 
develops several thousand seeds 
and each of these seeds its thous- 
ands. It is not difficult to see that 
the offspring of a single plant 
would by this geometric progression 
soon actually cover the entire sur- 
face of the earth. But adversity in 
the form of excessive heat, drought, 
floods, frost, and parasitic plants al- 
lows only the survival of the fittest. 
Adversity is the selective process 
and the developing agent of plant 
life. 

This same law is no less true in 
the animal kingdom. Animals 
when born are little, helpless, ugly 
creatures. Their size, lack of power 
and beauty are in themselves ad- 
verse conditions. But in addition, 
parent animals, especially the birds, 
increase this adversity, as is seen 
when a mother bird stirs up her nest 
causing her young to use their ten- 
der wings lest they fall to death. It 
seems that animals instinctively 
know that struggle begets strength. 

This very law is more clearly ob- 
servable in the development of hu- 
man life. Beginning with the first 
cries of the little child and extending 
to the time when it leaves its out- 
grown shell, we may see this para- 
dox. The youth who unlocks the 
door of opportunity and makes his 



62 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



mark in the world fights his way to 
his loaf. What others do for him 
does not amount to much in com- 
parison with what he does for him- 
self. The pampered youth, who is 
brought up in luxury and is not ob- 
liged to work, whose strength is 
never called upon, rarly discovers 
what there is in him. It is the boys 
who are bound out, that usually 
"turn out," while those who are 
pampered fail to "come out." You 
cannot keep a determined gritty 
youth from success. Put stumbling 
blocks in his way and he takes them 
for stepping stones. Take away his 
money and he will make a fortune 
out of his poverty. Put him in a log 
cabin in the wilderness and we may 
later find him in the White House. 

Failure to recognize this law 
sometimes causes the youth to 
shrink from certain things. He per- 
haps detests a slim menu, an eight 
hour night, or a chaperon in society. 
He may fail to see that to deprive 
himself of temporary pleasures is 
merely a blessing in disguise. Con- 
sequently he often needs to be 
turned out of a home on earth that 
he may seek a home in Heaven. 
Adversity drives the Prodigal home. 

Some of our greatest men of His- 
tory never discovered this law until 
they had lost everything but their 
pluck and grit; not until they were 
driven to despair did they invent a 
way out of their dilemma. It took 
a man who spent most of his time 
in trying things that wouldn't work 
to invent an electric light. Millet 
passed thru the furnace of poverty 
and sorrow ere he could paint an 
"Angelus." If God puts you in the 
fiery furnace of adversity be thank- 



ful; it is because he sees some gold 
in you. It took twelve years of 
filthy imprisonment to make John 
Bunyan enrich the world with the 
greatest of allegories, "Pilgrim's 
Progress," who can tell how much 
we are indebted to the fact that the 
Pilgrims and the Quakers, being im- 
prisoned repeatedly for their re- 
ligious convictions, were finally 
driven to found a colony in the new 
world? Even to reveal the prin- 
ciples and personality of God it took 
a life of unique service and su- 
preme sacrifice. It seems God's peo- 
ple are like birds; they sing best in 
cages. 

As we look into the past we can- 
not help but see with what tenacity 
the whole human race survives. 
Earthquakes, war, famine, pesti- 
lence have done their worst, but 
over them all rolls a healing tide of 
years, and they are lost to our view; 
on sweeps the great procession and 
hardly shows a scar. Rulers around 
whom clustered new forms of civil- 
ization pass away; but greater men 
succeed them. Nations are rooted 
up; great hopes soon blighted; 
revolutions rise, and rivers run with 
the blood of patriots and martyrs; 
the globe itself seems headed to- 
ward the abyss. But new patriots 
are born; higher hopes bloom like 
stars ; humanity emerges from the 
dark ages vastly ahead of what it 
was on entering that cave of gloom, 
and ever the right comes upper- 
most. Even upon the blood-covered 
soil of Armenia and of other coun- 
tries there are beginning to appear 
the green shoots of a glorious har- 
vest. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



63 



O Alma Mater! Blood-bought in- 
stitution ! Thou wilt prosper. The 
Divine Paradox of the Ages proves 
thy destiny. Thy adversity of today 
foreshadows thy success of tomor- 
row. 

O Sons and Daughters of the Blue 
and Gray! Are you convinced that 
there is no open door to the Temple 
of Prosperity? Do you realize that 
every one who enters its jocund 
halls of bliss forges his own key? 
Dare to realize that "successful 
failure" is the great birth agony of 
immortal powers, the great search- 
er and revealer of hearts, and the 
great test of truth and righteous- 
$ ness. Ah yes, 'tis often the darkest 
ere the dawn. A little more per- 
sistence, courage, vim. Success will 
dawn over fortune's cloudy rim. 
Then take this honey for the bitter- 
est cup; there is no failure save in 
giving up. May pulpit and press 
>. with tongue and with pen set to new 
music this message to men: "Fail- 
ure is not failure, save from with- 
in." Unless you're beaten there 
you're bound to win. 



The Undertaker's Assistant 

The man who rocked the boat; 

The man who didn't know it was 
loaded ; 

The man who blew out the gas; 

The man who drank wood Alco- 
hol. 



A — What is heredity? 

B. — Something a father believes 
in until his son begins acting like a 
fool. 



Miss Ziegler after hearing some 
speaker tell how powerful music 
was so that it charmed beasts, re- 
marked after a song had been sung, 
that she was greatly charmed. 



Prof. Nye inquired one Monday 
morning whether Mr. Sherman was 
ill because he was absent. The 
class informed him that Mr. Sher- 
man had important business in Hat- 
field, having motored there and 
being properly chaperoned. 



Revenge is sweet as is also a box 
of caremels. 



Miss H. when asked why a cer- 
tain picture was missing on her 
dresser replied. "It is getting so 
full I must take some off." 



Miss Fogelsanger was heard to 
say she wished she were a cat so 
she could catch Mr. Mauss. (mouse) 



Information Bureau 

Automobile — From English 

"ough to" and 

Latin "moveo" — to move. 

Cinder — One of the first things to 
catch your eye in traveling. 

Snore — An unfavorable report 
from headquarters. 

Spinster — An ember from which 
the sparks have flown. 

Tobacco — A nauseating plant 
that is consumed by but two crea- 
tures — large green worm and man. 



64 OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



jOOOOOGOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOGKXX)OOOOOOOCXXXXXXXXXX>OOOC}0000( 

W. S. SMITH, President PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MaRTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

ELIZABETHTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL $100,000.00 

SURPLUS & PROFITS 144,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited Interest Paid On Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent 

DIRECTORS: 

W. S. Smith Elmer W. Strickler Peter N. Rutt 

F. W. Groff J. S. Risser B. L. Geyer 

E. C. Ginder Amos P. Coble E. E. Coble 

>OOOOOC)0000(XXXXXXXXXXX)OCX}00000000000000000000000000000000000' 



|OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO< 

ELIZABETHTOWN EXCHANGE BANK 




Now Occupies Its New Bank Building 
Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 

Pays Interest on Time Deposits 

OFFICERS 

A. G. HEISEY, President ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier 
I. H. STAUFFER, Asst. Cashier C. A. COBLE, Teller 

DIRECTORS 

A. G. Heisey Henry E Landig B. H. Greider 

Allen A. Coble ^ t^ x> M. K. Forney 

tt T /-• u Geo. D. Boggs TTT . TT7 .,, 

H. J. Gish W. A. Withers 

Jos. G. Heisey E - E - Hernley A c Fridy 

»ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooc 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



65 



B i El n !5 



PLAIN 
CLOTHING 



WATT & SHAND 

Centre Square LANCASTER, PA. 



» GEORGE S. DAUGHERTY GO, 



DODGE BROTHERS MOTOR CARS 

R. H. FORNEY 

GARAGE AND REPAIR SHOP 



*T XT 1 ^U« 1V*4 U ° n N ° rth Market Street 

N. York--Chicago--Pittsburg elizabethtown, . : . penna. 



Quality No. 10 fruits and vege- 
tables in No. 10 tins. 



CHAS. B. DIEROLF 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



PATRONIZE 

OUR 

ADVERTISERS 



66 OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



^ SINCE THE DAYS OF THE GOLDSMITHS 

\ The goldsmiths of olden times, with whom banking had its be- jj 

I ginning, undertook only to safeguard money and valuables en- > 

\ trusted to their care. > 

$ Banks have increased their activities since that time until they 5 

\ have become an indipensable factor in the finance and commerce * 

\ of all civilized nations. > 

I The modern business man and woman who make full use of I 

i their bank looks upon it as an institution dealing in business in- 5 

\ telligence as well as money and credit. } 

I We invite business men and women to make use of all our fa- l 

i cilities for service. I 

The Farmers' National Bank 

5 LITITZ, PENNA. 

\ S. W. Buch, President J. H. Breitigan, Cashier. I 

K}Qqqqqqqqqqqooooqqqqqqqqoqqqqqooqqqooqqoqooqqqqc&oqqoooqqqqqz 

I 000000000(X)OOOOOGOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC500000000000000000000000000 ( 

KEYSTONE NATIONAL BANK 

MANHEIM, PENNSYLVANIA 

CAPITAL $ 125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS 165,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 1,500,000 

FOUR PER CENT. INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS 
ACCOUNTS LARGE OR SMALL SOLICITED 

OFFICERS 
John B. Shenk, President 
H. M. Beamesderfer, Vice-President H. A. Merkey, Teller 

J. G. Graybill, Cashier Norman Weaver, Clerk 

Clair H. Keen, Asst. Cashier Anna Shollenberger, Clerk 

DIRECTORS 

H. M. Beamesderfer . , ~ „ , R. O. Diehl 

¥ . _ „ , Jacob L». riershey 

John R. Cassel John B. Hossler 

Morris B. Ginder J - B - Shenk w w Moyer 

OUR TRUST DEPARTMENT CAN SERVE YOU AS 

Executor, Administrator, Assignee, Receiver, Guardian 
Agent, Attorney in Fact, Registrar 
OF STOCKS AND BONDS, ETC. 

3 oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo \ 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



67 



Trimmer's Great 
Bargain Emporium 

On the Square 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



Elizabethtown Roller Mills 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 
FLOUR, CORN MEAL AND FEED 



J. V. BINKLEY, Propr. 

402-404 South Market St. 
Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Pa. 



McLaughlin Bros. 
DRAYMEN 



LOCAL, LONG DISTANCE HAULING 
26 Washington Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
BELL PHONE 39-R2 

MARTIN 

READY-MADE AND MADE-TO-ORDER 
MEN'S AND BOYS* 

CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS AND SHOES 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



joooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooos 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MOUNT JOY, PA. 



Thomas J. Brown 
Jacob S. Carmany 
H. H. Myers 
Abraham L. Nissley 



directors: 

Gabriel Moyer 
Jos. B. Hostetter 
B. S. Stauffer 
Jno. W. Newcomer 

Amos N. Musser 



H. Roy Nissley 
Jacob N. Hershey 
E. S. Gerberich 
Henry H. Eby 



Capital $125,000.00 



Surplus & Profits $150,000.00 



officers: 

THOMAS J. BROWN, President J. S. CARMANY, Vice Fresident 

R. FELLENBAUM, Cashier 

4% Paid on Savings Accounts and Time Certificates. Resources $1,600,000 
5O0O000000000000O0OOC3O0O000000OOOOO0000000000O0O00000000000O0C 



08 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SOUTH END GROCERY 

FRESH, FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES, CANDIES AND LUNCH GOODS 
"The little store with big business" 

Levi C. Hershey 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



A. W. CAIN 

DRUGGIST 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 

THE BETTER REPAIRING OF THE 

BARNES SHOE SHOP 

WILL GRATIFY YOU 

It's Real Economy 

43 South Market St ELIZABETHTOWN 

NISSLEY'S LUNCH & DINING ROOMS 

David D. Clare, Proprietor 

14-16 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER. PENNA, 



LANCASTER SCHOOL SUPPLY CO. 

L. B. Herr & Son 
Booksellers 

Stationeries 

Printers 

46-48 W. King St. LANCASTER, PA. 

THE GROSS 
CONFECTIONERY 

122 S. Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



BARD-BLANKENMYER CO., Inc. 

plumbingTheating 

and SHEET METAL WORK 



118 South Queen Street, 



LANCASTER, PA. 



GUNSMITH 



LOCKSMITH 



DOMNITZ BROS. 

If it's a (LOCK) key, we have it 
222Vz N. Q. St. LANCASTER, PA. 



A. C. McLANACHAN 
BARBER 

21 E. High St 

Second Door From Post Office 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



69 



BUCH MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



WE BUILD THE FOLLOWING GOODS IN 

THE COLLEGE TOWN 



Wheelbarrows, Corn Shelters, Wood Saws, 
Land Rollers, Pulverizers, Water Troughs 



HENRY L. GISE 



} Notary Public, Surveyor and Conveyancer 

Insurance of all Kinds 

Agent for 

State Capital Savings and Loan 

Association 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

, J. W. G. Hershey, Pres. 

J. Bitzer Johns, V. Pres. 

Henry R. Gibbel, Sec. & Treas. 



PHONOGRAPHS 

We handle only one make and that is the 



EDISON £7, v , 


7 
at 


FISHER 


'S 


8 Centre Square 




ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 





The Lititz Agricultural 

Mutual Fire 

Insurance Company 



Insures against Lightning, Storm and Fir* 

Insurance in force $39,000,000 
Issues both Cash and Assessment Policies 



EBY SHOE COMPANY 

Incorporated 
Manufacturers of 

MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S 

FINE WELT AND TURNED 

SHOES 



13 EAST MAIN STREET 
LITITZ, PENNA. 



LITITZ, 



PENNA. 



70 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO( 

HEATING and PLUMBING 



Miller Pipeless Furnaces 

and 
Leader Water Systems 



LEO KOB 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



J. W. ZMRPD88 

GENERAL HARDWARE 

Sporting and Housefurnishing 
Goods 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



POTTS DEPARTMENT STORE 
"EPHRATA'S BIGGEST BEST STORE" 

EBERLY BROTHERS 
SHOES COAL 

Main & State S. State St. 



Ephrata, Pa. 



The Ephrata Review 

$1.50 A YEAR 

Best Job Printing 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



Chas. S. Yeager, Propr, 



CHAS. K. MUSSER 



Electrical 
Cont^rctor 

All Kinds of 

Electrical Supplies and Fixtures 

HOUSE WIRING A SPECIALTY 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



71 



JOOOOOOOOOOCXXXXXXX^OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXXXXXKXXXXXXXXdOOOOOOOOOO. 



HIVE 




HIVE 



DEPARTMENT STORE 



OUR CREED 



We believe in the goods we are selling in our ability 
to get results. We believe that honest goods can be sold 
to honest people by honest methods. We believe in work- 
ing, not wasting; in laughing, not crying; in boosting, 
not knocking; and in the pleasure of doing business. We 
believe that a man gets what he goes after; that a cus- 
tomer today is worth two customers tomorrow; and that 
no man is down and out until he has lost faith in himself. 
We believe in courtesy, in kindness, in generosity, in good 
cheer, in friendship, and in honest competition. We be- 
lieve in increasing our business, and that the way to do 
it is to reach for it. 



WE ARE REACHING FOR YOURS 

A. A. ABELE 

ELIZABETHTOWN. 
oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo^ 



72 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Darby Brand Canned Foods Are Quality 
Packed. Packed Exclusively For 

Comly, Flanigen & Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 

118 & 120 So., Delaware Ave., Phila. 

Ask Your Dealer For Darby Brand 
A Trial will convince 



A. B. DRACE 
PAINTER 

AND 

PAPER HANGER 

S. Market St. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



COLLEGE JEWELRY OF THE BETTER 
SORT 

J. F. APPLE CO. 

MANUFACTURING 
JEWELER 

College and Fraternity Pins, Rings, Medals 

Prize Cups, Foot Balls, Basket Balls 

120 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. Box 570 

DR. S. J. HEINDEL & SON 

DENTIST 

Out-of-Town Friday each week 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

HEADQUARTERS FOR MAGAZINES 

Subscriptions and Counter Sales 

Best Display in County 

THE ROOT MAGAZINE AGENCY 

21 W. High St. Elizabethtown, Pa. 



» OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC500000000000000 ( 

FOR PHOTOGRAPHS 

CALL AT BISHOP'S 

New and Modern Studio 

Elizabethtown, Penna. 
We Guarantee All Work 

See us before having your diploma or those pictures framed. 

AMATEUR FINISHING SOLICITED 

EASTMAN LINE OF KODAKS AND FILMS FOR SALE 



>oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo * 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



73 



Franklin & Marshall College 



LANCASTER, 



PENNA. 



Offers Liberal Courses in Arts and Sciences 

Campus of 54 acres tfiih ten bulletin.' 
including Gymnasium and complete Ath- 
letic Field. 

For Catalogue apply to 
HENRY H. APPLE, D.D., LL.D., Pre.. 



GO TO 

HORSTS 

CENTRE SQUARE 

for 

Oysters, Ice Cream, Confectionery 



GANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor. North Queen & Orange Streets 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



Men's 
Reliable Outfitters 

Suits to measure from $35 to $65 

Ready made Suits for Young Men from 
$25.00 to $35.00 

Plain Suits Constantly on Hand from 
$25.00 to $35.00 



Waterman Fountain Pens 

— AT— 

Ream's Book Store 



Y. M. C. A. BUILDING 
LANCASTER, - : - PENNA. 

H. H. GOOD 

Central Meat Market 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 



Bell Phone 31R4 
ELJZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

LANCASTER SANITARY MILK CO. 



PASTURIZED MILK 

AND 
CREAMERY BUTTER 



One Price — Always the Lowest 



PURITY ICE CREAM 

North and Frederick Sts. 
BOTH PHONES, LANCASTER, PA. 

CLOTHING FOR THE MAN OR BOY 

Complete line of 

SUITS & OVERCOATS 

Suits made to your measure. Men's 
furnishing a specialty. Best make of Shoes 
of all kinds for Men, Ladies and Children. 

Agent for first-class Laundry 



J. N. OLWEILER 
Near Centre Square Elizabethtown 



74 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



EAT 

GUnzenhaUsers Bread 

Delivered by 

E. C. HEILMAN 

Opposite P. R. R. Station Elizabethtown 

Save Your Money by Bringing Your Shoes 

to 

E. W. MILLER 

DEALER IN SHOE FINDINGS 

All Kinds of 

Rubbers and Shoe Repairing Neatly Done 

221 South Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, :-: :-: PENNA. 



LUMBER 

AND 

MILL WORK 



We saw timbers 80 ft. and longer and 
deliver a barn complete in a couple weeks. 



B. F. Hiestand & Sons 



MARIETTA, 



PENNA. 



When In Need Of 

SHOES 

WHICH WILL GIVE YOU EXTREMELY LONG WEAR COME TO 

The W. A. Withers Shoe Co. 

OLD MARKET HOUSE BLDG. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Prompt, Caretul Attention Given To Mail Orders 

^oqqqqooooqqoqoqqqqqqqoqgooqqqoqoqqoqooqqqqqqqooqqoqooooqqqoqi 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



75 



QUALITY 

LEBANON 

BOLOGNA 

Made in the Most Modern and 

Sanitary Plant 
Manufacturing this Famous Product 



'MORRIS SUPREME" 

FOOD PRODUCTS 

Advertised and known over the 
Entire World 

THE LEBANON BOLOGNA 
and 

PROVISION CO. 

D. B. Buck, Secretary and Mgr, 

H. W. Buck, Distributor 



CLASS PINS AND RINGS 

For Colleges, High Schools, Sunday 
Schools, etc. Illustrated catalog mailed 
upon request. We are also Headquarters 
for Colleges and High School pennants. 
Let us know your wants. 

UNION EMBLEM CO. 
Dept. 89, Palmyra, Pa. 




FDU^iliNiPEN 




Imade on honor-builjfor servTce! 



Base Ball and Lawn Tennis Goods 

Foot Ball and Basket Ball Goods 

Sporting Goods Of All Kinds 

Books, Stationery and Office 

Supplies 

DUTEWEILER 

813 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, :-: PENNA. 



WHATEVER YOU NEED IN 

MERCHANDISE 

ALWAYS GO TO 

GREENBLATTS DEPT. STORE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 
IT WILL PAY YOU 



^oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo; 

DEMY 8c DETRA 

Dealers in 

FARM IMPLEMENTS AND REPAIRS, HUBER TRACTORS, GASOLINE AND 
OIL ENGINES, HAND AND POWER PUMPS 



REPAIRING A SPECIALTY 



Beli P h ho n ne 6 |3-R2 ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

^oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo^ 



76 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Conducted on Sanitary Principles 

is the 

RALPH GROSS 

SH A VI NG PARLOR 

Agency for Manhattan Laundry 


THE BEST THERE IS IN 

HARDWARE 

At the Lowest Possible Price 

BOGGS' QUALITY HARDWARE STORE 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



LEHMAN & WOLGEMUTH 

COAL 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED and FLOUR 
BOTH 'PHONES ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



JOHN M. SHOOKERS 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 

Repairing a Specialty 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 



Kodaks & Films Stationery 

H. K. DORSHEIMER 

Confections Athletic Goods 



OOOOOOOOOOOQQOOQQQOOOOOQQOOQOOOOOOOGQQQQQOOOOOOOOQOOOOQOQQGG( 

PIANOS-VICTROLAS 

Musical Instruments of Every Description 
Our Line Is Complete 



32 Makes of Pianos, 40 Styles 

Victor. Cheney, Star, Franklin and Solotone Phonograph 
Popular Sheet Music 9c a Copy 



CASH OR EASY PAYMENT PLAN 



KIRK JOHNSON & CO. 

16-18 W. King Street LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 

(q(XXXX>000006000000000000CX>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXXXX)00^ 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



77 



GO TO 



GUY The BARBER 

HE'S ON THE SQUARE 

Kwick-Lite, Flashlights 

Kyanize, Floor Finish 



Joseph H. Rider & Son 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



FOR GOOD EATS CALL AT 

Mornafiifs' Restaurant 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

OYSTERS IN SEASON 

ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO VISIT 

HIRSH & BRO. 

Centre Square, LANCASTER 

for 

Ready-Made and Made-to-Order 

Clothing tor Men and Boys 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS 



We are one of the largest manufacturers of 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

in the United States 



Strictly One Price To All 

Established in 1854 



KIEFFER & LANDIS 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

Real Estate 

Insurance Collections 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



BOOKS BIBLES 

STATIONERY 

Phonographs 



I. A. SHIFFER 



39 S. Market St. 



Elizabeth town 



COLLEGE HILL DAIRY 
PURE MILK AND CREAM 

Delivered Daily 

S. G. GRAYBILL 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

H. H. BRANDT 

Dealer in all kinds of 
BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE AND 
ROOFING PAPER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



CENTRAL 
MUSIC STORE 



Victrolas, Grafonolas, Records, Stringed 
Instruments, Stationery, Kodaks, Eastman 
Films, Waterman Fountain Pens and 
Greeting cards. 

Films Developed and Printed 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



r <8 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



>ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooocx>oooooooooo< 

H. C. Schock, President J. E. Longenecker, V. President 

H. N. Nissly, Cashier 

SECURITY PROGRESS 

UNION NATIONAL MOUNT JOY BANK 



MOUNT JOY, 



PENNA. 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus and Profits $264,000.00 

Deposits $1,324,871.00 

An Honor Roll National Bank, Being 421 in Strength in the United States and 

2nd in Lancaster County 

Resources $2,165,000.00 

All Directors Keep in Touch With the Bank's Affairs 

The Bank Board Consists of the Following: 

H. C. Schock Eli F. Grosh I. D. Stehman Christian L. Nissley 

J. E. Longenecker John G. Snyder J. W. Eshleman Johnson B. Keller 

T. M. Breneman Eli G. Reist Samuel B. Nissley S. N. Mumma 

Rohrer Stoner 

WE PAY 4% INTEREST ON CERTIFICATES AND SAVINGS 

ioooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo? 



SCHMIDT 
BAKERY 




INTING 



Harrisburg. Pa. 



For Schools, Colleges, Etc. is our hobby. 
The fact that we have a city equipped 
printing office in a country town, is suf- 
ficient evidence that we can do satis- 
factory work and last but not least, our 
prices are right. At present we are print- 
ing many monthlies for schools thruout 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This book- 
let is the product of our office. If the work 
appeals to you, get our price on your 
publication. 



The BULLETIN 

Jno. E. Schroll, Propr. 

MOUNT JOY, PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



79 



THE WILLEY COMPANY INC. 

Superior Laundry Machinery 



FACTORY COLUMBIA, PENNA. 



OFFICE PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



109 East King Street 




Lancaster, Penna. 



JACOB FISHER 

8 Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
WATCHMAKER & JEWELER 
With you for 40 years that's all 
From 10 to 20 per cent, lower than the 
lowest for the same grade of make. 




Seller's Kitchen Cabinet, the best ser- 
vant in your house. I have just received 
a half car load of above cabinets, which I 
will sell at Special reductions. Call and 
see the Cabinet, and get prices. 



H. S. HOTTENSTP.IN, 
R. D. 2 ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



HERSHEY TRUST CO. 

HERSHEY, PENNA. 
Capital, Surplus and Profits $425,000.00 
Resources $3,500,000.00 
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 
M. S. Hershey, President 
W. H. Lebhicker, V. Pres. 
Ezra F. Hershey, V. Pres. 
S. C. Stechon, Treas. 
John A. Landis U. G. Risser, M.D. 

J. B. Leithiser John E. Snyder 

Wm. F. R. Murrie A. W. Stauffer 

Commercial Banking Department 
Saving Department Trust Department 

LARGEST CIRCULATION AND 
ADVERTISING PATRONAGE 

Elizabethtown Chronicle 

Fifty-one Years Old and Still Young 



Garrett, Milier & Co. 



Electrical 
Supplies 



N. E. Cor. Fourth & Orange Sts. 
WILMINGTON, -:- -:- DELAWARE 



80 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



jOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC 

Hertzler's Department Store 

N. E. CORNER CENTRE SQUARE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 




Always Ready to Supply Your Needs Satisfactorily in 
DRY GOODS, STAPLE AND FANCY NOTIONS, BEST GROCERIES, FRUITS, 
SWEETMEATS, SHOES, WINDOW SHADES, QUEENSWARE, MEN'S 
WOMEN'S, BOYS' AND GIRL'S CLOTHING, OIL CLOTH, LINO- 
LEUM, CARPETS, RUGS, ETC. 

Goods displayed on three floors and separate carpet store, three doors 
east of Post Office. 

Agents for made to measure clothing — International Tailoring Co. of New 
York. 

We carry full stocks notwithstanding the great difficulty in obtaining 
goods at these high prices. 

Long experience in merchandising goe with prices of goods purchased here. 

HERTZLER BROS. 

g 

O 

o 
ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo« 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOCX3000000CM5CX>OCX3000000COOOOOOOOOCXX5000eOOOOOOOOOOO 




What about the homeyon^ 
have promisedyourself 

build it NOW! 



See us for FREE building Kelps- 
working plans and cost estimates 



We Are Manufacturers of 

Doors and Window Frames, Doors and Sa%h, Mouldings, Dressers, Shutters and 

Blinds, Porch Work and Columns, Screens and Storm Sash, Hotbed 

Sash, Stair Work and Interior Finish 

And Dealers In 

Rough Lumber, Flooring and Ceiling, Fir Porch Flooring, Building Lime, Sand, 

Plaster, White Finish, Hydrated Lime, Brick, Cement, Asbestos, 

Asphalt, and Roll Roofing, Slate, Wall Board 

WE SPECIALIZE IN THE MANUFACTURE OF 

Shipping Cases and Tobacco Shooks 



We solicit your business and aim to give you prompt and satisfactory ser- 
vice on short notice. It is not necessary that we build for you in order to 
sell you the material; call to see us or 'phone when in the market for any- 
thing in our line and we shall be only too glad to give you our best service. 

Ask for our suggestions and we will cheerfully help you in planning your 
new buildings or remodeling your old ones. 

ELIZABETHTOWN PLANING MILL 



Bell Phone 3RS 
Independent 646A 



HOFFER BROS., Proprietors 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO GGGQGOQaOQOOOOOOOOQOGOOOOOQCOO 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Q 0OOOOCOO0OOOO0OOCK3OOOOOOOGQ© 

W. S. SMITH, President PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MaRTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

ELIZABETHTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL $100,000.00 

SURPLUS & PROFITS 144,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited Interest Paid On Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent 

DIRECTORS: 

W. S. Smith Elmer W. Strickler Peter N. Rutt 

F. W. Groff J. S. Risser B. L. Geyer 

§ E. C. Ginder Amos P. Coble E. E. Coble 

® OOQOOOOOQQOOOQOQOQOOOQQQQOQOQOOOOOOOOOQOOOQQOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOG » 
QOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOJ 

ELIZABETHTOWN EXCHANGE BANK 



Now Occupies Its New Bank Building 
Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 

Fays Interest on Time Deposits 

OFFICERS 

A. G. HEISEY, President ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier 
I. H. STAUFFER, Asst. Cashier C. A. COBLE, Teller 

DIRECTORS 

A. G. Heisey H E Landis B. H. Greider 

5 Allen A. Coble „ * r» M. K. Forney 

o TT t n- T. Geo. D. Boggs „, . „ r ., u 

o H. J. Gish W. A. Withers 

8 Jos. G. Heisey E - E> Hernl ey A. C. Fridy 

o oooo<x>ooooooooooooocx>ooooooocxxx>oooooooooooooooooooooooooooo ( 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



B ■ ■ 



iiiniiiiuiiiiiiii 



!!B!!i:!ai:l>!fl;i;i;R , '' l ;fS!IIIIB'l!!HIII!inil!llll!llBI!l!!Elll!!ll!:i!H!ll!BI!IIIBIII!!ll!IIIBII 



PLAIN 
CLOTHING 



WATT & SHAND 



Centre Square 



LANCASTER, PA. 



miiiifliinii 



IIIBII!liBII!l!BIIII!BIIIIIB!lll!BI[llll 



GEORGE S. DAUGHERTY GO. 

N. York--Chicago--Pittsburg 



Quality No. 10 fruits and vege- 
tables in No. 10 tins. 



DODGE BROTHERS MOTOR CARS 

R. H. FORNEY 

GARAGE AND REPAIR SHOP 

On North Market Street 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- -:- PENNA. 

CHAS. b. dierolf 

DRUGGI ST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



PATRONIZE 

OUR 

ADVERTISERS 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SINCE THE DAYS OF THE GOLDSMITHS 

The goldsmiths of olden times, with whom banking had its be- 
ginning, undertook only to safeguard money and valuables en- 
trusted to their care. 

Banks have increased their activities since that time until they 
have become an indipensable factor in the finance and commerce 
of all civilized nations. 

The modern business man and woman who make full use of 
their bank looks upon it as an institution dealing in business in- 
telligence as well as money and credit. 

We invite business men and women to make use of all our fa- 
cilities for service. 

The Farmers' National Bank 

LITITZ, PENNA. 

S. W. Buch. President J. H. Breitigan, Cashier. 



KEYSTONE NATIONAL BANK 

MANHEIM, PENNSYLVANIA 

CAPITAL $ 125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS 165,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 1,500,000 

FOUR PER CENT. INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS 
ACCOUNTS LARGE OR SMALL SOLICITED 

OFFICERS 
John B. Shenk, President 
H. M. Beamesderfer, Vice-President H. A. Merkey, Teller 

J. G. Graybill, Cashier Norman Weaver, Clerk 

Clair H. Keen, Asst. Cashier Anna ShoIIenberger, Clerk 



H. M. Beamesderfer 
John R. Cassel 
Morris B. Ginder 



DIRECTORS 
Jacob G. Hershey 
J. B. Shenk 



R. O. Diehl 
John B. Hossler 
W. W. Moyer 



OUR TRUST DEPARTMENT CAN SERVE YOU AS 

Executor, Administrator, Assignee, Receiver, Guardian 
Agent, Attorney in Fact, Registrar 
OF STOCKS AND BONDS, ETC. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Trimmer's Great 
Bargain Emporium 



McLaughlin Bros. 
DRAYMEN 



On the Square 


LOCAL, LONG DISTANCE HAULING 




26 Washington Street 




ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 


ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 


BELL PHONE 39-R2 

• 


Elizabethtown Roller Mills 


MARTIN 


Manufacturer and Dealer in 
FLOUR, CORN MEAL AND FEED 


READY-MADE AND MADE-TO-ORDER 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 




CLOTHING 


J. V. BINKLEY, Propr. 


FURNISHINGS AND SHOES 


402-404 South Market St. 




Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Pa. 


ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



IOQQQOQQOQQQOOQQOQQOQ&2QQQQQQOQGC&OOOQQQQOQQOOOQQOQQQQQQOOQQO} 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MOUNT JOY, PA. 



Thomas J. Brown 
Jacob S. Carmany 
H. H. Myers 
Abraham L. Nissley 



directors: 

Gabriel Moyer 
Jos. B. Hostetter 
B. S. Stauffer 
Jno. W. Newcomer 
Amos N. Musser 



H. Roy Nissley 
Jacob N. Hershey 
E. S. Gerberich 
Henry H. Eby 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus & Profits $150,000.00 

officers: 

THOMAS J. BROWN, President J. S. CARMANY, Vice President 

R. FELLENBAUM, Cashier 



4% Paid on Savings Accounts and Time Certificates. Resources $1,600,000 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SOUTH END GROCERY 

FRESH, FANCY AND STAPLE GROCER IES, CANDIES AND LUNCH GOODS 
"The little store with biff business" 



Levi C. Hershey 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



A. W. CAIN 

DRUGGIST 



Elizabethtown, Penna. 

THE BETTER REPAIRING OF THE 

BARNES SHOE SHOP 

WILL GRATIFY YOU 

It's Real Economy 

43 South Market St ELIZABETHTOWN 

NISSLEY'S LUNCH & DINING ROOMS 

David D. Clare, Proprietor 

14-16 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER. PENNA, 



LANCASTER SCHOOL SUPPLY CO. 

L. B. Herr & Son 
Booksellers 

Stationeries 

Printers 

46-48 W. King St. LANCASTER, PA. 

THE GROSS 
CONFECTIONERY 

122 S. Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



BARD-BLANKENMYER CO., Inc. 

plumbingTheating 

and SHEET METAL WORK 



118 South Queen Street, 



LANCASTER, PA. 



GUNSMITH 



LOCKSMITH 



DOMNITZ BROS. 

If it's a (LOCK) key, we have it 
222 1£ N. Q. St. LANCASTER, PA. 



A. C. McLANACHAN 
BARBER 

21 E. High St 

Second Door From Post Office 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



BUCH MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



WE BUILD THE FOLLOWING GOODS IN 

THE COLLEGE TOWN 



Wheelbarrows, Corn Shelters, Wood Saws, 
Land Rollers, Pulverizers, Water Troughs 



HENRY L. GISE 



Notary Public, Surveyor and Conveyancer 

Insurance of all Kinds 

Agent for 

State Capital Savings and Loan 

Association 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 

J. W. G. Hershey, Pres. 

J. Bitzer Johns, V. Pres. 

Henry R. Gibbel, Sec. & Treas. 



The Lititz Agricultural 

Mutual Fire 

Insurance Company 



Insures against Lightning, Storm and Fire 

Insurance in force $39,000,000 
Issues both Cash and Assessment Policies 



PHONOGRAPHS 

We handle only one make and that is the 

EDISON £?, v ai 

FISHER'S 

8 Centre Square 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



EBY SHOE COMPANY 

Incorporated 
Manufacturers of 

MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S 

FINE WELT AND TURNED 

SHOES 



13 EAST MAIN STREET 
LITITZ, PENNA. 



LITITZ, 



PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



HEATING and PLUMBING 



Miller Pipeless Furnaces 

and 
Leader Water Systems 



LEO KOB 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



J. W. ZMRFOSS 

GENERAL HARDWARE 

Sporting and Housefurnishing 
Goods 



ELIZABETHTOWN. -:- PENNA. 

POTTS DEPARTMENT STORE 
"EPHRATA'S BIGGEST BEST STORE" 

EBERLY BROTHERS 
SHOES COAL 

Main & State S. State St. 



Ephrata, Pa. 



The Ephrata Review 

$1.50 A YEAR 

Best Job Printing 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



Chas. S. Yeager, Propr. 



CHAS. K. MUSSER 



Electrical 

Contractor 

All Kinds of 

Electrical Supplies and Fixtures 

HOUSE WIRING A SPECIALTY 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



)OOOOOOOOCX}OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXXXXXX)0000000! 



BEE 
HIVE 




HIVE 



DEPARTMENT STORE 



OUR CREED 



We believe in the goods we are selling in our ab/-*^ 
to get results. We believe that honest goods can b» .-»■•. a 
to honest people by honest methods. We believe in wc* 
ing, not wasting; in laughing, no J > crying; in boosting, 
not knocking; and in the pleasure of doing business. We 
believe that a man gets what he goes after; that a cus- 
tomer today is worth two customers tomorrow; and that 
no man is down and out until he has lost faith in himself. 
We believe in courtesy, in kindness, in generosity, in good 
cheer, in friendship, and in honest competition. We be- 
lieve in increasing our business, and that the way to do 
it is to reach for it. 



O 



WE ARE REACHING FOR YOURS 



A. A. ABELE 



ELIZABETHTOWN. 

)O000O00O0(XX)0000000O0OO0O<X3OOOOO00OOOOO0OOO0O000O00000000000^ 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



A Dream of Summer 

Bland as the morning' breath of 
June 
The southwest breezes play; 
And, through its haze, the winter 
noon 
Seems warm as summer's day. 
The snow-plumed Angel of the 
North 
Has dropped his icy spear; 
Again the mossy earth looks forth 
Again the streams gush clear. 

The fox his hillside cell forsakes, 

The muskrat leaves his nook, 
The bluebrid in the meadow brakes 

Is singing with the brook. 
"Bear up. O Mother Nature!" cry 

Bird, breeze, and streamlet free ; 
"Our winter voices prophesy 

Of summer clays to thee !" 

So, in those winters of the soul, 

By bitter blasts and drear 
O'erswept from Memory's frozen 
pole 

Will suppy days appear. 
Reviving Hope and Faith, they 
show, 

The soul its living powers. 
And how beneath the winter's snow 

Lie germs of summer flowers ! 

The Night is mother of the Day, 

The Winter of the Spring, 
And ever upon old Decay 

The greenest mosses cling. 
Behind the cloud the starlight lurks, 

Through showers the sunbeams 
fall ; 
For God who loveth all His works, 

Has kept His Hope with all! 

— John Greenleaf Whittier. 



©©0©OOQOO©©OOOOOGOOO©0©©CKX>©C*5.X>©<X>^^ 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



£6itorial8 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Jacob S. Harley 

Associate Editor Florence T. Moyer 

Departmental Editor H. H. Nye 

Alumni Editor L. W. Leiter 

Religious News Editor Ezra M. Wenger 

( Emma Ziegler 

School News ] 

( Stanley. Ober 

Circulation Manager J. Z. Herr 

Business Manager E. G. Meyer 

Our College Times is published monthly during the Academic year of Elizabeth- 
town College. 

This paper will have to be discontinued as soon as the time of Subscription expires 
as an action of the United States legislature. 

Please renew in time and report any change of address to the business manager. 

Subscription rates one dollar per year; fifteen cents per copy; six subscription* 
$5.00 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



Every One Bring One 

To every one that contemplates 
enrolling as a student at Elizabeth- 
town College September next: We 
shall welcome you and strive 
throughout the school year to help 
you make it the richest year of your 
life in experience and in the 
awakening of the latent powers and 
possibilities of your soul. May we 
not suggest a very practical way in 
which to make this vacation time 
a memorable one to you. It is sim- 
ply this. Endeavor to secure be- 
tween now and the date school 
opens, if possible, one new student 
to come with you and enroll for the 
year. Begin now to look about you 



for such persons as might be bene- 
fited by a course of study and train- 
ing at Elizabethtown College. In- 
terview them earnestly and prayer- 
fully, and make them feel that it 
is an unselfish purpose you have in 
soliciting them as students for this 
school. Tell them of your own 
hopes and aims, of the great op- 
portunities in the great wide world, 
of the fields which are ripe to the 
harvest. Impress upon them that 
the increased earning power afford- 
ed by an education is but an inci- 
dental advantage — tfcat the worth- 
while stupendous meaning of a col- 
lege course is the culture and re- 
finement it brings to the heart, the 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



personality it develops in the en- 
thusiastic boy or girl, the practice 
and efficiency it contributes to ev- 
ery mental faculty, making it like a 
sharp steel blade, and the outlook 
it affords upon a universe full of 
wonder and grandeur which fills 
the impressionable mind with en- 
nobling ideas of the Creator and 
His intimate relationship with hu- 
manity. Just try to keep in mind 
all summer the motto, "Every-one 
bring one;" you will probably not 
fail if you pursue such a policy per- 
sistently ; but even should you fail 
you will have enjoyed pleading for 
a good cause and you will have 
pleasant memories of your vaca- 
tion ; while if you succeed you will 
have a special interest all year in 
that person whom you can look 
upon as being here through your 
influence. You will be eager that 
he do well in his studies. You will 
have a sense of responsibility which 
will be healthful f6r you. You will 
feel that the world has an added 
worker through you. Eternity alone 
can tell the result of service for the 
Master which may directly and in- 
directly be ascribed to your disin- 
terested efforts. We want a large 
enrollment and an excellent spirit 
on College Hill next year. You will 
help to bring that about. An edu- 
cational forward movement in the 
better sense of the phrase is what 
we all hope to realize. It is already 
launched and we all want to help 
]1 on. In many a backwoods dis- 
trict, in many an obscure home 
there is a boy or girl who has not 
yet heard the clarion call to a 
larger life of usefulness and conse- 
quent happiness. The new recruits 



who swell the army of world leaders 
are the hope of the future. How 
shall they be enlisted? How many 
shall rally on College Hill on the 
opening day of 1921-22? The 
larger the number organized for 
one great cause the greater the 
benefit and inspiration coming to 
each individual, and the greater 
the total achievement for righteous- 
ness and the glory of God. 



There are gains for our losses, 
There are balms for our pains, 
But when youth, the dream, departs 
It takes something from our 

hearts 
And it never comes again. 



I would not enter on my list of 
friends, 
(Though graced with polished 
manners and fine sense, 
Yet wanting sensibility) the man 
Who needlessly sets foot upon a 
worm. 

Cowper. 



Superfluous 



"I understand," he said, "that 
they have a curfew law out here 
now." 

"No," answered his informant. 
"They did have one, but they gave 
it up." 

"What was the trouble?" 

"Well, the bell rang at nine 
o'clock and almost every one in the 
neighborhood complained that it 
woke him up." 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



New Members of Faculty, 1921-22. 

We are glad to announce the re- 
turn of Miss Sara C. Shisler to our 
teaching staff. She is a graduate of 
Manchester College and has been 
a student in Columbia University. 
Because of her personality and un- 
usual intellectual ability, Miss Shis- 
ler is sure to render valuable ser- 
vice in our faculty the coming school 
year. . 

Miss Ethel A. Roop is a graduate 
of Western Maryland College and 
has pursued studies at Johns Hop- 
kins University and Bethany Bible 
School. Her success as a high 
school teacher in Maryland gives 
assurance that her work here as 
teacher of history and French will 
be entirely satisfactory. 

The Commercial Department will 
be materially strengthened next 
year by the addition to its teaching 
force of Edwin L. Manthey, who 
holds the degree Bachelor of Philo- 
sophy, conferred by Akron Univer- 
sity. He has had valuable experi- 
ence as a member of several busi- 
ness corporations in the state of 
Ohio. Mr. Manthey will fill the 
chair of Industries, Finance and Po- 
litical Science. 

Mr. Ephraim G. Meyer, a gradu- 
ate of Elizabethtown College and 
formerly a student both in Colum- 
bia University and in the Pedagogi- 
cal Music School of Chicago, will 
have full charge of the vocal music 
department. Mr. Meyer is an ac- 
complished singer and a successful 
teacher in his chosen field. We do 
not hesitate to entrust to him this 
important branch of instruction at 
Elizabethtown. 



F. J Byer, former president of 
Hebron Seminary, will begin his 
work as teacher of expression here 
in September. He has served in 
this capacity at Bethany Bible 
School and at Ignatius College He 
holds diplomas from Mount Morris 
College, Bethany Bible School and 
Columbia College of Expression. 

Mrs. Lillian Falkenstein Wil- 
loughby will teach classes in Span- 
ish and French and Miss Nettie 
Maupin will assist in the depart- 
ment of Mathematics. Both of these 
ladies are worthy and capable and 
will make their influence felt 
among the students. 

Jacob H. Gingrich comes to serve 
the College as Field Director, and 
he will also give some religious in- 
struction. He is a graduate of Man- 
chester College and received the 
Master's Degree at the University 
of Chicago in 1920. 

With a few exceptions the mem- 
bers of last year's faculty continue 
and with the above additions we 
shall have a stronger body of in- 
structors than ever. Christian ideals 
are ever held in view in selecting 
and organizing the corps of teach- 
ers. With the help of the Master 
we intend to move forward along all 
lines the coming year, strong in the 
hope that we can show to the world 
the efficiency of Christian Educa- 
tion. 



Be not disturbed at trifles. 



My strength is as the strength of ten 
Because my heart is pure. 

Tennyson. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 




Chapsl Services — Spring Term 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



History of the Franklin Keystone 
Literary Society 

The school year 1920 marks the 
birth of a new Literary Society on 
College Hill by the name of "Frank- 
lin." This name was given by the 
advisory committee of the societies, 
in honor of Benjamin Franklin, who 
did so much for the state of Penn- 
sylvania. Franklin is dead, yet he 
liveth in our society. We who are 
members are especially glad we be- 
long to the society named after the 
honored Franklin. 

The society chose for its motto, 
"Upward and Onward" and after 
you have read the following yearly 
report of our society, you will be 
convinced that we have lived up to 
our motto. 

The first meeting held by the 
Franklin society was held on the 
evening of Oct. 20, 1920. 

The following members have 
served as president and secretary: 
Presidents: Mr. Daniel Meyers, Mr. 
Jesse Reber, Mr. Rudolph Ziegler, 
Mr. Roy Miller, Mr. Charles Young, 
Mr. Amos Meyer. Secretaries: Miss 
Grace Ober, Miss Ada Zug, Miss 
Mary Hykes, Miss Esther Bair, Miss 
Leah Whistler, Miss Hannah Sher- 
man. 

To these members who have per- 
formed their duties so well and 
with the hearty co-operation of the 
society as a whole, together with 
Miss Elizabeth Meyer and Prof. L. 
W. Leiter our faculty advisors we 
attribute the success of the Frank- 
lin Society. 

Our society started with an en- 
rollment of thirty-seven members 
and by the close of the winter term 



there were twenty-nine added to it, 
making a total of sixty-six. For 
this growth in number we are in- 
deed grateful, and we are also very 
grateful for the growth in interest, 
enthusiasm, and quality of work 
done by our members. 

The following are a few of the 
questions debated by the respective 
debaters. 

Resolved that education is more 
beneficial to mankind than money. 
Debated affirmatively — Mr. Henry 
Bucher, Miss Anna Enterline. Nega- 
tively — Mr. Oral Hollopeter, Miss 
Velma Fike. 

The judges decided in favor of 
the affirmative side. 

Resolved that the negroes were 
more cruelly treated at the hands 
of the white men than the Indians. 
Debated Affirmatively — Mr. Roy 
Brandt, Mr. Oral Hollopeter, Mr. 
Ammon Gettel. Negatively — Mr. 
Harvey Hess, Mr. Amos Meyer, Mr. 
Leroy Wolgemuth. The judges de- 
cided in' favor of the affirmative 
side. 

Resolved that nature is more 
beautiful than art. Debated Af- 
firmatively — Mr. Charles Young, 
Miss Blanche Hege. Negatively — 
Miss Mable Bomberger, Mr. David 
Ebling. The judges decided in fa- 
vor of affirmative side. 

A number of programs of a very 
high standard were rendered dur- 
ing the year. Among them was the 
Hiawatha Program rendered on the 
evening of May 14, 1921. The 
various features of this program set 
forth the life and principal char- 
acteristics of Hiawatha. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



The evening of May 20, 1921 
dates an important epoch in the his- 
tory of the Franklin society. The 
inter-society debate held between 
the Franklin and Penn societies re- 
sulted in favor of the Franklin. The 
following were the debaters for our 
society: Daniel Meyers, (Captain) 
Jesse Reber, Clarence Holsopple, 
Rudolph Zeigler, alternate. The 
question for debate was: Resolved, 
that the United States should enter 
the League of Nations. This vital 
question was discussed pro and con 
by the sister societies. 

Each Franklin is and ever shall 
be true to the colors of right — 
Brown and White. 



"A Backward Look 
of Penn Society 

Since the founding of Penn 
Literary Society on Oct. 20, 1920, 
the members of the society have 
rendered fifteen programs consist- 
ing of music, vocal and instrument- 
al, recitations, readings, stories, de- 
bates, symposiums, soliloquies, book 
reviews, impromptu speeches, dia- 
logues, pantomimes, pianologues 
and discussions on various subjects. 
We also had parliamentary drill at 
a number of meetings. 

As we look back on the programs 
which have been given there are 
some whole programs or parts only 
which we remember more distinct- 
ly than others and which we will 
not forget after we leave school. 
Some special programs given were 
the demonstration of a Daily Vaca- 
tion Bible School, a Life Vocation 



Program, Penn Program, Washing- 
ton and Lincoln Program, and a 
Spring Program. 

At one of our meetings there was 
given a pantomime in which our so- 
ciety song "The green and Gold" 
was first sung in public. The 
youngest member of our society 
Floy Schlosser dressed in green and 
gold represented the Penn Society. 
One of our boys John Bechtel was 
William Penn, who came back in 
our time. He seemed very much 
bewildered at first sight of Penn So- 
ciety, and could not understand 
why she was there. She tried to 
explain by pointing to the banner 
on which are our motto and name. 
But he could not fully understand 
until the song was sung by our Penn 
Girl's Chorus. Gradually he seemed 
to understand and a pleased ex- 
pression came into his face. Before 
leaving the stage he made an old- 
fashioned bow to her, and she made 
a quaint little courtesy to him, thus 
forming the tie between William 
Penn and Penn Society. 

Some of the good numbers on the 
program were the inaugural ad- 
dresses given by our different presi- 
dents as they took office. Each one 
was appropriate for the time in 
which it was given. The addresses 
given at the beginning of our so- 
ciety spoke of what the society 
should aim to do, and how we need 
to work together to accomplish 
things. As the society grew a few 
months old they could see where we 
had improved, and also where we 
still needed to do so. At a recent 
meeting when our last president for 
this year gave his address, he gave 
to us his mental picture of Penn 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Society of the future, and as he 
closed his address, he called on all 
the members of the society to co- 
operate with each other so we may 
close our society work for the year 
with snap and be ready to begin it 
again at the opening of school in 
the fall, with renewed interest. 

"Penn Society ever, gladly thy 

praise we sing, 
Founded in nineteen-twenty, live on 

while time doth wing. 
Loyal friends love the forever, and 

in our hearts we'll hold 
Pleasantest memories always of 

Penn and the Green and 

Gold." 



The Penn Society bears honora- 
ble recognition not only in the cir- 
cle of the Penn Society, but in Inter- 
society work. In the Junior Orator- 
ical contest four of the five contes- 
tants were members of the Penn So- 
ciety. The two highest prizes were 
won respectively by Edward Zig- 
ler, first prize, and Oliver Zendt, 
second prize. The Penn Society 
feels justly appreciative that two 
decisions out of three were in favor 
of her contestants. Although the 
Franklin Society won in the Inter- 
Society debate, the Penn debaters 
namely Edward Ziegler (captain), 
John Bechtel, Foster Bittinger, Oli- 
ver Zendt, (alternate), put up a 
good fight which was evidenced by 
the fact that the decision of the 
judges was not unanimous. Striv- 
ing toward the motto "Labor Con- 
quers All Things" failure is not 
shown by a lost debate. 



HOMERIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

At the opening of this year there 
was but one literary society on the 
Hill. As the student body was too 
large for all to take an active part 
in one society, the Faculty appoint- 
ed a committee on Literary Socie- 
ties. This committee consisted of 
H. H. Nye, I. S. Hoffer, Elizabeth 
Myer and J. I. Baugher. This com- 
mittee decided that three societies 
should be organized, one for the 
College students, and two for the 
academy students. The Homerian 
Society includes all students of Eliz- 
abethtown College who are at pres- 
ent taking or have taken work of 
College rank. 

The Homerian Literary Society 
was organized for the first time in 
January, 1911. Since then it has 
been active in literary work until 
1918, when it was discontinued. 
The reorganization of the Homerian 
Literary Society and the organiza- 
tion of the Penn and Tranklin So- 
cieties is an epoch marking event 
in the history of Elizabethtown Col- 
lege. At present all three societies 
are thriving and efficient literary 
work is being done. The member- 
ship of the Homerian Society is 
fourty-four, most of whom are tak- 
ing an active part in the work of the 
Society. 

The success of the Society is due 
in a large measure to its enthusias- 
tic and energetic presidents. The 
first president of our Society was 
E. G. Meyer, the first secretary Em- 
ma Ziegler. All take an active in- 
terest in the Society and especially 
in the public meetings held every 
three weeks. Special programs 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



which are interesting as well as in- 
structive, are rendered at these 
times. We, Homerains, are proud, 
and justly so, of our society. 

Two public programs, which we 
think are worthy of special notice, 
have been rendered. One consisted 
of a short play in two acts, "A Day 
Spent in an Indian Village." B. 
Mary Royer took the part of an 
English speaking Bible Lady. She 
was assisted by several members of 
the society. The first act was a visit 
to an Indian school. The scene of 
the second act was around the door- 
way of a hut in the village. The 
Bible Lady surrounded by a circle 
of Indian mothers and children was 
telling them Bible stories. The char- 
acters were dressed in native Indian 
dress. The other special program 
was an Art program. Fifty art 
slides were secured for this pro- 
gram from the Educational Bureau 
at Harrisburg. 

It is our wish that the Homerian 
Society will continue its work and 
may it ever be a more fitting mem- 
orial of the man in whose honor it 
was founded. J. O. 



Inconstancy of Man 

Sigh no more ladies, sigh no more, 
Men were deceivers ever; 

One foot in sea and one on shore ; 
To one thing constant never. 

Shakespeare. 

Inconstancy of Woman 

There are three things a wise man, 

will not trust; 
The wind, the sunshine of an April 

day, 
And woman's plighted faith. 

Southey. 



OUTING 

Donegal Springs was the Mecca 
of the students on the Saturday af- 
ternoon of May 21. This historic 
spot attracts many visitors. Not 
only is it noted for the wonderful 
springs, but for the old historic 
church. This church was founded 
in 1722, the first building having 
been of logs. It was remodeled in 
1831 and again in 1851. This 
church has contributed an unusual 
number of men to the various wars 
of the United State§. The names 
of these men are engraved on a 
monument placed in the church 
yard. The grave yard is also a place 
of great interest. Many of the 
graves date back as far as 1770. 
Adjoining the church grounds is the 
beautiful home of the late Senator 
Cameron. The students after ex- 
ploring all the grounds and places 
of interest, ate a lunch to which 
they could do justice, and then 
slowly wended their way back to 
College Hill. 

May 17 was an eventful day for 
Juniors and Seniors. Both classes 
had their spring outings on this day, 
the Seniors going to Conewago and 
the Juniors to Beverly. They were 
especially enjoyable occasions since 
because of weather conditions the 
outings had been postponed several 
times previously. They all came 
back tired but having enjoyed their 
holiday. 



A Maying 

"Life went a Maying 
With nature, Hope and Poesy, 
When I was young! 

Coleridge. 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Commencement Week 

An evening of music by the 
piano and voice students on the 
evening of Saturday, June 4th, 
opened the events of Commence- 
ment Week at the College. On this 
occasion as was the case generally 
throughout the week the Chapel 
was filled with an appreciative 
audience of students and visitors. 
On the following evening, the date 
of the baccalaureate sermon, Pro- 
fessor J. G. Meyer, the president- 
elect, deliverebl to the senior class 
in the presence of a large audience 
a strong dignified appeal on the 
"Investment of Talent." The 
graduating seniors of the School 
of Finance and Commerce had 
charge of a program of exercises 
on Monday evening, June 6th. An 
attentive audience listened to the 
orations and music, and enjoyed 
the pleasing decorations of the 
room. One of the closing numbers 
of the program was the "Breaking 
of the Wreath." 

A special feature of the week 
was the ceremony of dedicating the 
new apartment building on Tues- 
day morning, June 7th. These ex- 
ercises were in charge of the 
trustees, Elder S. H. Hertzler, pres- 
ident of the board, presiding. Af- 
ter a few brief talks by various 
members of the board on the past, 
present and future of the College, 
Elder Ezra Flory of Elgin, Illinois 
delivered an address appropriate 
to the occasion. The chairman an- 
nounced the name of the new build- 
ing. "Fairview Apartments." 

The senior class gave the annual 
class program on the afternoon of 



June 7th. The stage had the set- 
ting of a meeting room for an or- 
ganization of teachers where were 
discussed problems of educational 
interest. During the exercises the 
scene changed to the interior of a 
railway coach, where two members 
of the class, incidentally meeting 
years after graduation discussed 
the various fortunes of their class- 
mates. The program was unique, 
thoroughly instructive, interesting, 
and elevating. 

The annual alumni banquet, held 
at 4 p. m. June 7th, was attended 
by an unusually large number of 
the graduates of former years. At 
the public alumni meeting held a 
few hours later Mrs. Mary Her- 
shey Crouthamel gave a recitation 
with a characteristic naieve man- 
ner and with such power of ex- 
pression as to hold her audience in 
closest attention. Professor Schlos- 
ser gave, an address on Christian 
education. He spoke with his ac- 
customed spontaneity and energy 
during the hour that he had the 
floor. 

The College held its Commence- 
ment exercises proper in the Chapel 
Wednesday, June 8th at 9 a. m. 
Four of the graduates delivered 
orations to their assembled fellow- 
students, friends and teachers, af- 
ter which the audience listened to 
a forceful, address to the senior 
class on "Pay your Debts" by Pro- 
fessor Otho Winger, President of 
Manchester College. Delightful 
music was interspersed between 
the literary members. The presenta- 
tion of the diplomas closed the ex- 
ercises and the school work for the 
vear 1920-21. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 




Professor Wenger's Bible Class 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Alumni Notes 



The Alumni Association held a 
most pleasant meeting on Tuesday, 
June seventh. 

The luncheon was served at 5 :00 
p. m. in the College Dining Hall. 
The Dining Hall although enlarged 
last fall was crowded. The tables 
were tastily arranged; the menu 
was most pleasing and the fellow- 
ship was splendid. Mr. Ephraim 
Hertzler served as Toastmaster at 
the close of the luncheon. A large 
number responded with toasts that 
were expressive of the good will 
and fellowship of the meeting. 

Immediately after the luncheon 
the association adjourned to meet 
in business session in the old So- 
ciety Hall, now known as class- 
room E. The Graduating Class of 
1921 all applied for membership. 
They were unanimously elected as 
active members of the association. 

The officers for next year were 
elected and all committees were ap- 
pointed. The association decided 
to have the constitution revised and 
to have copies of same printed. A 
committee was appointed to carry 
out the work of revision who shall 
report next year. 

A committee of three members 
was appointed to present ideas and 
plans for an alumni memorial build- 
ing in which to invest the funds sub- 
scribed in the record campaign and 
all other funds now being solicited 
by the various classes. 



The evening program was a good 
success and altogether in keeping 
with the spirit of the day which b( 
gan in the morning with the Dedi- 
catory Services for the Fairviei 
apartments. 

We were very much disappointe< 
that Mr. George Capetanios was not 
able to be with us to give the main 
address of the evening. Prof. R. W. 
Schlosser substituted in a most ad- 
mirable manner. 

The president's opening address 
was a very appropriate one on types 
of education, especially emphasiz- 
ing Christian education as the only 
enduring type. 

Prof. Schlosser's address con- 
tinued this line of thought setting 
forth the abiding qualities of Chris- 
tian Education. The audience soon 
forgot the disappointment in not 
being able to hear Rev. Capetanios 
and became absorbed in the vital 
message presented by Prof. Schlos- 
ser. 

Mrs. Mary Hershey Crouthamel 
recited a beautiful selection. She 
held her audience in tense silence 
throughout. The pleasure of the 
audience was most apparent. 

If you were not present you have 
splendid reasons for deep regret. 
We are sorry you could not be 
present. You missed one of the 
finest alumni meetings ever held on 
College Hill. Why should it not 
be? We have successfully closed 
a most important event in the his- 
tory of the College, namely, the 
campaign for $400,000, — . Then 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



too we are in the very act of making 
Elizabethtown College a fully 
standardized College. Further an- 
other new building was added to 
the group of buildings, a very sub- 
stantial and pretty building. The 
enrollment of the College for the 
first time passed the Two Hundred 
and Fifty mark. Our goal now is 
changed. Five Hundred Students 
for Elizabethtown College; Two 
Hundred of which are full College 
Students is now the goal for our 
Alma Mater. Is there not every 
reason why this year's meeting 
should have been such a splendid 
one? 

Fellow-alumni! What will you do 
this year to help YOUR ALMA 
MATER realize her new goal? 

JULY 21 is Elizabethtown COL- 
LEGE DAY. Will you use every op- 
portunity for assisting your Alma 
Mater but especially emphasize 
your support on this day. 

Our Slogans: 

EVERY ALUMNUS working EV- 
ERY DAY for Elizabethtown Col- 
lege. 

EVERY ALUMNUS ONE NEW 

STUDENT for Elizabethtown Col- 
lege for 1921-22. 

A contribution from one of our 
friends on May 11th by mail was 
much appreciated because of the 
spirit in which the donation to the 
College was made. On a slip' en- 
closed was a scripture reference 
for our thought, namely, I Tim. 
Chapter 4. 



The Newville Sunday School 

The interest in the Newville Sun- 
day School is still growing, especial- 
ly among the children and young 
people. These young people are 
always eager o do their part in the 
Sunday School work. They never 
tire in the work when there is a 
program to be given. Each child 
wants to take an active part in it. 

Mr. Mr. Stanley Ober is the 
Superintendent of the Sunday 
School. He is a very active worker 
and creates much interest in the 
work among the teachers and pupils 
The teachers, viz., Prof. Harley, 
Enos Weaver, Margaret Oellig, 
Ruby Oellig, Ilda Bittinger, and 
Minerva Reber, all enjoy this Sun- 
day afternoon work. We know the 
work is helpful to ourselves, and we 
hope that we can be of some service 
to those in the Sunday School. Mr. 
Weaver taught school at this place 
during the winter, and he has done 
much to increase the interest of Sun- 
day School work among his pupils. 

A very interesting program was 
rendered at this place on Thursday 
night before Easter. The first part 
of the program consisted of songs 
and recitations by the members of 
the Sunday School while the last 
part consisted of three talks given 
by members of the Volunteer Band 
from he College. Another program 
will be rendered on Sunday evening 
May 15. 

We hope that this Sunday School 
will continue to grow, and that the 
pupils will some day be worthy 
servants in the work that God has 
planned for them to do. 

I. M. B. 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Religious Notes 



Witnessing for Christ. 

The Master's charge, "Ye shall 
be my witness," expresses His con- 
fidence in the apostles and has a 
broad and trustful meaning; it 
means "my witnesses" here where 
you are known, and in neighboring 
lands, and then everywhere unto 
the uttermost parts of the earth. 
Observe the phrase "my witnesses" 
not merely witnesses unto me but 
witnesses chosen by me to take my 
place, to represent me when I am 
not there in person. The trust and 
confidence of our Lord is wonderful. 
He left no building, no writing, no 
material relics worthy of mention. 
He even borrowed a room in a 
friend's house for His last Supper 
and for the meeting of His little 
company." He gave His successors 
merely hints and beginnings to com- 
bine and develop and to give form 
and substance." This great com- 
mission was finally impressed upon 
the apostles. He did not limit their 
duty to be ministers of His Word, 
and preach sacraments of the Gos- 
pel, or to be pastors of men and 
bring men to God. He had revealed 
this in many ways and set it forth 
in definite outlines. But the domi- 
nant thought is that every follower 
of His above all things else, both 
in the laity and in the ministry is 
to bear witness to Christ, His Per- 
son, His Love, His Presence. With 
this charge ringing >in the Apostles' 
ears they set out to begin their work 
"We cannot doubt that it is to be 
the perpetually recurring keynote 
to which the whole music of the 



church is to be attuned to the end." 
The duty of being witnesses to 
Christ is laid upon all. Although in 
a special degree the commission 
may be held as addressed to the 
apostles and to those who bear of- 
fice in the church yet the humblest 
members are not excluded from its 
scope. 

It is the privilege of each believer 
everywhere in addition to the 
cleansing in the water of baptism 
to receive also such a baptism of the 
Holy Spirit which will endue and 
equip for service, or give power 
which will qualify to witness. "Ye 
shall receive power when the Holy 
Spirit is come upon you, and ye 
shall be my witnesses." The form 
in which this power shall manifest 
itself is not for us to decide. We 
must be led by the Spirit and allow 
God to choose our work and then 
the power will exactly fit the task 
that is before us. There are diver- 
isties of tasks and diversities of 
gifts but the one Spirit and the one 
Savior whom we represent in what- 
ever work and place God has put 
him. 

The life of witnessing is not one 
of ease and self-gratification, still 
less of emotionalism but of con- 
stant modest earnestness among the 
commonplace work of the world. 
To witness truly we must "be doers 
of the word and not hearers only;" 
we must live bright and shining 
lives, we must be vailant for the 
truth and fight bravely with sin, we 
must strengthen the feeble, an,d en- 
courage fainting hearts. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



As stated before, the subject then 
of our witness must be the Lord Jes- 
us. He sends His followers out into 
the world on a purpose as their 
work of works to bear a testimony. 
And that testimony is to be borne, 
first and last, to Himself. Our need 
will be met by telling the Story and 
living the Christ Life, as only those 
who personally know Him, can tell 
and live. 

It is only thru the Holy Spirit 
that we can witness. Without it 
our witness is bound to be a failure 
and disappointment. Let none of 
us be content with less of the spir- 
itual experience than God would 
give us. As long as we keep our 
witness within our own bounds, we 
shall accomplish little, but when we 
abandon self and rely entirely on 
the Holy Spirit we will attempt 
great things for God and our suc- 
cess will exceed our highest hopes. 

C. H. R. 



RELIGIOUS NOTES. 

Through the activities of the 
Volunteer Band many high water 
marks in Christian experience have 
been realized. 

One of these was a result of a 
drive that was put on for the Ex- 
periment Farm in India. For some 
time the Band had been planning 
and praying for the drive which was 
launched after the Chapel services 
on the morning of May the third. 
We were very fortunate in having 
B. Mary Royer (a returned Mission- 
ary from India) in our Student 
body to explain the need and the 
value any sacrifice on our part 



might mean to our less forturato 
brothers across the sea. Several 
« ther volunteers gave short inspira- 
tional messages. The drive was 
launched, our quota reached, and 
surpassed. Our teachers and stu- 
dents raised $1,250. 

The band has also been giving 
programs among the various chur- 
ches of the District within the past 
few weeks. Messrs. Royer, Ziegler, 
Weaver and Forney and Misses 
Bittinger and Hershey visited the 
Churches at Heidelburg, Richland 
and Myerstown. Recently a Depu- 
tation team consisting of Messrs 
Royer and Reber and Misses Nies 
and TTershey rendered several pro- 
grams in the Church at Shippens- 
burg. L. H. 



While the chapel was undergo- 
ing repairs, the students met each 
morning under the blue skies for 
chapel experience. To be out among 
nature with green grass for carpet, 
blue skies for a roof and the trees 
for walls inspires in us a greater 
feeling of reverence. Mid-week 
prayer meeting was also conducted 
on the terrace in front of Alpha 
Hall. On Sunday morning strains 
of music floated to us from the 
lower part of the campus. Upon 
investigation we found it was a 
group having a consecration ser- 
vice. 



He that can have patience can 
have what he will. 

Well done is better than well 
said. 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Departmental 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 

The Chorus Class very successful- 
ly rendered the Cantata, "Saul," in 
Market House Hall on Saturday 
night, April the thirtieth. For two 
hours a large and enthusiastic audi- 
ence gave their undivided attention 
while the story of Saul, in his rela- 
tion to David and to the Israelites, 
was given in solo and chorus. 

John Bechtel Jr., as Saul, was 
very expressive in his moods of an- 
ger, hatred, jealousy, despair and 
humility. 

Paul Zug made a grave and fitt- 
ing Samuel. 

Chester Royer as David, never 
failed to recognize the fact that 
Saul was King, even tho the king 
kept on his trail and tried to des- 
troy him. 

Ephraim Meyer as Jonathan 
showed his loyalty and friendship 
to David throughout the Cantata. 
The scene of the avowal of friend- 
ship between the two was very im- 
pressive. 

Emma Ziegler in her modest 
manner as Michal, alweys appear- 
red on the scenes in time to prevent 
a catastrophe, in which scenes she 
showed her love and anxiety for Da- 
vid. The Farewell Trio between 
David, Jonathan and Michal was 
especially touching. 

Lottie Nies, Hattie Eberly and 
Elizabeth Ziegler brought out the 
events in The Witches' Scene in a 
vivid and striking manner, especial- 
ly in their conversation with Saul 
and in the calling up of Samuel. 



We are planning to give the Can- 
tata at Annual Conference in the 
Hillside Auditorium either Saturday 
or Monday night of Conference 
week. 



The Practice of English in All 
Departments. 

Unless the English teacher coop- 
erates with the instructors in other 
departments of college or high 
school, an opportunity is lost. The 
errors students make in English 
when writing papers for history 
class should be known to the Eng- 
lish teacher that he may better 
know where to lay the stress in his 
class room drill. The student may 
know how to use good English but 
may habitually neglect to do so, 
except when he is specially watch- 
ed. The English teacher may know 
this fact in a degree at least if he 
keeps in touch with the teachers of 
other departments. The formation 
of correct habits in English in spite 
of all counter influences exerted 
over the student wherever he goe? 
constitutes the problem of the Eng- 
lish teacher. It is not an easy prob 
lem. 



Memorable George 

Mary — "Mama, George Wash- 
ington must have had an awful 
good memory, didn't he?" 
Mother — "Why, my dear?" 
Mary — Because everywhere I go 
I see monuments erected to his 
memory." 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



Athletics 



With the closing of the Spring 
Teim approaching, all our depart- 
ments of Athletics are climaxing 
their season in wonderful form. 

In base ball, a series of five inter- 
class games were arranged. These 
games were witnessed by all the 
loyal rooters of the Junior and Sen- 
ior Classes. The following is the 
lineup : 

Juniors—Eshleman, Edris, Brandt 
Myers, Longenecker, A. Meyer, 
Holsopple, Gingrich, Reber. 

Seniors — Raffensperger, Zendt, 
Moyer, Ober, Weaver, N. Meyer, 
Sherman, E. Meyer, Ziegler. 

The heavy hitting and the flashy 
field work enabled the Seniors to 
emerge victorious in three games 
out of the four played. 

The base ball spirit has gotten 
into the girls also. They had a 
short but intensely interesting 
game a few evenings ago. Keep it 
up girls; we covet the best for you. 

At E'town all have an equal 
chance for development along all 
lines of activity. Those who do not 
play base ball or engage in the 
track activities play tennis. A tour- 
nament was arranged and proved 
to be very interesting and helpful to 
all who joined it. We all believe 
in "developing head, heart and 
hand," don't you? . S. O. 



"TRACK/ 

"Track at E'town College is still 
young. We got started on several 
things this Spring. But what we 
still need is school spirit. That is 



beginning to show on the surface 
now. 

The several things we have 
started are: The pole vault; run- 
ning broad jump; standing broad 
jump; running and standing high 
jumps; the hundred yard dash; re- 
lay race on different distances; and 
the cross country race. That is 
about the extent of our activities 
for this year, but you must take the 
fact into consideration that this is 
the first year for track at E'town. 
As a whole the track teams are do- 
ing well considering the circumstan- 
ces under which they must work. 
Next year we hope to put out track 
teams that will know no limit. And 
we'll do it too, with the aid and co- 
operation of the "fellows." 
Yours for "Track," 

P. B. Brandt, Manager. 



Successful 

"Were you trying to catch that 
train, sir?" he asked pompously. 

The panting would be passenger 
eyed him balefully before he hissed 
in reply: Oh, no, I merely wanted 
to chase it out of the station. 

The Arklight. 



When all our hopes are gone 
'Tis well our hands must still keep 
toiling on 
For others sake; 
For strength to bear is found in duty 
done, 
And he is blest indeed who learns 
to make 
The joy of others cure his own heart 
ache. 



26 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



School Notes 



We are all glad to see Prof. 
Meyer out again after his illness 
and we hope for his full recovery 
soon. 



Mr. Gibble, superintendent of 
ground was busily directing the 
grading of the grounds about the 
new apartment building, sowing of 
grass seed and the making of walks 
and drives, preparatory to the dedi- 
cation of the building. The dedica- 
tion exercises, June 7th were im- 
pressive. The building was chris- 
tened "Fairview Apartments." Miss 
Lydia Landis was awarded the 
prize for naming the building. 



The president of the senior class 
cleaning the plate glass of the front 
door of the Apartment House with 
Bon Ami reveals to us a pleasing 
trait of his character. 



Dorothy Elizabeth Baugher, la- 
test arrival at the Fairview apart- 
ments, watch us grow. 



Mr. Christian Stern used his ar- 
tistic eye to grade the lawn around 
the "apartments." Capital job, 
brother. 



Miss Henning at the table. 
"When I come, down to visit the 
boy's rooms they don't need to 
clean them. I will feel more at 
home." 



a clergy- 



Teacher — "What is 
man? 

Student — "He is the man who 
runs after the auctioneer at sales." 



"I suppose I've got to invite 
Miss to go with me," said he. 

"Why, will she be disagreeable 
if you don't?" 

"Oh no, she's not disagreeable at 
all, she's just expectant." 



Experience of Campers 

"How are you getting on, Art 
"asked Ollie. 

"Oh simply rotten. I don't be- 
lieve my bloomin' worm's trying." 



Good Business 

Old gentleman — "Well my man, 
how is business today?" 

Man in the street — "Nice and 
dull, thank you, sir." 

Old gentleman — "Oh!" 

Man in the streets — "Yes sir, I'm a 
knife grinder, you see." 



Miss Walker— "Oh, I feel so 
badly." 

Miss Martz — "You had better go 
to see the undertaker." 

Miss Walker — "I am just dving 
to." ■ 



Said Ann to her mother, when 
she was a little girl, "Mother, why 
don't you make 'mom' corn?" 



Someone heard Miss Lisky say in Miss Leister in chemistry: "Does 

her sleep. "Ah, you call me Ina and Babbit metal serve the same pur- 
I'll call you Joe." pose as axle grease?" 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



27 



She — "You used to say that Mary 
was such a sweet, pensive little 
girl." 

He — "Well, she soon got over 
that, you might say that she be- 
came ex-pensive." 



"Prof — would you punish a fel- 
low for something he hadn't done?" 

"Certainly not, Mr. Harshman. 
That would be unjust." 

"That's all right then. I didn't 
do my theme for English." 



Prof. Hoffer making an an- 
nouncement in the dining room, 
"There was found on the campus a 
gold man's watch." 



Bechtel had a yellow dog 

Who ate potato peels; 
And everywhere that Bechtel 
went, 

The dog was at his heels. 



In dining room. Fish for dinner. 
Student: "I wonder what kind of 
gravy this is?" 

Miss Fogelsanger: "Oh, I guess, 
fish gravy." 



Mr. Lininger in basement — There 
must be gas escaping somewhere 
up-stairs. 

Professor Harley — Nathan Meyer 
was rehearsing his oration as I 
came down. 



Some people have their thinking 
like their washing, done out. 



Prof. A. C. B. — Perhaps the Afri- 
cans can endure more heat than we, 
because they might have an extra 
layer of asbestos. 



Are You Aware of the Fact 

That school days are over? 

That an opportunity lost can 
never be regained? 

That social privileges are at a 
premium? 

That in Abysinia women have the 
privilege of abusing and bossing 
their husbands? 

That it is not safe to go strolling 
on a Sunday afternoon unchaper- 
oned? 

That sunshine always follows 
rain ? 

That President Harding wears a 
10-D shoe? 

That Dorothy Elizabeth Baugher 
is an added member to the junior 
faculty of E. C. 

That people who sit around wait- 
ing for their ship to come in usually 
find it is hardship? 

That in the United States there 
are thirty-five people to every 
square mile, but in Europe its that 
number to every square meal? 

That it is poor economy to cut 
down on schools and use the money 
later on jails and reformatories? 



Busy Letters. 



The letters have a lot to do, 
Particularly I and U! 

Of course they always strive to C, 

How very useful they can B ! 

And they R quite successful too, 
For each one watches for his Q ! 

O, in the spelling lesson, G! 

They suit us children to a T! 
But best of all are U and I — 
I surely need not tell you Y! 

Daisy M. Moore. 



28 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Darby Brand Canned Foods Are Quality 
Packed. Packed Exclusively For 

Comly, Flanigen & Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 

118 & 120 So., Delaware Ave., Phila. 

Ask Your Dealer For Darby Brand 
A Trial will convince 



A. B. DRACE 
PAINTER 

AND 

PAPER HANGER 



S. Market St. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



COLLEGE JEWELRY OF THE BETTER 
SORT 

J. F. APPLE CO. 

MANUFACTURING 
JEWELER 

College and Fraternity Pins, Rings, Medals 

Prize Cups, Foot Balls, Basket Balls 

120 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. Box 570 

DR. S. J. HEINDEL & SON 

DENTIST 

Out-of-Town Friday each -week 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

HEADQUARTERS FOR MAGAZINES 

Subscriptions and Counter Sales 

Best Display in County 

THE ROOT MAGAZINE AGENCY 

21 W. High St. Elizabethtown, Pa. 



FOR PHOTOGRAPHS 

CALL AT BISHOP'S 

New and Modern Studio 

Elizabethtown, Penna. 
We Guarantee All Work 

See us before having your diploma or those pictures framed. 
AMATEUR FINISHING SOLICITED 

EASTMAN LINE OF KODAKS AND FILMS FOR SALE 

i 

>OOQQQQQOOQOQQQQCX}QQQQQQQQQOQQQCX>QQQQQQQQQQ)OQQQQQQQQOQQQQDQOQ< 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



29 



Franklin & Marshall College 

LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 
Offers Liberal Courses in Arts and Sciences 

Campus of 54 acres with ten building 
including Gymnasium and complete Ath- 
letic Field. 

For Catalogue apply to 
HENRY H. APPLE, D.D., LL.D., Pre.. 



GO TO 

HORSrS 

CENTRE SQUARE 

for 

Oysters, Ice Cream, Confectionery 



GANSMAN'S 

W. Cor. North Queen & Orange Streets 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



Men's 
Reliable Outfitters 

Suits to measure from $35 to $65 

Ready made Suits for Young Men from 
$25.00 to $35.00 

Plain Suits Constantly on Hand from 
$25.00 to $35.00 



Waterman Fountain Pens 



-AT- 



Ream's Book Store 



One Price — Always the Lowest 



Y. M. C. A. BUILDING 
LANCASTER, -:- PENNA 

H. H. GOOD 

Central Meat Market 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 



Bell Phone 31R4 
EL'ZABETHTOWN, '-:- PENNA. 

LANCASTER SANITARY MILK CO. 



PASTURIZED MILK 

AND 
CREAMERY BUTTER 



PURITY ICE CREAM 

North and Frederick Sts. 
BOTH PHONES, LANCASTER, PA. 

CLOTHING FOR THE MAN OR BOY 

Complete line of 

SUITS & OVERCOATS 

Suits made to your measure. Men's 
furnishing a specialty. Best make of Shoes 
of all kinds for Men, Ladies and Children. 

Agent for first-class Laundry 



J. N. OLWEILER 
Near Centre Square Elizabethtown 



30 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



EAT 

Gifnzenhaiiser's Bread 

Delivered by 

E. C. HEILMAN 

Opposite P. R. R. Station Elizabethtown 

Save Your Money by Bringing Your Shoes 

to 

E. W. MILLER 

DEALER IN SHOE FINDINGS 

All Kinds of 

Rubbers and Shoe Repairing Neatly Done 

221 South Market Street 
ELIZABETHTOWN, :■: :-: PENNA. 



LUMBER 

AND 

MILL WORK 



We saw timbers 80 ft. and longer and 
deliver a barn complete in a couple weeks. 



B. F. Hiestand & Sons 



MARIETTA, 



PENNA. 



When In Need Of 

SHOES 

WHICH WILL GIVE YOU EXTREMELY LONG WEAR COME TO 

The W. A. Withers Shoe Co. 

OLD MARKET HOUSE BLDG. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Prompt, Careful Attention Given To Mail Orders 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



31 



QUALITY 

LEBANON 

BOLOGNA 

Made in the Most Modern and 

Sanitary Plant 
Manufacturing this Famous Product 





"MORRIS SUPREME" 

FOOD PRODUCTS 

Advertised and known over the 
Entire World 

THE LEBANON BOLOGNA 

and 

PROVISION CO. 
D. B. Buck, Secretary and Mgr. 
H. W. Buck, Distributor 



CLASS PINS AND RINGS 

For Colleges, High Schools, Sunday 
Schools, etc. Illustrated catalog mailed 
upon request. We are also Headquarters 
for Colleges and High School pennants. 
Let us know your wants. 

UNION EMBLEM CO. 
Dept. 89, Palmyra, Pa. 



FO'lJ^^pPEN 

Imade on honor-builtfor service.1 



Base Ball and Lawn Tennis Goods 

Foot Ball and Basket Ball Goods 

Sporting Goods Of All Kinds 

Books, Stationery and Office 

Supplies 

DUTEWEILER 

813 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, :-: :-: PENNA. 



WHATEVER YOU NEED IN 

MERCHANDISE 

ALWAYS GO TO 

GREENBLATTS DEPT. STORE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 
IT WILL PAY YOU 



*ooooooooooex>ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooocx>ooooooooooooexxxx3j 

DEMY & DETRA 

Dealers in 

FARM IMPLEMENTS AND REPAIRS, HUBER TRACTORS, GASOLINE AND 
OIL ENGINES, HAND AND POWER PUMPS 



REPAIRING A SPECIALTY 



nd. Phone 628 
Bell Phone 63-R2 



ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

^OOOOOOO0OOOOOCXXXX)OOO0O0O0€)0O0O0O00OOO000OCXX)O0OO0O0000000OO^ 



32 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Conducted on Sanitary Principles 

is the 

RALPH GROSS 

SHAVING PARLOR 

Agency for Manhattan Laundry 



THE BEST THERE IS IN 

HARDWARE 

At the Lowest Possible Price 

BOGGS' QUALITY HARDWARE STORE 

Eiizabethtown, Pa. 



LEHMAN & WOLGEMUTH 
COM L 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED and FLOUR 
BOTH 'PHONES ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



JOHN M. SHOOKERS 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 

Repairing a Specialty 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 



Kodaks & Films Stationery 

H. K. DORSHEIMER 

Confections Athletic Goods 



)OOOQOOOOOOOOOQOQOQOOOOQOOGOOQQOOOOOQOOQQQGOQOQQOOOOOQOOOOOOQ< 

PIANOS-VICTROLAS 

Musical Instruments of Every Description 
Our Line Is Complete 



32 Makes of Pianos, 40 Styles 

Victor, Cheney, Star, Franklin and Solotone Phonograph 
Popular Sheet Music 9c a Copy 



CASH OR EASY PAYMENT PLAN 



KIRK JOHNSON & CO. 

16-18 W. King Street LANCASTER, -:- PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



33 



GO TO 



GUY The BARBER 

HE'S ON THE SQUARE 

Kwick-Lite, Flashlights 

Kyanize, Floor Finish 



KIEFFER & LANDIS 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

Real Estate 

Insurance Collections 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Joseph H. Rider & Son 



BOOKS BIBLES 

STATIONERY 

Phonographs 



I. A. SHIFFER 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 39 S> Market St. Elizabethtown 



FOR GOOD EATS CALL AT 

Hornafiiis' Restaurant 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

OYSTERS IN SEASON 

ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 

IT WILL PAY YOU TO VISIT 

HIRSH & BR0. 

Centre Square, LANCASTER 

for 

Ready-Made and Made-to-Order 

Clothing tor Men and Boys 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS 



COLLE.GE. HILL DAIRY 

PURE MILK AND CREAM 

Delivered Daily 

S. G. GRAYBILL 

ELIZABETHTOWN, -:- PENNA. 

H. H. BRANDT 

Dealer in all kinds of 
BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE AND 
ROOFING PAPER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



We are one of the largest manufacturers of 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

in the United States 



Strictly One Price To All 

[ Established in 1854 



CENTRAL 
MUSIC STORE 



Victrolas, Grafonolas, Records, Stringed 
Instruments, Stationery, Kodaks, Eastman 
Films, Waterman Fountain Pens and 
Greeting cards. 

Films Developed and Printed 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



H. C. Schock, President J. E. Longenecker, V. President 

H. N. Nissly, Cashier 

SECURITY PROGRESS 

UNION NATIONAL MOUNT JOY BANK 



MOUNT JOY, 



PENNA. 



Capital $125,000.00 Surplus and Profits $264,000.00 

Deposits $1,324,871.00 

An Honor Roll National Bank, Being 421 in Strength in the United States and 

2nd in Lancaster County 

Resources $2,165,000.00 

All Directors Keep in Touch With the Bank's Affairs 

The Bank Board Consists of the Following: 

H. C. Schock . Eli F. Grosh I. D. Stehman Christian L. Nissley 

J. E. Longenecker John G. Snyder J. W. Eshleman Johnson B. Keller 

T. M. Breneman Eli G. Reist Samuel B. Nissley S. N. Mumma 

Rohrer Stoner 

WE PAY 4% INTEREST ON CERTIFICATES AND SAVINGS 



SCHMIDT 
BAKERY 



Harrisburg, Pa. 



PRINTING 



For Schools, Colleges, Etc. is our hobby. 
The fact that we have a city equipped 
printing office in a country town, is suf- 
ficient evidence that we can do satis- 
factory work and last but not least, our 
prices are right. At present we are print- 
ing many monthlies for schools thruout 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This book- 
let is the product of our office. If the work 
appeals to you, get our price on your 
publication. 



The BULLETIN 

Jno. E. Schroll, Propr. 

MOUNT JOY, PENNA. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



35 



THE WILLEY COMPANY INC. 

Superior Laundry Machinery 



factory Columbia, penna. 



OFFICE PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



109 East King Street 




Lancaster, Penna. 



JACOB FISHER 

8 Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
WATCHMAKER & JEWELER 
With you for 40 years that's all 
From 10 to 20 per cent, lower than the 
lowest for the same grade of make. 




Seller's Kitchen Cabinet, the best ser- 
vant in your house. I have just received 
a half car load of above cabinets, which I 
will sell at Special reductions. Call and 
see the Cabinet, and get prices. 



R. D. 2 



H. S. HOTTENSTEIN, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



HERSHEY TRUST CO. 

HERSHEY, PENNA. 
Capital, Surplus and Profits $425,000.00 
Resources $3,500,000.00 
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 
M. S. Hershey, President 
W. H. Lebhicker, V. Pres. 
Ezra F. Hershey, V. Pres. 
C. Stechon, Treas. 



John 


A 


Landis 




U. 


G. 


Risser, M.D. 


J. 


B 


Leithiser 




Jo 


hn 


E. Snyder 


W 


m. 


F. 


R. Murrie 




A. 


W 


Stauffer 






Commercial Bank! 


ng 


Department 


Saving 


Department 




Trust 


Department 



LARGEST CIRCULATION AND 
ADVERTISING PATRONAGE 

Elizabethtown Chronicle 

Fifty-one Years Old and Still Young 



Garrett, Miller & Co. 



Electrical 
Supplies 



N. E. Cor. Fourth & Orange Sts. 
WILMINGTON, -:- -:- DELAWARE 



36 



OUR COLLEGE TI \ 



iOO(xyy^ooo<yy(yyoooGOQooGOGoooo(yyyx^oQO(Xiooooooooooooooo<y^Go(. 



o 



Hertzler's Department Store 

N. E. CORNER CENTRE SQUARE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 




Always Ready to Supply Your Needs Satisfactorily in O 

© 
DRY GOODS, STAPLE AND FANCY NOTIONS, BEST GROCERIES, FRUITS, Q 

SWEETMEATS, SHOES, WINDOW SHADES, QUEENSWARE, MEN'S 
WOMEN'S, BOYS' AND GIRL'S CLOTHING, OIL CLOTH, LINO- 
LEUM, CARPETS, RUGS, ETC. 

Goods displayed on three floors and separate carpet store, three doors 
east of Post Office. 

Agents for made to measure clothing — International Tailoring Co. of New 
York. 

We carry full stocks notwithstanding the great difficulty in obtaining 
goods at these high prices. 

Long experience in merchandising goe with prices of goods purchased here. 

HERTZLER BROS. 

O 

o 

;OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOrs 




000OOO000G0G000OCX3O0OO0 



GARBER GARAGE 




ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



AUTHORIZED 

SALES 

AND 

SERVICE 

Our Repair Department Is Complete with the Latest Ford Approved Machinery 
Ford Prices Used AH Work Guaranteed 



KLEIN'S 
Milk Chocolate 



Almond Bars 

"The Milkiest Kind of Milk Chocolate" 

oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 

MUTH BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN 

COAL, FLOUR, FEED AND LUMBER 

Our Special Domino Feed 

We aim to give a square deal that will merit 
your trade and friendship 

ELIZABETHTOWN, 
oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 




^OOOOOOOOO0OCXXXXX3OCX>CK3OOOOOOOO00OOOOOOOOO0OOO0OOOCXX>OOO0OOCX)O 

Elizabefhfown College 

Fall Semester Opens September 5, 1921 

An Accredited College, with an excellent record. 

Prospects for the coming year unusually good. 

The largest student body ever seen on College Hill. 

The strongest faculty in her history. 

Three teachers will have the equivalent of the Ph. D., nine will have the 
A. M., or at least its equivalent, two the B. D., one the Ph. B., and 
the rest of the college teachers will have the A. B., with at least 
some graduate work in addition. 

A. B. and B. S. Courses in the College, fully approved by the Association 
of Colleges of the Middle Atlantic States and Maryland. Oppor- 
tunities to concentrate in Education, English and History, Science, 
or Finance and Commerce. 

Professional or Teachers' Courses, of Junior College standing, in Edu- 
cation, Finance and Commerce, and Music, all of which are fully 
accredited. 

Pre-Medical Course for students planning to enter medical schools. 

Preparatory Courses for those who have not had the opportunity to com- 
plete a standard high school course. 

ADVANTAGES AT ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE 

A beautiful College Campus overlooking town. 

A safe place for young people be in school. 

An ideal Christian envirenment to inspire. 

Physical education directed by able directors. 

Health habits, moral standards and Christian ideals are upheld. 

Industry, thoroughness and efniency easily caught. 
Expenses Moderate; much lower than in many institutions. 
Write today about your plans and problems. 
Our slogan for the summer "EVERY ONE BRING ONE" new student 

to Elizabethtown College in the Fall. 



Elizabethtown College, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

OOOOGOOOOOOOOOOOOO(XyOOOO<^OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOGOi